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Forest Recovery Project Presentation, Pasadena

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  • corina j
    For Immediate Release through January 11,2011 Forest Recovery Project to be presented at Alexandria II in Pasadena Tuesday, January 11 at 7 p.m. – public
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 3, 2011

      For Immediate Release through January 11,2011

       

      Forest Recovery Project to be presented at Alexandria II in Pasadena

       

      Tuesday, January 11 at 7 p.m. – public welcome

       

      Alexandria II Books, Music and More, 170 S. Lake Avenue, Pasadena 91101

       

      Photographer, naturalist and forest resident Corina Roberts shares a visual documentary of the recovery of the Angeles National Forest from the Station Fire.  Over 650 images chronicle the progression of rebirth through the first fourteen months after the devastating and deadly fire that swept through a quarter of the Angeles and threatened homes from Acton to San Gabriel. 

       

      Fire is an integral part of the natural ecosystem; a natural element not unlike air, sunlight and water.  It is the most misunderstood and feared of the elements, however, and in the last century our relationship to fire has become an adversarial one.

       

      Roberts examines our historical and present relationship to fire as well as the relationship nature itself has with fire.  The images, taken in regions of the forest that remain closed to the public while the recovery takes place, illustrate the response of plant communities to fire.  Using the three major biomes of the forest; chaparral, riparian and mixed conifer/hardwood forest, the Forest Recovery Project gives viewers a glimpse into the birth/death/rebirth cycle of nature.  The images take the viewer on a journey that is both panoramic and intimate, educational and inspiring.

       

      Roberts is the founder of Redbird, a Native American and environmental non-profit association based in southern California.  The traditional American Indian understanding of fire includes its role as a force for renewal and regeneration.  Roberts saw the Station Fire as an opportunity to study and document that renewal first-hand, and to use that knowledge and the images to share this understanding of fire with a wide audience.  Ultimately the goal of the Forest Recovery Project is to save lives.  Roberts believes that creating a better understanding of fire's role in the ecology of southern California, better management policies can be implemented and the lives of more first responders can be spared. 

       

      Sample images from the Forest Recovery Project can be viewed, and Corina Roberts can be contacted via Redbird's website, www.RedbirdsVision.org

       

       

      Submitted by Corina Roberts, Founder

      Redbird - P.O. Box 702, Simi Valley, CA 93062 (805) 217-0364

      Email: redbirds_vision@...

      (there is an underscore between redbirds and vision)

       

       

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