Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Northern California tribe has survived a harsh past

Expand Messages
  • Victoria
    Northern California tribe has survived a harsh past Tuesday, April 29, 2008 By The Madera Tribune http://www.maderatribune.com/news/newsview.asp?c=241973
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 29, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Northern California tribe has survived a harsh past
      Tuesday, April 29, 2008
      By The Madera Tribune
      http://www.maderatribune.com/news/newsview.asp?c=241973
      <http://www.maderatribune.com/news/newsview.asp?c=241973>
      Few in Madera are likely to have heard of the 550-member tribe that has
      partnered with the North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians in compacts that
      may bring a 2,500-slot-machine casino north of Madera.

      An estimated 1,500 to 2,000 Wiyot people lived in the redwood-forested
      shores of northern California before 1850. But after 1860 the numbers
      dropped to 200 and by 1910 less than 100 full-blooded Wiyot lived on
      their traditional land along Humboldt Bay. On the tribe's Web site
      www.wiyot.com, the decline is attributed "to disease, slavery, target
      practice, 'protection,' ... being hearded from place to place and, of
      course, massacres."

      The most infamous massacre took place on a wintry morning Feb. 25, 1860.

      The incident took place at the village site of Tuluwat on the northern
      part of an island in Humboldt Bay, about a mile and a half from Eureka.
      There many Wiyots gathered annually for a traditional renewal ceremony
      that lasted seven to 10 days. Most of the Wiyot men would leave the
      island each night to return the next morning with fresh supplies.

      A band of settlers from Eureka reportedly paddled to the island -now
      known as Indian Island- armed with hatchets, knives and clubs, which
      were used to avoid the far-from-stealthy sound of gunshots. Sleeping
      Wiyot people - mostly women and children - were slain, and then two
      other villages were also raided. Eighty to a hundred Wiyot were killed.
      Only one Wiyot - an infant named Jerry James - survived the island
      attacks that night.

      Writer Bret Harte, who was employed by a local newspaper, covered the
      aftermath of the event, and wrote, "a more shocking and revolting
      spectacle never was exhibited to the eyes of a Christian and civilized
      people. Old women wrinkled and decrepit lay weltering in blood, their
      brains dashed out and dabbled with their long grey hair. Infants
      scarcely a span along, with their faces cloven with hatchets and their
      bodies ghastly with wounds."

      After the massacre the Wiyots were forcibly removed by the Army to Fort
      Humboldt for their protection and later that same year were taken to the
      Klamath River Reservation. A flood forced a relocation to the Smith
      River Reservation...




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.