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Faux Native: prosecuting Indian arts and crafts counterfeiters

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  • Harvest
    Last week a California man pleaded guilty to a federal misdemeanor charge of selling fake Native American jewelry at a Santa Fe art show. A federal judge
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 26, 2013
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      Last week a California man pleaded guilty to a federal misdemeanor charge of selling fake Native American jewelry at a Santa Fe art show.

      A federal judge sentenced 60-year-old Andrew Gene Alvarez aka "Redhorse" to 30 months probation for violating the Indian Arts and Crafts Act by falsely stating that jewelry he made and sold was the creation of a Native American. Part of Alvarez's sentence prohibits him from claiming that any jewelry he makes is a Native American product.

      The Indian Arts and Crafts Act forbids the offer or display for sale and the sale of any good in a manner falsely suggesting that it is Indian-produced, an Indian product or the product of a particular Indian or Indian tribe. It's a "truth-in-advertising law designed to prevent products from being marketed as `Indian-made,' when the products are, in fact, not made by Indians as defined in the Act."

      According to court records, the FBI launched an investigation into Alvarez after receiving a tip from the Interior Department's Indian Arts and Crafts Board (IACB). The IACB asserted that Alvarez, who is not an enrolled member of any recognized Native American tribe, claimed he was either Mescalero Apache or Colville and Mayo Indian as he sold goods in Santa Fe and across the U.S.

      Read the rest of the story here:
      http://alibi.com/news/44863/Faux-Native.html
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