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New homes arrive for rancheria

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  • Sal Camarillo
    FINLEY -- New homes have arrived for Big Valley Rancheria tribal members, and are perched atop cinder blocks along Soda Bay Road in Finley awaiting
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 6, 2006
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      FINLEY -- New homes have arrived for Big Valley Rancheria tribal
      members, and are perched atop cinder blocks along Soda Bay Road in
      Finley awaiting installation. When they will be ready for their
      already selected occupants to move in is another question, according
      to tribal officials.

      The tribe contracted with Executive Homes of Chico for the purchase
      of the pre-fabricated homes, which arrived beginning in early
      November. Eight have arrived so far; the last two are expected this
      week or next, said Housing Director Linda Hedstrom, for a total of
      10.

      The 10 are part of a project a Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
      housing project going in off of Soda Bay Road on Yellow Hammer Lane,
      and will be leased long-term to the tribal members selected by
      lottery to occupy them.

      These 10 make the second in a succession of three for the Big Valley
      Pomo, said Hedstrom. The last, also HUD-funded, consisted of six
      architect-designed stick homes constructed by Origin Construction
      out of Mendocino.

      Another two-house project is planned for the area, and awaits
      approved funding through the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to
      clear "environmental red tape," said Hedstrom. The environmental
      review underway is expected to go through "at any time."

      She said the projects are a product of Tribal Chair Anthony Jack and
      the tribal government making housing a priority for the tribe. "We
      have such huge housing needs among the tribal members," said
      Hedstrom. "They're trying to regather the tribal members."

      Tribal Administrator David Smith said recently that when a housing
      project goes in, half of the housing goes to tribal elders. The rest
      are selected based on income. Hedstrom estimated that "the vast
      majority of households are income ellegible."

      Ground was prepared on the site in mid-October, and the homes'
      foundations will be constructed under them where they sit. While
      noting that the construction is scheduled to be completed the the
      end of February, Hedstrom said they are "ahead of schedule."



      <http://www.record-bee.com/local/ci_4786866>



      Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monitory
      gain to those who have expressed an interest in receiving the
      material for research and educational purposes. This is in
      accordance with Title 17 U. S. C. section 107.
      http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html
    • salcamarillo1@sbcglobal.net
      FINLEY -- New homes have arrived for Big Valley Rancheria tribal members, and are perched atop cinder blocks along Soda Bay Road in Finley awaiting
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 6, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        FINLEY -- New homes have arrived for Big Valley Rancheria tribal
        members, and are perched atop cinder blocks along Soda Bay Road in
        Finley awaiting installation. When they will be ready for their
        already selected occupants to move in is another question, according
        to tribal officials.

        The tribe contracted with Executive Homes of Chico for the purchase
        of the pre-fabricated homes, which arrived beginning in early
        November. Eight have arrived so far; the last two are expected this
        week or next, said Housing Director Linda Hedstrom, for a total of
        10.

        The 10 are part of a project a Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
        housing project going in off of Soda Bay Road on Yellow Hammer Lane,
        and will be leased long-term to the tribal members selected by
        lottery to occupy them.

        These 10 make the second in a succession of three for the Big Valley
        Pomo, said Hedstrom. The last, also HUD-funded, consisted of six
        architect-designed stick homes constructed by Origin Construction
        out of Mendocino.

        Another two-house project is planned for the area, and awaits
        approved funding through the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to
        clear "environmental red tape," said Hedstrom. The environmental
        review underway is expected to go through "at any time."

        She said the projects are a product of Tribal Chair Anthony Jack and
        the tribal government making housing a priority for the tribe. "We
        have such huge housing needs among the tribal members," said
        Hedstrom. "They're trying to regather the tribal members."

        Tribal Administrator David Smith said recently that when a housing
        project goes in, half of the housing goes to tribal elders. The rest
        are selected based on income. Hedstrom estimated that "the vast
        majority of households are income ellegible."

        Ground was prepared on the site in mid-October, and the homes'
        foundations will be constructed under them where they sit. While
        noting that the construction is scheduled to be completed the the
        end of February, Hedstrom said they are "ahead of schedule."



        <http://www.record-bee.com/local/ci_4786866>



        Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monitory
        gain to those who have expressed an interest in receiving the
        material for research and educational purposes. This is in
        accordance with Title 17 U. S. C. section 107.
        http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html
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