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Re: Tail-stock adapter for lathe

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  • rockymountainflute
    Rob... thanks for your info. As is obvious, I am looking at different ways to do things and I hate to re-invent the wheel. Seeing that you also are using a
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 1, 2004
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      Rob... thanks for your info. As is obvious, I am looking at
      different ways to do things and I hate to re-invent the wheel.
      Seeing that you also are using a lathe... Do you use a gouge for the
      entire piece? And do you work around the nest area or turn it all
      and then come back and mill it down a bit? How long does it take you
      to typically turn and rough sand a flute? No more questions - my
      head hurts.
      -rmf



      --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "Robert"
      <rcasi44@a...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, rockymountainflute
      > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Well, if you're like me when you glue your two halves together
      many
      > > times they are off center because you need to line up the bore as
      > > best you can... as a result when everything is glued up it may be
      > > impossible to tell exactly where the center is... Now if you are
      > > certain that your two halves are exactly identical then I see no
      > > problem....then again I might be totally wrong...LOL I will have
      > to
      > > lay some max/min possibilies out on paper and see if crossing the
      > > corners of mis-aligned halves always result in a correct center
      of
      > > bore... right now I don't think so.....hmmm
      > > -rmf
      >
      > I usally use an adapter like Ken, they work great. However, when I
      > want to mount the flute between centers I do it a little different.
      > After I route the bore and before I remove it from the jig, I route
      > the two ends using a 1/8 bit. When gluing up I put a nail in the
      1/8
      > hole a each end so the halves don't slide sideways. After a few
      > minutes I remove the nails and its ready for the centers. The
      problem
      > is you can't swab the bore.
      > What I usally do is I put in the 1/8 hole at the mouth. The when
      > gluing up I put my adapter in the mouth end and a nail in the 1/8
      > hole. The halves can't slide sideways. after a few minutes I remove
      > the nail and adapter and swab out the bore.
      >
      >
      > Rob
    • Robert
      ... the ... you ... My nest area is raised. I ve been using a different method on my lathe lately. It makes the wall thickness very accurate and makws working
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 1, 2004
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        --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, rockymountainflute
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Rob... thanks for your info. As is obvious, I am looking at
        > different ways to do things and I hate to re-invent the wheel.
        > Seeing that you also are using a lathe... Do you use a gouge for
        the
        > entire piece? And do you work around the nest area or turn it all
        > and then come back and mill it down a bit? How long does it take
        you
        > to typically turn and rough sand a flute? No more questions - my
        > head hurts.
        > -rmf

        My nest area is raised.> I've been using a different method on my
        lathe lately. It makes the wall thickness very accurate and makws
        working around the neat simpler.

        I've built a set of wooden rails for my lathe. It's just a box with
        the two sides higher than the flute blank that is mounted in the
        lathe. The base plate of my router is wider than the distance between
        the rails. I use a one inch straight bit in the router.

        If the bore is 3/4 inch and I want 3/16 walls, I se the router to cut
        1 1/8. I than slide the route back and forth and turn the blank by
        hand. I go full length on the sides and bottom and I stop short of
        the nest on the top. I don't have to keep measuring the blank
        thickness as when I use a gouge. I leave the blank in the lathe and
        trim the edges of the nest with a sharpe knive. I then sand by hand.
        It sands fast.

        Rob
        >
        > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "Robert"
        > <rcasi44@a...> wrote:
        > >
        > > --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, rockymountainflute
        > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Well, if you're like me when you glue your two halves together
        > many
        > > > times they are off center because you need to line up the bore
        as
        > > > best you can... as a result when everything is glued up it may
        be
        > > > impossible to tell exactly where the center is... Now if you
        are
        > > > certain that your two halves are exactly identical then I see
        no
        > > > problem....then again I might be totally wrong...LOL I will
        have
        > > to
        > > > lay some max/min possibilies out on paper and see if crossing
        the
        > > > corners of mis-aligned halves always result in a correct center
        > of
        > > > bore... right now I don't think so.....hmmm
        > > > -rmf
        > >
        > > I usally use an adapter like Ken, they work great. However, when
        I
        > > want to mount the flute between centers I do it a little
        different.
        > > After I route the bore and before I remove it from the jig, I
        route
        > > the two ends using a 1/8 bit. When gluing up I put a nail in the
        > 1/8
        > > hole a each end so the halves don't slide sideways. After a few
        > > minutes I remove the nails and its ready for the centers. The
        > problem
        > > is you can't swab the bore.
        > > What I usally do is I put in the 1/8 hole at the mouth. The when
        > > gluing up I put my adapter in the mouth end and a nail in the 1/8
        > > hole. The halves can't slide sideways. after a few minutes I
        remove
        > > the nail and adapter and swab out the bore.
        > >
        > >
        > > Rob
      • esmalesk
        Seems like we all do things just a little different. Often, when I finish the main bore I switch to a 3/16 core box bit a rout the from the SAC to the
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 2, 2004
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          Seems like we all do things just a little different. Often, when I
          finish the main bore I switch to a 3/16 core box bit a rout the from
          the SAC to the mouthpiece end. Since the router is in the same
          position as the main bore everything lines up. All I have to do is
          adjust the height to a little over an 1/8th, which gives me a round
          bore for the mouthpiece. Like Rob said, this helps in lining up the
          mouthpiece end when gluing. On the foot, I just insert a dowel the
          same diameter as the inside bore (actually sanded a bit to not
          stress the joints) to help line up the bore when clamping. After the
          clamps are on for a little bit, I pull the dowel pieces.

          Once I pull the blank out of the clamps I use a roundover bit to do
          all four edges, leaving a raised nest area. This extra step just
          makes turning round a bit easier. I then mount the bore end on a
          stepped plug mounted in my chuck (picture in photos in Ed's Stuff
          folder) and insert the live center on the tailstock into the 3/16ths
          bore at the mouthpiece end. When I use the roundover bit, I tend to
          turn round with a skew. I find that the shearing cut tends to
          deflect the blank less in the center than when using a gouge giving
          me a better final finish. I can't turn the raised nest area this
          way, so I end up using a small block plane to round the bottom and
          sides of the raised area, while still on the lathe.
          ED
        • Rev. Ken Baker
          Cool lathe! I wish mine was as good. I see that you use your lathe adapter also as the drive. Simple and effective. I actually reverse things a bit so
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 3, 2004
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            Cool lathe! I wish mine was as good.

            I see that you use your lathe adapter also as the "drive." Simple
            and effective. I actually reverse things a bit so that my adapter
            fits against the tailstock live center, and I use a custom screw
            center for the "drive" adapter. One of my goals was to keep the
            adapter diameters as close as possible to the flute diameter so that
            I could setup a rail system and use a router to roughout the blank.

            I really like doing the roughout work with the router/rails system
            because I can do a very quick rough, leaving a perfectly unifirm
            blank.

            An additional use of the router/rail system is that most of my nests
            are slightly raised with flat (of course) tops. I stop routing short
            on the north and south sides of the nest, turn off the lathe, then
            keeping the router at the same depth of cut, pass it back and forth,
            turning the stock in the (stopped and unplugged) lathe so that I can
            cut the bottom side perfectly round, then give it nice flat,
            perfectly dimensioned sides transitioning to a flat top.

            I can then take my gouges, skews, etc and complete the finishing
            details, as well as the final sanding.

            This all allows me to do the "ugly" part of the turning very quickly,
            giving me more time for the details.

            May the melody of your flutes surround your soul with shalom.
            Ken

            --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "esmalesk"
            <emalesky@c...> wrote:
            >
            > Seems like we all do things just a little different. Often, when I
            > finish the main bore I switch to a 3/16 core box bit a rout the
            from
            > the SAC to the mouthpiece end. Since the router is in the same
            > position as the main bore everything lines up. All I have to do is
            > adjust the height to a little over an 1/8th, which gives me a round
            > bore for the mouthpiece. Like Rob said, this helps in lining up the
            > mouthpiece end when gluing. On the foot, I just insert a dowel the
            > same diameter as the inside bore (actually sanded a bit to not
            > stress the joints) to help line up the bore when clamping. After
            the
            > clamps are on for a little bit, I pull the dowel pieces.
            >
            > Once I pull the blank out of the clamps I use a roundover bit to do
            > all four edges, leaving a raised nest area. This extra step just
            > makes turning round a bit easier. I then mount the bore end on a
            > stepped plug mounted in my chuck (picture in photos in Ed's Stuff
            > folder) and insert the live center on the tailstock into the
            3/16ths
            > bore at the mouthpiece end. When I use the roundover bit, I tend to
            > turn round with a skew. I find that the shearing cut tends to
            > deflect the blank less in the center than when using a gouge giving
            > me a better final finish. I can't turn the raised nest area this
            > way, so I end up using a small block plane to round the bottom and
            > sides of the raised area, while still on the lathe.
            > ED
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