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Re: Flute wood

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  • rawolf99
    You can find wood that is not only inexpensive but makes good, attractive looking flutes at Lowes or Home Depot. I ve found Fir at Lowes and Western Red Cedar
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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      You can find wood that is not only inexpensive but makes good,
      attractive looking flutes at Lowes or Home Depot. I've found Fir at
      Lowes and Western Red Cedar at home depot. The Fir comes as planks
      that are between 5/8 and 3/4 thick, up to 6" wide and lengths to 12'.
      The Western Red Cedar is sold as fence rails and is 1 1/2 by 2 1/2-
      eight foot lengths. Sometimes I'll find pine at either store that
      works. Usually it will be edges of a large 2x?. It will take some
      looking, but you should be able to find wood that is clear, and has
      tight horizontal grain (I like horizontal grain because it hides the
      glue seem better). Russ
    • seeksotter
      ... 12 . ... My cedar flutes typically start out as western red cedar siding from Lowe s or Home Depot. It s rough on one side, generally with a good straight
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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        --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, rawolf99
        <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > You can find wood that is not only inexpensive but makes good,
        > attractive looking flutes at Lowes or Home Depot. I've found Fir at
        > Lowes and Western Red Cedar at home depot. The Fir comes as planks
        > that are between 5/8 and 3/4 thick, up to 6" wide and lengths to
        12'.
        > The Western Red Cedar is sold as fence rails and is 1 1/2 by 2 1/2-
        > eight foot lengths. Sometimes I'll find pine at either store that
        > works. Usually it will be edges of a large 2x?. It will take some
        > looking, but you should be able to find wood that is clear, and has
        > tight horizontal grain (I like horizontal grain because it hides the
        > glue seem better). Russ

        My cedar flutes typically start out as western red cedar siding from
        Lowe's or Home Depot. It's rough on one side, generally with a good
        straight grain, and comes in 3/4" x 3 1/2" which I rip lengthwise and
        cut to length (and I shave off the rough side by running it through
        my saw). I think you can get 4 flutes out of an 8 footer for about 5
        or 6 bucks.

        Don't forget about free salvaged wood, too. Last year I had a guy
        give me a pick-up truck load of roughly 2x2 scrap lengths of cherry,
        maple and English walnut from a furniture factory he works for. And
        I'm not above using old wooden table legs from abandoned
        furniture, either. I believe Dusty's had some interesting windfalls
        in this regard.

        Eric
      • Russ Mead
        Phil, The most available, cheep wood, go pick it up right now wood is cedar deck railing. It is about the perfect width and comes in 4 feet lengths. Perfect
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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          Phil,

          The most available, cheep wood, go pick it up right now wood is cedar
          deck railing. It is about the perfect width and comes in 4 feet
          lengths. Perfect for two flutes. It doesn't get any cheaper unless you
          salvage something.

          The wood is also great playing, and easy to work. If you are picky, you
          can even find some interesting patterns. But I just look for straight
          grain and rip it along with the straight grain edge of the wood. (The
          other sides will generally look flat sawn.) This way you don't notice
          the glue seem. But one of the best looking pieces of wood I have also
          cost less than 4 bucks for two flutes with a fiddle back pattern. It
          was a fluke that was sitting in the same deck rail stack.

          Russ

          -----Original Message-----
          From: pknight500 [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
          Sent: Monday, March 31, 2003 10:04 PM
          To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Native Flute Woodworking] Flute wood

          Thanks,Russ and Chris for your valuable suggestions. I have another
          question. Since I am new at this stuff I will probably make some
          real goof up flutes in the near future. In order to make those goof
          ups as inexpensive as possible, what would you all suggest for cheap,
          easy to work wood? Phil



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        • Russ Mead
          Phil, In my neck of the woods they put in old growth fir floors about 75 years ago. Someone around the corner was replacing their floors and had a truck load
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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            Phil,

            In my neck of the woods they put in old growth fir floors about 75 years
            ago. Someone around the corner was replacing their floors and had a
            truck load of this stuff free for the taking. I had to work around the
            nail holes, but there was almost always a flute blank half in every cut
            piece. I had so much of it I was using it for kindling as well as
            flutes. Keep an eye out for trucks around contractor remodel sites. You
            never know what you will find.

            People really appreciate you using a reclaimed piece of wood. It adds a
            special perceived character to your flute. From a pure economic stand
            point, it was still more efficient to just buy a deck rail for a couple
            of bucks. But it was worth the sorting, cleaning, ripping etc. to give
            the flute a special story.

            Russ Mead

            -----Original Message-----
            From: seeksotter [mailto:no_reply@yahoogroups.com]
            Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2003 9:11 AM
            To: nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Native Flute Woodworking] Re: Flute wood

            --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, rawolf99
            <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > You can find wood that is not only inexpensive but makes good,
            > attractive looking flutes at Lowes or Home Depot. I've found Fir at
            > Lowes and Western Red Cedar at home depot. The Fir comes as planks
            > that are between 5/8 and 3/4 thick, up to 6" wide and lengths to
            12'.
            > The Western Red Cedar is sold as fence rails and is 1 1/2 by 2 1/2-
            > eight foot lengths. Sometimes I'll find pine at either store that
            > works. Usually it will be edges of a large 2x?. It will take some
            > looking, but you should be able to find wood that is clear, and has
            > tight horizontal grain (I like horizontal grain because it hides the
            > glue seem better). Russ

            My cedar flutes typically start out as western red cedar siding from
            Lowe's or Home Depot. It's rough on one side, generally with a good
            straight grain, and comes in 3/4" x 3 1/2" which I rip lengthwise and
            cut to length (and I shave off the rough side by running it through
            my saw). I think you can get 4 flutes out of an 8 footer for about 5
            or 6 bucks.

            Don't forget about free salvaged wood, too. Last year I had a guy
            give me a pick-up truck load of roughly 2x2 scrap lengths of cherry,
            maple and English walnut from a furniture factory he works for. And
            I'm not above using old wooden table legs from abandoned
            furniture, either. I believe Dusty's had some interesting windfalls
            in this regard.

            Eric



            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            nativeflutewoodworking-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • journey572003
            ... years ... the ... cut ... sites. You ... adds a ... stand ... couple ... give ... xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx ...Howdy,
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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              --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, "Russ Mead"
              <russmead@m...> wrote:
              > Phil,
              >
              > In my neck of the woods they put in old growth fir floors about 75
              years
              > ago. Someone around the corner was replacing their floors and had a
              > truck load of this stuff free for the taking. I had to work around
              the
              > nail holes, but there was almost always a flute blank half in every
              cut
              > piece. I had so much of it I was using it for kindling as well as
              > flutes. Keep an eye out for trucks around contractor remodel
              sites. You
              > never know what you will find.
              >
              > People really appreciate you using a reclaimed piece of wood. It
              adds a
              > special perceived character to your flute. From a pure economic
              stand
              > point, it was still more efficient to just buy a deck rail for a
              couple
              > of bucks. But it was worth the sorting, cleaning, ripping etc. to
              give
              > the flute a special story.
              >
              > Russ Mead
              >
              xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

              ...Howdy, Russ!

              ...Sounds to me like 're-cycling' at it's finest!....take an old
              piece of floor, and turn it into a magical musical instrument!...
              ...Very Nice!....Thanks!........

              - Bill -
            • chris maddux
              Pine 2X4 s!!!! I have made some absolutely great flutes from 2X4 s, whatever they are made from. It was suggested to me and I thought they were crazy but as I
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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                Pine 2X4's!!!! I have made some absolutely great flutes from 2X4's, whatever they are made from. It was suggested to me and I thought they were crazy but as I got accustomed to pine/fir, I have grown to love it. Put a couple of drops of super glue on the TSH and it will give it a bit more bright sound!!!
                Chris
                pknight500 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:Thanks,Russ and Chris for your valuable suggestions. I have another
                question. Since I am new at this stuff I will probably make some
                real goof up flutes in the near future. In order to make those goof
                ups as inexpensive as possible, what would you all suggest for cheap,
                easy to work wood? Phil


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              • rstandinghorse
                these guys are probably getting tired of reading me praise aspen for flutes but im gonna do it again. aspen has a nice tight grain, its got nice density and
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 1, 2003
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                  these guys are probably getting tired of reading me praise aspen for
                  flutes but im gonna do it again. aspen has a nice tight grain, its
                  got nice density and works real nice. menards stocks it in
                  their 'hobby wood' area. you can get the 1X2 's at various lengths.
                  the nominal 1X2 is 3/4 X 1 1/2 which when put together for glueing is
                  1 1/2 X 1 1/2. works real well for 1" bore and leaves enough room for
                  a 1/4 wall thickness.

                  the only big drawback is that menards stores the boards on end and
                  they do bow. so you sometimes have to hunt and pick to get some good
                  straight ones

                  --- In nativeflutewoodworking@yahoogroups.com, pknight500
                  <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                  > Thanks,Russ and Chris for your valuable suggestions. I have
                  another
                  > question. Since I am new at this stuff I will probably make some
                  > real goof up flutes in the near future. In order to make those
                  goof
                  > ups as inexpensive as possible, what would you all suggest for
                  cheap,
                  > easy to work wood? Phil
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