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Klamath and global perspective - erosion of indigenous people's communities

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  • teharatats
    Victoria s comment, water rights—the Yurok Tribe and the Klamath Tribes—appear ready to pay. In contrast, the Hoopa Tribe has rejected the deal claiming
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 5, 2008
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      Victoria's comment,

      "water rights—the Yurok Tribe and the Klamath Tribes—appear ready to pay. In contrast, the Hoopa Tribe has rejected the deal claiming they will not cede water rights for a plan that won't recover Klamath Salmon. Looked at from a global perspective, the proposed waiver of water rights is part of the ongoing, worldwide movement to extinguish the rights of Indigenous Peoples; looked at historically, demanding a waiver of tribal water rights in exchange for money and other "

      is right on.

      I am a member of Kahnawake, in Quebec (aka Canada:) The Ste.Lawrence Seaway was cut THROUGH our home by a "coalition" of Canadian and US interests (mid 1950's). My Great Grandfather strongly resisted this, which was supported by some of the tribe. He had the last sustenance farm on the reserve, and was well known for his horse and buggy moving
      vegies, poultry and fish to customers both on and off the reserve.

      They dug and blasted the seaway through bedrock to within 30 feet of the farmhouse until he and my Great-Grandmother HAD to move and sell at last. This was made possible by leaders who cooperated with the Seaway Authority and seemingly ignored that sycophantic dependence
      on non-native resources corrodes the community, ANY community. It may not have helped that he was a traditionalist and also a leader of the underground (at the time) Longhouse.

      In retrospect, many elders have now come to believe that minimizing this [dependence] is something that must be a priority. My mother is now seen in a video on display at the Smithsonian Indian Museum - surprise for me:) Anyway, it was awesome to hear my mom (and she is no "radical") voice the idea that the most significant thing to happen to
      Mohawk people in recent history was the taking of the Seaway and our loss of connection to OUR water and shoreline along the Lachine Rapids, where life was centered when I was a kid.

      So keep your independence and keep your water rights.

      Nia:wen Ko:wa tenon
      Sko:nen Ko:wa
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