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Contra Causal Free Will

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  • Stephen Lawrence
    Came across a four hundred ish year old definition of CCFW which I thought people might be interested to see, if they haven t before. I m thinking especially
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 5, 2011
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      Came across a four hundred ish year old definition of CCFW which I thought people might be interested to see, if they haven't before. I'm thinking especially of Tom.

      http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~uctytho/dfwVariousHobbes.htm

      "Lastly, that ordinary definition of a free agent, namely, that a free agent is that, which, when all things are present which are needful to produce the effect, can nevertheless not produce it, implies a contradiction, and is nonsense; being as much as to say, the cause may be sufficient, that is to say, necessary, and yet the effect shall not follow."

      Best,

      Stephen
    • Tom Clark
      Good old Hobbes! It s interesting that he thought the ordinary understanding of a free agent was contra-causal, not compatibilist. Even back then most folks
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 5, 2011
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        Good old Hobbes! It's interesting that he thought the ordinary
        understanding of a free agent was contra-causal, not compatibilist. Even
        back then most folks held nonsensical views about themselves. Seems like
        the libertarian intuition might be hard wired.

        >
        > Came across a four hundred ish year old definition of CCFW which I
        thought people might be interested to see, if they haven't before. I'm
        thinking especially of Tom.
        >
        > http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~uctytho/dfwVariousHobbes.htm
        >
        > "Lastly, that ordinary definition of a free agent, namely, that a free
        agent is that, which, when all things are present which are needful to
        produce the effect, can nevertheless not produce it, implies a
        contradiction, and is nonsense; being as much as to say, the cause may
        be sufficient, that is to say, necessary, and yet the effect shall not
        follow."
        >
        > Best,
        >
        > Stephen
        >
        >
        >
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