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Re: First Flute

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  • seeksotter
    ... can ... little ... A jumpy fundamental can result from several things, including but not limited to a flute with a long bore. Other things to check are
    Message 1 of 54 , Aug 2, 2004
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      --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "Robert"
      <rcasi44@a...> wrote:
      > I just finished my first flute. I used Wolf's plan. It is a Gm. I
      can
      > blow all the notes well except on the fundamental. If I blow a
      little
      > more it jumps from 493 to 783. It is touchy. The bore is 3/4in, 14
      > 3/4 long. The flue is in the flute. There are wings on the bird.
      > Thanks, Rob

      A jumpy fundamental can result from several things, including but
      not limited to a flute with a long bore. Other things to check are
      whether the cutting edge is sharp (an ever-so-slightly blunted edge
      will help reduce the tendency to jump to the octave), and whether
      the opposing edge of the flue and/or the bird are sharp (again, I've
      found that softening the edges of these two items will reduce
      jumpiness--just a light touch with a diamond file is all it takes).
      I'd try subtle touching up around the TSH before cutting the length,
      especially since you will have to enlarge the fingerholes to bring
      them back into relative pitch after shortening the bore. You may
      have to make minor adjustments to the fingerholes after touching up
      the TSH, but the difference will not be as dramatic.

      Eric
    • kayak808@ymail.com
      rdbat1, I m going to try for a B this time - finger hole spacing should be easier to play, and I already have a G. BTW, in the spirit of full disclosure, I
      Message 54 of 54 , Nov 5, 2013
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        rdbat1,

        I'm going to try for a B this time - finger hole spacing should be easier to play, and I already have a G.

        BTW, in the spirit of full disclosure, I realized that the wood I started with was NOT cedar, but hem-fir from a 2x6 scrap piece I had laying around. I remembered that I was unwilling to buy material for the first set of blanks, as I was SURE that they'd be kindling before they were finished. Anyway, it's a fine looking flute, and it now has an ironwood fetish which sets the whitish wood off nicely.

        ..back to it!

        Bob



        ---In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, <rdbat1@...> wrote:

        Yes, Congratulations. I was pretty amazed when my flute worked and actually sounded good. I'm thinking I might be hooked! What key are you going to do your next flute in?



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