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Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....

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  • KuzinBruceFlutes@aol.com
    If you make flutes long enough you ll be amazed at how many different ways there are to screw up a flute. Kuz [Non-text portions of this message have been
    Message 1 of 29 , Mar 1 4:52 AM
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      If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many different ways
      there are to screw up a flute.
      Kuz


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bradd-CanadianMohawk
      I use a reamer to get me at least half way then switch to burning. Two things to watch for, especially with hard/brittle woods. with a piece of purpleheart
      Message 2 of 29 , Mar 1 7:23 AM
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        "I use a reamer to get me at least half way then switch to burning.

        Two things to watch for, especially with hard/brittle woods. with a piece of purpleheart or bloodwood, the top surface areas can dry quickly if left in the sun for more than a few minutes or if over-handled. If the wood is the least bit over-dry, then a slightest twist on the reamer can crack the wood, as can burning too fast - since it instantly dries the wood even more....been there ...figured it out. Funny though, we have to ensure that the gluing surfaces are wiped thoroughly with acetone to remove the excess oils before gluing!

        Bradd

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: George and Twila Mitchell
        To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2010 10:09 PM
        Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....



        Greetings Kuz,

        I am clamping the flute in a cross slide vise in my drill press. I didn't think I had tightened it up enough to crack it. In fact it could have happened when I started opening up the holes. I use a reamer to get me at least half way then switch to burning.
        More to learn, I just wish I could learn some of it without doing it all the hard way.

        Wish you all the best.

        --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, KuzinBruceFlutes@... wrote:
        >
        > Bad flute days happen:> at times for no noticeable reason.
        >
        > That bloodwood flute shouldn't have cracked though, even with the thin
        > walls.
        > How are you going about your drilling?
        > Kuz
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Jeremy
        And after that, how many ways there are to repair those screw ups and make it look like you meant to go that way all along :) -Jeremy
        Message 3 of 29 , Mar 1 7:48 AM
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          And after that, how many ways there are to repair those screw ups and make it look like you meant to go that way all along :)

          -Jeremy

          --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, KuzinBruceFlutes@... wrote:
          >
          > If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many different ways
          > there are to screw up a flute.
          > Kuz
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • entrekin1
          My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8 bore and assume it has a 1 bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until the air shows through. Lee
          Message 4 of 29 , Mar 1 8:13 AM
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            My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until the air shows through.

            Lee

            --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, KuzinBruceFlutes@... wrote:
            >
            > If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many different ways
            > there are to screw up a flute.
            > Kuz
            >
          • David Allen
            OOh. An invisible flute. :D David A ________________________________ From: entrekin1 To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 29 , Mar 1 9:01 AM
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              OOh. An invisible flute. :D

              David A





              ________________________________
              From: entrekin1 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
              To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, March 1, 2010 11:13:19 AM
              Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....


              My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until the air shows through.

              Lee

              -

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Mike Jones
              That s a different way to make fingerholes! It s a good thing I stay with bamboo and its natural wall thickness. Mike Jones
              Message 6 of 29 , Mar 1 10:54 AM
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                That's a different way to make fingerholes! It's a good thing I stay
                with bamboo and its natural wall thickness.

                Mike Jones

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                > [mailto:nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                > entrekin1
                > Sent: Monday, March 01, 2010 10:13 AM
                > To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those
                > days.....
                >
                > My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume
                > it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until
                > the air shows through.
                >
                > Lee
                >
                > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com,
                > KuzinBruceFlutes@... wrote:
                > >
                > > If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many
                > different ways
                > > there are to screw up a flute.
                > > Kuz
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Mike Jones
                I had heard that the wood/bamboo is just the vessel, that the real flute is the air column on the inside! I guess Lee was just trying to get to the real flute!
                Message 7 of 29 , Mar 1 10:56 AM
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                  I had heard that the wood/bamboo is just the vessel, that the real
                  flute is the air column on the inside! I guess Lee was just trying to
                  get to the real flute!

                  Mike Jones

                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                  > [mailto:nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                  > David Allen
                  > Sent: Monday, March 01, 2010 11:01 AM
                  > To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those
                  > days.....
                  >
                  > OOh. An invisible flute. :D
                  >
                  > David A
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: entrekin1 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
                  > To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Mon, March 1, 2010 11:13:19 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those
                  > days.....
                  >
                  >
                  > My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume
                  > it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until
                  > the air shows through.
                  >
                  > Lee
                  >
                  > -
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Bob Child
                  Lee believes in ethereal flutes...he practices what he preaches. uglyboy Bob [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 29 , Mar 1 11:06 AM
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                    Lee believes in ethereal flutes...he practices what he preaches.

                    uglyboy Bob




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • George and Twila Mitchell
                    Been there and got the t-shirt. One of my very first drone flutes in cedar. I was shaping the mouthpiece and wasn t paying enough attention to how far I had
                    Message 9 of 29 , Mar 1 5:53 PM
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                      Been there and got the t-shirt. One of my very first drone flutes in cedar. I was shaping the mouthpiece and wasn't paying enough attention to how far I had already gone. Sanded right through into the SAC!

                      I have learned SO many ways to make some very pretty firewood.

                      --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, entrekin1 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until the air shows through.
                      >
                      > Lee
                      >
                      > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, KuzinBruceFlutes@ wrote:
                      > >
                      > > If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many different ways
                      > > there are to screw up a flute.
                      > > Kuz
                      > >
                      >
                    • Jeremy
                      The first time I ever did solid decorative inlay it was because I had sanded or chiseled through into the SAC. Needed to seal it and make it look like I meant
                      Message 10 of 29 , Mar 1 8:34 PM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        The first time I ever did solid decorative inlay it was because I had sanded or chiseled through into the SAC. Needed to seal it and make it look like I meant to do it in the first place. So I took a flat thin piece of bone, cut it into a long triangle and inlaid it on the top of the SAC, completely covering and sealing my mistake. I've made this mistake three times in total and always solved it with a solid inlay. Sooo, before you throw your pretty firewood in the stove, take a second look...

                        Mitakuye Oyasin,

                        Jeremy


                        --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "George and Twila Mitchell" <gsmitchell2@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Been there and got the t-shirt. One of my very first drone flutes in cedar. I was shaping the mouthpiece and wasn't paying enough attention to how far I had already gone. Sanded right through into the SAC!
                        >
                        > I have learned SO many ways to make some very pretty firewood.
                        >
                        > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, entrekin1 <no_reply@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until the air shows through.
                        > >
                        > > Lee
                        > >
                        > > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, KuzinBruceFlutes@ wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many different ways
                        > > > there are to screw up a flute.
                        > > > Kuz
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • Clif Dawson
                        Isn t that what contrasting wood is for? Bore out a piece of some other wood and glue it to the end. It will look a lot nicer AND solve your B/L ratio problem
                        Message 11 of 29 , Mar 2 12:05 AM
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                          Isn't that what contrasting wood is for? Bore out a piece of some other
                          wood and glue it to the end. It will look a lot nicer AND solve your B/L
                          ratio problem at the same time. :-)

                          Clif

                          The voyage of discovery is not in seeking new landscapes, but in
                          having new eyes.
                          -Marcel Proust -


                          oh yea. I am sure even the best have those days.
                          Myself, I just found out that the pretty wood I cut up, bored and sanded isnt going to work too good at 15" with a 1 1/4 " bore.

                          What was I thinking ?TP

                          ________________________________
                          From: George and Twila Mitchell <gsmitchell2@...>
                          To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sun, February 28, 2010 11:38:07 AM
                          Subject: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....


                          We have a break in the weather here in Texas. It is 63 so far today. Nice change from the record snowfall we had last week so I was chomping at the bit to get out to the shop this weekend. I had a decent day yesterday getting a beautiful bloodwood flute ready for finger holes. Went out this morning and I was trying to be careful but got the walls too thin. Cracked right down the middle when I started to drill. I tried to convince myself that bloodwood is tough and so the thinner wall would not matter. So much for that. Well....$&%^ $!

                          Picked up another flute that I have in process and over shot my tonic note. I am wondering if I should even touch anything else today. I hate to pass up such a nice day but I can't afford the heartache!!!

                          So is anyone else having "One of those days"?

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                        • Clif Dawson
                          Stuff a bore sized dowel into it and drill through into that. No cracking, no splinters, nice and clean! Now, about all those OTHER 999 bad day things. Got a
                          Message 12 of 29 , Mar 2 12:15 AM
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                            Stuff a bore sized dowel into it and drill through into that.
                            No cracking, no splinters, nice and clean!

                            Now, about all those OTHER 999 bad day things. Got a few
                            of those hanging around too! :-)

                            Clif

                            "Smile, son. Don't disconcert the masses."
                            from "The Great Waldo Pepper".
                            Kuz is right. I have drilled holes in 1/8 western red cedar with no cracking. Then again, me and purple heart don't get along well. I have had more than my share of them explode while working on them(rounding particularily), and a few I exploded against the shop wall. The holes and marks in my wall are there to remind me that we ALL have those days!
                            Bradd




                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • entrekin1
                            Did he just call me an airhead?
                            Message 13 of 29 , Mar 2 6:36 AM
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                              Did he just call me an airhead?

                              --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, Bob Child <weatherflute@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Lee believes in ethereal flutes...he practices what he preaches.
                              >
                              > uglyboy Bob
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                            • Bob Child
                              Airhead, my friend? I prefer to refer to it as CCC syndrome, cavernous cranial conditioning ...both you and I know it s a common side-effect from being
                              Message 14 of 29 , Mar 2 7:24 AM
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                                Airhead, my friend? I prefer to refer to it as CCC syndrome, "cavernous cranial conditioning"...both you and I know it's a common side-effect from being snowed and iced in on our respective mountain homesteads this winter. I'll trade you 3" of my old ice layer for 6" of your new powder...deal? I'll even throw in a piece of Lacewood to sweeten the deal! ;-)

                                bob


                                Sent: Tue, March 2, 2010 9:36:57 AM
                                Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....


                                Did he just call me an airhead?

                                --- In nativeflutewoodwork ing@yahoogroups. com, Bob Child <weatherflute@ ...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Lee believes in ethereal flutes...he practices what he preaches.
                                >
                                > uglyboy Bob




                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Bradd-CanadianMohawk
                                After all these years I am still in search of the perfect flute. One that I don t make a mistake on! However, as most around me point out, mistakes are a
                                Message 15 of 29 , Mar 2 9:18 AM
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                                  After all these years I am still in search of the 'perfect' flute. One that I don't make a mistake on! However, as most around me point out, mistakes are a true sign of handcraftmanship. Knowing how to fix them is what determines a craftsperson from a production assitant!

                                  Bradd


                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Jeremy
                                  To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Monday, March 01, 2010 11:34 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....



                                  The first time I ever did solid decorative inlay it was because I had sanded or chiseled through into the SAC. Needed to seal it and make it look like I meant to do it in the first place. So I took a flat thin piece of bone, cut it into a long triangle and inlaid it on the top of the SAC, completely covering and sealing my mistake. I've made this mistake three times in total and always solved it with a solid inlay. Sooo, before you throw your pretty firewood in the stove, take a second look...

                                  Mitakuye Oyasin,

                                  Jeremy

                                  --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "George and Twila Mitchell" <gsmitchell2@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Been there and got the t-shirt. One of my very first drone flutes in cedar. I was shaping the mouthpiece and wasn't paying enough attention to how far I had already gone. Sanded right through into the SAC!
                                  >
                                  > I have learned SO many ways to make some very pretty firewood.
                                  >
                                  > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, entrekin1 <no_reply@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until the air shows through.
                                  > >
                                  > > Lee
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, KuzinBruceFlutes@ wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many different ways
                                  > > > there are to screw up a flute.
                                  > > > Kuz
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Bradd-CanadianMohawk
                                  I drill my starter finger holes from the inside now. I can finish them inside before glueup...nice and clean, no blowout. The charts for different bore
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Mar 2 9:21 AM
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                                    I drill my starter finger holes from the inside now. I can finish them inside before glueup...nice and clean, no blowout. The charts for different bore sizes/keys are terrific as long as we stick with one common TSH size!

                                    Bradd

                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Clif Dawson
                                    To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2010 3:15 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....



                                    Stuff a bore sized dowel into it and drill through into that.
                                    No cracking, no splinters, nice and clean!

                                    Now, about all those OTHER 999 bad day things. Got a few
                                    of those hanging around too! :-)

                                    Clif

                                    "Smile, son. Don't disconcert the masses."
                                    from "The Great Waldo Pepper".
                                    Kuz is right. I have drilled holes in 1/8 western red cedar with no cracking. Then again, me and purple heart don't get along well. I have had more than my share of them explode while working on them(rounding particularily), and a few I exploded against the shop wall. The holes and marks in my wall are there to remind me that we ALL have those days!
                                    Bradd

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • theciampa
                                    Bradd, I would add that mistakes teach us how to make better flutes. As for the perfect flute... if we could make the perfect flute everytime, we would stop
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Mar 2 10:25 AM
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                                      Bradd, I would add that mistakes teach us how to make better flutes. As for the perfect flute... if we could make the perfect flute everytime, we would stop learning and we would not enjoy the challenge and anticipation that comes with striving for crafting a better flute.
                                      regards,
                                      Steve

                                      --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "Bradd-CanadianMohawk" <canadianmohawk@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > After all these years I am still in search of the 'perfect' flute. One that I don't make a mistake on! However, as most around me point out, mistakes are a true sign of handcraftmanship. Knowing how to fix them is what determines a craftsperson from a production assitant!
                                      >
                                      > Bradd
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ----- Original Message -----
                                      > From: Jeremy
                                      > To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                                      > Sent: Monday, March 01, 2010 11:34 PM
                                      > Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > The first time I ever did solid decorative inlay it was because I had sanded or chiseled through into the SAC. Needed to seal it and make it look like I meant to do it in the first place. So I took a flat thin piece of bone, cut it into a long triangle and inlaid it on the top of the SAC, completely covering and sealing my mistake. I've made this mistake three times in total and always solved it with a solid inlay. Sooo, before you throw your pretty firewood in the stove, take a second look...
                                      >
                                      > Mitakuye Oyasin,
                                      >
                                      > Jeremy
                                      >
                                      > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "George and Twila Mitchell" <gsmitchell2@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > Been there and got the t-shirt. One of my very first drone flutes in cedar. I was shaping the mouthpiece and wasn't paying enough attention to how far I had already gone. Sanded right through into the SAC!
                                      > >
                                      > > I have learned SO many ways to make some very pretty firewood.
                                      > >
                                      > > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, entrekin1 <no_reply@> wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > My favorite trick is to take a blank with a 7/8" bore and assume it has a 1" bore when I start to turn it, then keep turning until the air shows through.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > Lee
                                      > > >
                                      > > > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, KuzinBruceFlutes@ wrote:
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > If you make flutes long enough you'll be amazed at how many different ways
                                      > > > > there are to screw up a flute.
                                      > > > > Kuz
                                      > > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >
                                    • George and Twila Mitchell
                                      I think that is a very interesting idea Brad. I can see where boring starter holes before glueup gives you the chance to fine tune the inner hole. I may have
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Mar 2 5:02 PM
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                                        I think that is a very interesting idea Brad. I can see where boring starter holes before glueup gives you the chance to "fine tune" the inner hole. I may have to give this a try. Thanks for sharing!



                                        --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "Bradd-CanadianMohawk" <canadianmohawk@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > I drill my starter finger holes from the inside now. I can finish them inside before glueup...nice and clean, no blowout. The charts for different bore sizes/keys are terrific as long as we stick with one common TSH size!
                                        >
                                        > Bradd
                                        >
                                        > ----- Original Message -----
                                        > From: Clif Dawson
                                        > To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                                        > Sent: Tuesday, March 02, 2010 3:15 AM
                                        > Subject: Re: [Native Flute Woodworking] I'm having one of those days.....
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Stuff a bore sized dowel into it and drill through into that.
                                        > No cracking, no splinters, nice and clean!
                                        >
                                        > Now, about all those OTHER 999 bad day things. Got a few
                                        > of those hanging around too! :-)
                                        >
                                        > Clif
                                        >
                                        > "Smile, son. Don't disconcert the masses."
                                        > from "The Great Waldo Pepper".
                                        > Kuz is right. I have drilled holes in 1/8 western red cedar with no cracking. Then again, me and purple heart don't get along well. I have had more than my share of them explode while working on them(rounding particularily), and a few I exploded against the shop wall. The holes and marks in my wall are there to remind me that we ALL have those days!
                                        > Bradd
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                      • dad3399
                                        I was at a festival this past summer. I was sitting at a booth and sucking all the knowledge I could out of a very well known and respected maker. A person
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Mar 2 6:34 PM
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                                          I was at a festival this past summer. I was sitting at a booth and sucking all the knowledge I could out of a very well known and respected maker. A person picked up one of his flutes and it just fell into two pieces down a crack. I don't think that you necessarily did anything wrong. It is possible that your wood already had a hairline crack for some reason and you just happened upon it.

                                          dd

                                          --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "George and Twila Mitchell" <gsmitchell2@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > We have a break in the weather here in Texas. It is 63 so far today. Nice change from the record snowfall we had last week so I was chomping at the bit to get out to the shop this weekend. I had a decent day yesterday getting a beautiful bloodwood flute ready for finger holes. Went out this morning and I was trying to be careful but got the walls too thin. Cracked right down the middle when I started to drill. I tried to convince myself that bloodwood is tough and so the thinner wall would not matter. So much for that. Well....$&%^$!
                                          >
                                          > Picked up another flute that I have in process and over shot my tonic note. I am wondering if I should even touch anything else today. I hate to pass up such a nice day but I can't afford the heartache!!!
                                          >
                                          > So is anyone else having "One of those days"?
                                          >
                                        • George and Twila Mitchell
                                          I believe that the wood must have had a crack or I cracked it when I was reaming the holes. I never thought how much torque a reamer puts on the wood along the
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Mar 3 4:44 PM
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                                            I believe that the wood must have had a crack or I cracked it when I was reaming the holes. I never thought how much torque a reamer puts on the wood along the grain. I am re-thinking the use of a reamer in favor of burning.
                                            Thanks for the replys guys. It's nice to have someone to commiserate with. Not that I want any of you guys to have a bad day....but it makes me feel better that you do!

                                            Happy journey everyone.

                                            --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "dad3399" <dadicks@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > I was at a festival this past summer. I was sitting at a booth and sucking all the knowledge I could out of a very well known and respected maker. A person picked up one of his flutes and it just fell into two pieces down a crack. I don't think that you necessarily did anything wrong. It is possible that your wood already had a hairline crack for some reason and you just happened upon it.
                                            >
                                            > dd
                                            >
                                            > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "George and Twila Mitchell" <gsmitchell2@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > We have a break in the weather here in Texas. It is 63 so far today. Nice change from the record snowfall we had last week so I was chomping at the bit to get out to the shop this weekend. I had a decent day yesterday getting a beautiful bloodwood flute ready for finger holes. Went out this morning and I was trying to be careful but got the walls too thin. Cracked right down the middle when I started to drill. I tried to convince myself that bloodwood is tough and so the thinner wall would not matter. So much for that. Well....$&%^$!
                                            > >
                                            > > Picked up another flute that I have in process and over shot my tonic note. I am wondering if I should even touch anything else today. I hate to pass up such a nice day but I can't afford the heartache!!!
                                            > >
                                            > > So is anyone else having "One of those days"?
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • Bradd-CanadianMohawk
                                            Some tips that might seem common sense to some and not to others. When people drill holes, expecially in thinner walls, there are two common things they can do
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Mar 3 6:45 PM
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Some tips that might seem common sense to some and not to others.

                                              When people drill holes, expecially in thinner walls, there are two common things they can do that will damage the wood. One is that they have the drill press speed set incorrectly or don't bother changing the speed when switching from soft wood to hard wood and vise versa. Read the manual for the correct speeds. The other (more common) is that they try to drill the hole in one shot or use a drill bit that is too coarse. Drilling in small increments will keep the wood cool and allow the shavings to get out of the way before the next press. A brad-point bit is almost always coarser than a normal bit and has a tendancy to catch if not kept razor sharp. Yes, it's possible to drill in one smooth motion but I have had the experience of a nicked bit grabbing the side of the hole as it went through. I didn't realize until it was too late that the bit was nicked. I always check now! Also, very hardwoods do heat up quickly, and the expansion/catching problem can still occur - along with the fact that they dull the bits a lot quicker. Best to keep the bits sharp. Best to go slow.

                                              If you are going to burn brittle woods with burning sticks, then it's best not to burn the hole all in one shot either, since this can cause cracks to from the quick expansion of the heat. Burn a little, rest a little, burn a liitle more, rest a little more and so on.

                                              If you intend on using a dremel and stone bit to burn the holes (very common approach), then you have to be very careful not to go too fast as well. As the wood heats up, it expands and the stone can catch on the sides of the hole, again, cracking the wood. With a dremel you can feel and hear what you are doing...a real bonus.

                                              *** Here's a quick tip and terrific use for a screwed up flute. (besides firewood, door stops or wind chimes of course!) A llllooonnnggggtime ago I couldn't afford a sliding drill vise. So I scrounged around my shop and, in my scrapbin, found a half of a flute blank where I had over routed the other half. From that point to now, I use the good routed half from the flute-wanna-be as a base for drilling the already rounded flutes. The rounded blank fits inside the old routed portion. The routed portion still has a flat bottom. A fence on the drill press allows the whole thing to slide back and forth, while staying centered. I never did need to buy that sliding vise!

                                              ****** One more tip for those that want to make their finger holes from the inside. I drill my 1/8th starter holes from the inside, then using a round stone dremel bit, just 'touch' the inside(bottom) of the hole. It leaves the bottom of the hole slightly tapered and smooths everything out in a jiffy. Try it yourself!


                                              Hope this helps!
                                              Bradd


                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              From: George and Twila Mitchell
                                              To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                                              Sent: Wednesday, March 03, 2010 7:44 PM
                                              Subject: [Native Flute Woodworking] Re: I'm having one of those days.....



                                              I believe that the wood must have had a crack or I cracked it when I was reaming the holes. I never thought how much torque a reamer puts on the wood along the grain. I am re-thinking the use of a reamer in favor of burning.
                                              Thanks for the replys guys. It's nice to have someone to commiserate with. Not that I want any of you guys to have a bad day....but it makes me feel better that you do!

                                              Happy journey everyone.

                                              --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "dad3399" <dadicks@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > I was at a festival this past summer. I was sitting at a booth and sucking all the knowledge I could out of a very well known and respected maker. A person picked up one of his flutes and it just fell into two pieces down a crack. I don't think that you necessarily did anything wrong. It is possible that your wood already had a hairline crack for some reason and you just happened upon it.
                                              >
                                              > dd
                                              >
                                              > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "George and Twila Mitchell" <gsmitchell2@> wrote:
                                              > >
                                              > > We have a break in the weather here in Texas. It is 63 so far today. Nice change from the record snowfall we had last week so I was chomping at the bit to get out to the shop this weekend. I had a decent day yesterday getting a beautiful bloodwood flute ready for finger holes. Went out this morning and I was trying to be careful but got the walls too thin. Cracked right down the middle when I started to drill. I tried to convince myself that bloodwood is tough and so the thinner wall would not matter. So much for that. Well....$&%^$!
                                              > >
                                              > > Picked up another flute that I have in process and over shot my tonic note. I am wondering if I should even touch anything else today. I hate to pass up such a nice day but I can't afford the heartache!!!
                                              > >
                                              > > So is anyone else having "One of those days"?
                                              > >
                                              >





                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • George and Twila Mitchell
                                              Thanks Bradd. I m going to give pre-drilling from the inside a try. Have a great week.
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Mar 4 3:35 PM
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Thanks Bradd. I'm going to give pre-drilling from the inside a try.
                                                Have a great week.



                                                --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "Bradd-CanadianMohawk" <canadianmohawk@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Some tips that might seem common sense to some and not to others.
                                                >
                                                > When people drill holes, expecially in thinner walls, there are two common things they can do that will damage the wood. One is that they have the drill press speed set incorrectly or don't bother changing the speed when switching from soft wood to hard wood and vise versa. Read the manual for the correct speeds. The other (more common) is that they try to drill the hole in one shot or use a drill bit that is too coarse. Drilling in small increments will keep the wood cool and allow the shavings to get out of the way before the next press. A brad-point bit is almost always coarser than a normal bit and has a tendancy to catch if not kept razor sharp. Yes, it's possible to drill in one smooth motion but I have had the experience of a nicked bit grabbing the side of the hole as it went through. I didn't realize until it was too late that the bit was nicked. I always check now! Also, very hardwoods do heat up quickly, and the expansion/catching problem can still occur - along with the fact that they dull the bits a lot quicker. Best to keep the bits sharp. Best to go slow.
                                                >
                                                > If you are going to burn brittle woods with burning sticks, then it's best not to burn the hole all in one shot either, since this can cause cracks to from the quick expansion of the heat. Burn a little, rest a little, burn a liitle more, rest a little more and so on.
                                                >
                                                > If you intend on using a dremel and stone bit to burn the holes (very common approach), then you have to be very careful not to go too fast as well. As the wood heats up, it expands and the stone can catch on the sides of the hole, again, cracking the wood. With a dremel you can feel and hear what you are doing...a real bonus.
                                                >
                                                > *** Here's a quick tip and terrific use for a screwed up flute. (besides firewood, door stops or wind chimes of course!) A llllooonnnggggtime ago I couldn't afford a sliding drill vise. So I scrounged around my shop and, in my scrapbin, found a half of a flute blank where I had over routed the other half. From that point to now, I use the good routed half from the flute-wanna-be as a base for drilling the already rounded flutes. The rounded blank fits inside the old routed portion. The routed portion still has a flat bottom. A fence on the drill press allows the whole thing to slide back and forth, while staying centered. I never did need to buy that sliding vise!
                                                >
                                                > ****** One more tip for those that want to make their finger holes from the inside. I drill my 1/8th starter holes from the inside, then using a round stone dremel bit, just 'touch' the inside(bottom) of the hole. It leaves the bottom of the hole slightly tapered and smooths everything out in a jiffy. Try it yourself!
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > Hope this helps!
                                                > Bradd
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                                > From: George and Twila Mitchell
                                                > To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
                                                > Sent: Wednesday, March 03, 2010 7:44 PM
                                                > Subject: [Native Flute Woodworking] Re: I'm having one of those days.....
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > I believe that the wood must have had a crack or I cracked it when I was reaming the holes. I never thought how much torque a reamer puts on the wood along the grain. I am re-thinking the use of a reamer in favor of burning.
                                                > Thanks for the replys guys. It's nice to have someone to commiserate with. Not that I want any of you guys to have a bad day....but it makes me feel better that you do!
                                                >
                                                > Happy journey everyone.
                                                >
                                                > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "dad3399" <dadicks@> wrote:
                                                > >
                                                > > I was at a festival this past summer. I was sitting at a booth and sucking all the knowledge I could out of a very well known and respected maker. A person picked up one of his flutes and it just fell into two pieces down a crack. I don't think that you necessarily did anything wrong. It is possible that your wood already had a hairline crack for some reason and you just happened upon it.
                                                > >
                                                > > dd
                                                > >
                                                > > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "George and Twila Mitchell" <gsmitchell2@> wrote:
                                                > > >
                                                > > > We have a break in the weather here in Texas. It is 63 so far today. Nice change from the record snowfall we had last week so I was chomping at the bit to get out to the shop this weekend. I had a decent day yesterday getting a beautiful bloodwood flute ready for finger holes. Went out this morning and I was trying to be careful but got the walls too thin. Cracked right down the middle when I started to drill. I tried to convince myself that bloodwood is tough and so the thinner wall would not matter. So much for that. Well....$&%^$!
                                                > > >
                                                > > > Picked up another flute that I have in process and over shot my tonic note. I am wondering if I should even touch anything else today. I hate to pass up such a nice day but I can't afford the heartache!!!
                                                > > >
                                                > > > So is anyone else having "One of those days"?
                                                > > >
                                                > >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                >
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