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Re: [nanotech] Re: Digest Number 253

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  • Bruce Bombere
    ... Thank you for the reference, I will take a look at it. This latest flurry of interest in superluminal phenomena is interesting in that everything is new
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 10, 2000
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      Max wrote:
      >
      > Message: 2
      > Date: Thu, 08 Jun 2000 05:08:08 -0400
      > From: Bruce Bombere <xenuxenu@...>
      > Subject: Re: my CV
      >
      > <snip>
      > Then science should not speak so intimately of the truth
      > if they are not on good terms with it.
      >
      > I was looking in one of the Mensa news groups, and some few there
      > seem astonished at things going faster than light, and are busy
      > trying to revive the aether theory of radio waves, orgone energy,
      > and "the vapors."
      >
      > The last word has not yet been had, the last laugh laughed,
      > nor the last bunsen burned.
      > <snip>
      >
      > Speaking of superluminal phenomena, there is a rather interesting paper from
      > the Dept. of Energy describing a proposed Superluminal Theory of Relativity,
      > which describes how this new theory explains, among other things, the
      > experimental value of the magnetic moment of the dueterium nucleus, to
      > within .001% according to the paper.
      > http://www.ott.doe.gov/pdfs/Superluminal.pdf
      >
      > This paper is very long, and goes through alot of algebra, but it is worth
      > reading.
      >
      > The basic gist is that there is can be reference frames where v>c, and that
      > the familiar dilation factor gamma transforms to gamma prime, which is
      > represented as sqrt(1-(c/v)^2). The paper describes the forms of the
      > superluminal relativistic time contraction, length dilation, energy, etc,
      > and then goes into some hypothetical situations involving the masses of
      > various particles. The main idea is that this new theory could help explain
      > the nuclear forces, and also the big bang.
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Thank you for the reference, I will take a look at it.

      This latest flurry of interest in superluminal phenomena is interesting
      in that everything is new again. I have found references to superluminal
      signals being noticed when the first transatlantic radio transmission
      was
      sent. Some five years ago, or so, I'd heard discussion of whether or not
      superluminal phenomena would invalidate the theory of relativity, and
      the
      conjecture was that the theory of relativity is also relative. Now there
      is discussion of the speed of gravity, which I believe I saw as
      estimated
      at more than 30x's light. But thanks again for this reference, rather
      than
      generating controversy, it would seem a more inclusive and unified
      approach.
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