Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Observing Report (February 26th)

Expand Messages
  • Adrian Jannetta
    Hi everyone Seems a bit quiet on the group so here is an observing report from tonight! I had the 15x50 (image stabilizing) binoculars for a session in the
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 26, 2008
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment

      Hi everyone

       

      Seems a bit quiet on the group so here is an observing report from tonight!  I had the 15x50 (image stabilizing) binoculars for a session in the back garden.  It was extremely windy and I needed the image stabilizing function tonight.  My aim is to have observing logs for all the Messier objects that are potentially visible from Northumberland by start of summer 2008.

       

      First up was an attempt to see Comet Holmes – my first chance to observe it since February 9th.  Although Comet Holmes was not visible to the naked eye, it was visible as a large blob with very low surface brightness the bins and with the image stabilising mechanism engaged.  It is an incredibly difficult object to see with any kind of light pollution in the sky.

       

      An overlooked part of the winter sky is the constellation Puppis.  It’s that bit of sky to the east (left) of Sirius and south of (below) Procyon.  It’s a pity because the Milky Way flows through it and it has lots of great open clusters for binoculars.  In particular there is a region containing three star clusters in the same field of view:  M46, M47 and NGC2423.  The brightest is M47  - an attractive grouping of a dozen stars criss-crossed over each other.  Nearby is M46 another large open cluster but much fainter.  With the 15x50 bins I could see no resolution of individual stars but I hope to return to this cluster with the 16" Dob on a less windy evening!  NGC2423 is similar in appearance but smaller in size.  Again, no stars could be resolved within its misty shape.

       

      The final cluster I saw in Puppis was a real challenge to see: M93 rises to a maximum altitude of 12 degrees and I observed it when it was at just 10 degrees.  It took several attempts to locate with a star map – there are no bright stars nearby.  M93 is a very small compact, elongated object which seemed to be partially resolved, or at least mottled in appearance, when viewed with the 15x50 binoculars.  It was located to the NW of a 3rd magnitude star called Zeta Puppis (Azmidiske) - itself a nice, wide binocular double star.

       

      Finished off with a look at M48 in the constellation Hydra (to the south of Procyon).  M48 was a fine sight with the binoculars even at low altitude and light polluted sky.  The cluster was resolved into a large sprinkling of stars when the image stabilising mechanism was switched on.

       

      I’ve now got records of 77 Messier objects and I’m hoping to take this up to 100 or more in the near future, because the majority of what are left are galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, which is well placed for observation over the next couple of months.

       

      Clear skies,

       

      Adrian

      -----------------------------

      Dr Adrian Jannetta FRAS

      NASTRO Group Moderator

       

       

    • malcolm robinson
      hi adrian i enjoyed reading your report lets hope we can get out at the weekend, 10 is ok i got a new power lead fingers crossed we can get some images soon.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 27, 2008
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment

        hi adrian

        i enjoyed reading your report lets hope we can get out at the weekend, 10" is ok i got a new power lead fingers crossed we can get some images soon.

        cheers malcolm




        ========================================
        Message Received: Feb 26 2008, 09:14 PM
        From: "Adrian Jannetta"
        To: nastro@yahoogroups.com
        Cc:
        Subject: [NASTRO] Observing Report (February 26th)

        Hi everyone

        Seems a bit quiet on the group so here is an observing report from tonight!  I had the 15x50 (image stabilizing) binoculars for a session in the back garden.  It was extremely windy and I needed the image stabilizing function tonight.  My aim is to have observing logs for all the Messier objects that are potentially visible from Northumberland by start of summer 2008.

        First up was an attempt to see Comet Holmes – my first chance to observe it since February 9th.  Although Comet Holmes was not visible to the naked eye, it was visible as a large blob with very low surface brightness the bins and with the image stabilising mechanism engaged.  It is an incredibly difficult object to see with any kind of light pollution in the sky.

        An overlooked part of the winter sky is the constellation Puppis.  It’s that bit of sky to the east (left) of Sirius and south of (below) Procyon.  It’s a pity because the Milky Way flows through it and it has lots of great open clusters for binoculars.  In particular there is a region containing three star clusters in the same field of view:  M46, M47 and NGC2423.  The brightest is M47  - an attractive grouping of a dozen stars criss-crossed over each other.  Nearby is M46 another large open cluster but much fainter.  With the 15x50 bins I could see no resolution of individual stars but I hope to return to this cluster with the 16" Dob on a less windy evening!  NGC2423 is similar in appearance but smaller in size.  Again, no stars could be resolved within its misty shape.

        The final cluster I saw in Puppis was a real challenge to see: M93 rises to a maximum altitude of 12 degrees and I observed it when it was at just 10 degrees.  It took several attempts to locate with a star map – there are no bright stars nearby.  M93 is a very small compact, elongated object which seemed to be partially resolved, or at least mottled in appearance, when viewed with the 15x50 binoculars.  It was located to the NW of a 3rd magnitude star called Zeta Puppis (Azmidiske) - itself a nice, wide binocular double star.

        Finished off with a look at M48 in the constellation Hydra (to the south of Procyon).  M48 was a fine sight with the binoculars even at low altitude and light polluted sky.  The cluster was resolved into a large sprinkling of stars when the image stabilising mechanism was switched on.

        I’ve now got records of 77 Messier objects and I’m hoping to take this up to 100 or more in the near future, because the majority of what are left are galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, which is well placed for observation over the next couple of months.

        Clear skies,

        Adrian

        ------------ --------- --------

        Dr Adrian Jannetta FRAS

        NASTRO Group Moderator

      • Adrian Jannetta
        Thanks Malcolm. We’re going out on Saturday night so it’ll have to be Friday or Sunday for me. Cheers, Adrian From: nastro@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 27, 2008
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment

          Thanks Malcolm.  We’re going out on Saturday night so it’ll have to be Friday or Sunday for me.

           

          Cheers,

           

          Adrian

           

          From: nastro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:nastro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of malcolm robinson
          Sent: 27 February 2008 20:31
          To: nastro@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [NASTRO] Observing Report (February 26th)

           

          hi adrian

          i enjoyed reading your report lets hope we can get out at the weekend, 10" is ok i got a new power lead fingers crossed we can get some images soon.

          cheers malcolm



          ========================================
          Message Received: Feb 26 2008, 09:14 PM
          From: "Adrian Jannetta"
          To: nastro@yahoogroups.com
          Cc:
          Subject: [NASTRO] Observing Report (February 26th)

          Hi everyone

          Seems a bit quiet on the group so here is an observing report from tonight!  I had the 15x50 (image stabilizing) binoculars for a session in the back garden.  It was extremely windy and I needed the image stabilizing function tonight.  My aim is to have observing logs for all the Messier objects that are potentially visible from Northumberland by start of summer 2008.

          First up was an attempt to see Comet Holmes – my first chance to observe it since February 9th.  Although Comet Holmes was not visible to the naked eye, it was visible as a large blob with very low surface brightness the bins and with the image stabilising mechanism engaged.  It is an incredibly difficult object to see with any kind of light pollution in the sky.

          An overlooked part of the winter sky is the constellation Puppis.  It’s that bit of sky to the east (left) of Sirius and south of (below) Procyon.  It’s a pity because the Milky Way flows through it and it has lots of great open clusters for binoculars.  In particular there is a region containing three star clusters in the same field of view:  M46, M47 and NGC2423.  The brightest is M47  - an attractive grouping of a dozen stars criss-crossed over each other.  Nearby is M46 another large open cluster but much fainter.  With the 15x50 bins I could see no resolution of individual stars but I hope to return to this cluster with the 16" Dob on a less windy evening!  NGC2423 is similar in appearance but smaller in size.  Again, no stars could be resolved within its misty shape.

          The final cluster I saw in Puppis was a real challenge to see: M93 rises to a maximum altitude of 12 degrees and I observed it when it was at just 10 degrees.  It took several attempts to locate with a star map – there are no bright stars nearby.  M93 is a very small compact, elongated object which seemed to be partially resolved, or at least mottled in appearance, when viewed with the 15x50 binoculars.  It was located to the NW of a 3rd magnitude star called Zeta Puppis (Azmidiske) - itself a nice, wide binocular double star.

          Finished off with a look at M48 in the constellation Hydra (to the south of Procyon).  M48 was a fine sight with the binoculars even at low altitude and light polluted sky.  The cluster was resolved into a large sprinkling of stars when the image stabilising mechanism was switched on.

          I’ve now got records of 77 Messier objects and I’m hoping to take this up to 100 or more in the near future, because the majority of what are left are galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, which is well placed for observation over the next couple of months.

          Clear skies,

          Adrian

          -----------------------------

          Dr Adrian Jannetta FRAS

          NASTRO Group Moderator

        • malcolm robinson
          hi adrian yer friday is good for me too,let me know. cheers malcolm ======================================== Message Received: Feb 27 2008, 10:08 PM From:
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 28, 2008
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment

            hi adrian

            yer friday is good for me too,let me know.

            cheers malcolm




            ========================================
            Message Received: Feb 27 2008, 10:08 PM
            From: "Adrian Jannetta"
            To: nastro@yahoogroups.com
            Cc:
            Subject: RE: [NASTRO] Observing Report (February 26th)

            Thanks Malcolm.  We’re going out on Saturday night so it’ll have to be Friday or Sunday for me.

            Cheers,

            Adrian

            From: nastro@yahoogroups. com [mailto:nastro@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of malcolm robinson
            Sent: 27 February 2008 20:31
            To: nastro@yahoogroups. com
            Subject: RE: [NASTRO] Observing Report (February 26th)

            hi adrian

            i enjoyed reading your report lets hope we can get out at the weekend, 10" is ok i got a new power lead fingers crossed we can get some images soon.

            cheers malcolm



            ============ ========= ========= ========= =
            Message Received: Feb 26 2008, 09:14 PM
            From: "Adrian Jannetta"
            To: nastro@yahoogroups. com
            Cc:
            Subject: [NASTRO] Observing Report (February 26th)

            Hi everyone

            Seems a bit quiet on the group so here is an observing report from tonight!  I had the 15x50 (image stabilizing) binoculars for a session in the back garden.  It was extremely windy and I needed the image stabilizing function tonight.  My aim is to have observing logs for all the Messier objects that are potentially visible from Northumberland by start of summer 2008.

            First up was an attempt to see Comet Holmes – my first chance to observe it since February 9th.  Although Comet Holmes was not visible to the naked eye, it was visible as a large blob with very low surface brightness the bins and with the image stabilising mechanism engaged.  It is an incredibly difficult object to see with any kind of light pollution in the sky.

            An overlooked part of the winter sky is the constellation Puppis.  It’s that bit of sky to the east (left) of Sirius and south of (below) Procyon.  It’s a pity because the Milky Way flows through it and it has lots of great open clusters for binoculars.  In particular there is a region containing three star clusters in the same field of view:  M46, M47 and NGC2423.  The brightest is M47  - an attractive grouping of a dozen stars criss-crossed over each other.  Nearby is M46 another large open cluster but much fainter.  With the 15x50 bins I could see no resolution of individual stars but I hope to return to this cluster with the 16" Dob on a less windy evening!  NGC2423 is similar in appearance but smaller in size.  Again, no stars could be resolved within its misty shape.

            The final cluster I saw in Puppis was a real challenge to see: M93 rises to a maximum altitude of 12 degrees and I observed it when it was at just 10 degrees.  It took several attempts to locate with a star map – there are no bright stars nearby.  M93 is a very small compact, elongated object which seemed to be partially resolved, or at least mottled in appearance, when viewed with the 15x50 binoculars.  It was located to the NW of a 3rd magnitude star called Zeta Puppis (Azmidiske) - itself a nice, wide binocular double star.

            Finished off with a look at M48 in the constellation Hydra (to the south of Procyon).  M48 was a fine sight with the binoculars even at low altitude and light polluted sky.  The cluster was resolved into a large sprinkling of stars when the image stabilising mechanism was switched on.

            I’ve now got records of 77 Messier objects and I’m hoping to take this up to 100 or more in the near future, because the majority of what are left are galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, which is well placed for observation over the next couple of months.

            Clear skies,

            Adrian

            ------------ --------- --------

            Dr Adrian Jannetta FRAS

            NASTRO Group Moderator

          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.