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The Little Tribe That Could

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  • salcamarillo1@sbcglobal.net
    As descendants of San Francisco’s aboriginal people, the Muwekma Ohlone Indian tribe seldom gets much respect. But that could be about to change. In the
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 30, 2007
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      As descendants of San Francisco’s aboriginal people, the Muwekma Ohlone Indian tribe seldom gets much respect. But that could be about to change.


      In the arcane and often contradictory world known as Indian Country, the Muwekma Ohlone have long been a special case. Claiming San Francisco and much of the Bay Area as their ancestral homeland, the Muwekma, about 450 strong, are the Rodney Dangerfield of California Indian tribes.

      Seldom have they gotten much respect.

      The little-known tribe was summarily ignored in the late 1980s when it laid claim first to the Presidio, and then to the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, after the government announced the closure of military installations at those locations.

      More recently, it suffered the indignity of having other tribes backed by powerful casino interests (but with dubious ancestral connections to the Bay Area) seek to establish lucrative gaming empires at San Francisco's doorstep, on its claimed ancestral turf. Those tribes — including the Koi Nation and several other upstate Pomo groups, each with designs on opening gaming meccas along the East Bay shoreline — possess something that has long eluded the Muwekma: all-important federal recognition.



      Click to read the rest of the article, use your back button to return to this page:



      <http://www.sfweekly.com/2007-03-28/news/the-little-tribe-that-could>




      Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monitory gain to those who have expressed an interest in receiving the material for research and educational purposes. This is in accordance with Title 17 U. S. C. section 107.
      http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html
    • salcamarillo1@sbcglobal.net
      As descendants of San Francisco’s aboriginal people, the Muwekma Ohlone Indian tribe seldom gets much respect. But that could be about to change. In the
      Message 2 of 2 , May 30 4:13 AM
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        As descendants of San Francisco’s aboriginal people, the Muwekma Ohlone Indian tribe seldom gets much respect. But that could be about to change.

        In the arcane and often contradictory world known as Indian Country, the Muwekma Ohlone have long been a special case. Claiming San Francisco and much of the Bay Area as their ancestral homeland, the Muwekma, about 450 strong, are the Rodney Dangerfield of California Indian tribes.

        Seldom have they gotten much respect.

        The little-known tribe was summarily ignored in the late 1980s when it laid claim first to the Presidio, and then to the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, after the government announced the closure of military installations at those locations.

        More recently, it suffered the indignity of having other tribes backed by powerful casino interests (but with dubious ancestral connections to the Bay Area) seek to establish lucrative gaming empires at San Francisco's doorstep, on its claimed ancestral turf. Those tribes — including the Koi Nation and several other upstate Pomo groups, each with designs on opening gaming meccas along the East Bay shoreline — possess something that has long eluded the Muwekma: all-important federal recognition.



        Click to read the rest of the article, use your back button to return to this page:



        <http://www.sfweekly.com/2007-03-28/news/the-little-tribe-that-could/full>




        Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monitory gain to those who have expressed an interest in receiving the material for research and educational purposes. This is in accordance with Title 17 U. S. C. section 107.
        http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html
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