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Re: New Survey

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  • J. R. Molloy
    By full blown do you mean ubiquitous and omnipresent, or just capable of making gold from raw sewage? ... From: nanotech-owner@ONElist.com
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 4, 1999
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      By "full blown" do you mean ubiquitous and omnipresent, or just capable of
      making gold from raw sewage?

      -----Original Message-----
      From: nanotech-owner@... <nanotech-owner@...>
      To: nanotech@onelist.com <nanotech@onelist.com>
      Date: Saturday, September 04, 1999 11:35 AM
      Subject: [nanotech] New Survey


      >From: nanotech-owner@...
      >
      >Hello,
      >
      >There is a new survey for the nanotech community.
      >
      >When will nanotechnology be full blown?
      >
      >----
      >
      >Possible answers are:
      >
      >o Five years
      >o Ten years
      >o Fifteen years
      >o Twenty years
      >o Thirty years
      >o Forty years
      >o Fifty years
      >o Sixty years
      >o Not in our lifetime
      >o Never
      >
      >
      >To vote, please visit the following web page:
      >
      >http://www.onelist.com/surveys/nanotech
      >
      >Note: Please do not reply to this message. Survey votes are not collected
      >via email. To vote, you must go to the ONElist website.
      >
      >
      >Thanks!
      >
      >nanotech Owner
      >
      >
      >--------------------------- ONElist Sponsor ----------------------------
      >
      >Why do TEENAGERS get WISDOM teeth?
      >What kind of TREES have square ROOTS?
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      >
      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >The Nanotechnology Industries mailing list.
      >"Nanotechnology: solutions for the future."
      >
    • Gina Miller
      To clarify the survey: Nanotechnology in it s fullest capability, where it is considered for life extension, easier space travel and home nanomachines. (The
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 4, 1999
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        To clarify the survey: Nanotechnology in it's fullest capability, where it
        is considered for life extension, easier space travel and home nanomachines.
        (The whole shabang)
        Nanogirl


        >From: "J. R. Molloy" <jr@...>
        >
        >By "full blown" do you mean ubiquitous and omnipresent, or just capable of
        >making gold from raw sewage?


        (Survey)
      • J. R. Molloy
        Okay, thanks for the clarification. ... From: Gina Miller To: nanotech@onelist.com Date: Saturday, September 04,
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 4, 1999
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          Okay, thanks for the clarification.


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Gina Miller <nanogirl@...>
          To: nanotech@onelist.com <nanotech@onelist.com>
          Date: Saturday, September 04, 1999 1:28 PM
          Subject: Re: [nanotech] New Survey


          >From: "Gina Miller" <nanogirl@...>
          >
          >To clarify the survey: Nanotechnology in it's fullest capability, where it
          >is considered for life extension, easier space travel and home
          nanomachines.
          >(The whole shabang)
          >Nanogirl
          >
          >
          >>From: "J. R. Molloy" <jr@...>
          >>
          >>By "full blown" do you mean ubiquitous and omnipresent, or just capable of
          >>making gold from raw sewage?
          >
          >
          >(Survey)
          >
          >
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          >The Nanotechnology Industries mailing list.
          >"Nanotechnology: solutions for the future."
          >
        • Spike Jones
          ... Nanotech doesnt do this, J.R. Diamonds from raw sewage perhaps, but not gold. No transmutation of elements. spike
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 5, 1999
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            > From: "J. R. Molloy" <jr@...>
            >
            > By "full blown" do you mean ubiquitous and omnipresent, or just capable of
            > making gold from raw sewage?

            Nanotech doesnt do this, J.R. Diamonds from raw sewage perhaps,
            but not gold. No transmutation of elements. spike
          • Alan Heaberlin
            Given the propensity for our government s research priorities to favor national security and secret programs to develop projects in that light, it seems
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 5, 1999
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              Given the propensity for our government's research
              priorities to favor national security and secret
              programs to develop projects in that light, it
              seems probable that any truly useful adaptations
              of nanotechnology will be produced with the
              resource of unlimited funding for black projects.
              This presupposes that there will be a quantum
              leap of imaginative and successful progress in
              someone's garage or a locally supported lab.
              If you don't believe that NSA spooks aren't
              watching the nanotechnology boards and websites I
              have some bridges in the Bay area I'd like to sell
              cheap.
              The obvious solution to a scenario such as I have
              illustrated here is some very dedicated grass
              roots projects to support the brightest and best
              minds in the field. This means funding for
              competitive salaries for project directors,
              scientists and technicians. This may be possible
              with support of private and corporate foundations
              to nonprofit research projects. Nonprofit however,
              does not mean unpaid.
              With the appropriate support for a project with
              realistic and attainable goals I don't think we
              should have to wait 10 years to see some dramatic
              progress in the fundamental work of designing a
              molecular assembler. "Full-blown" influences will
              depend on how fast the spooks get their hand on
              the results. They flew the F-117 for over 6 years
              (and in combat) before we ever got to see one!
              Realistically cynical,
              Alan Heaberlin

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: nanotech-owner@onelist.com
              > [mailto:nanotech-owner@onelist.com]
              > Sent: Saturday, September 04, 1999 11:20 AM
              > To: nanotech@onelist.com
              > Subject: [nanotech] New Survey
              >
              >
              > From: nanotech-owner@...
              >
              > Hello,
              >
              > There is a new survey for the nanotech
              > community.
              >
              > When will nanotechnology be full blown?
              >
              > ----
              >
              > Possible answers are:
              >
              > o Five years
              > o Ten years
              > o Fifteen years
              > o Twenty years
              > o Thirty years
              > o Forty years
              > o Fifty years
              > o Sixty years
              > o Not in our lifetime
              > o Never
              >
              >
              > To vote, please visit the following web page:
              >
              http://www.onelist.com/surveys/nanotech

              Note: Please do not reply to this message. Survey
              votes are not collected
              via email. To vote, you must go to the ONElist
              website.


              Thanks!

              nanotech Owner


              --------------------------- ONElist
              Sponsor ----------------------------

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              What kind of TREES have square ROOTS?
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              http://www.drscience.com/s ">Click</a>

              --------------------------------------------------
              ----------------------
              The Nanotechnology Industries mailing list.
              "Nanotechnology: solutions for the future."
            • James B. Lewis
              ... So the question becomes how to identify the project with realistic and attainable goals and then how to obtain appropriate support. I ve been involved with
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 5, 1999
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                At 7:46 AM -0700 9/5/99, Alan Heaberlin wrote:

                >The obvious solution to a scenario such as I have
                >illustrated here is some very dedicated grass
                >roots projects to support the brightest and best
                >minds in the field. This means funding for
                >competitive salaries for project directors,
                >scientists and technicians. This may be possible
                >with support of private and corporate foundations
                >to nonprofit research projects. Nonprofit however,
                >does not mean unpaid.
                >With the appropriate support for a project with
                >realistic and attainable goals I don't think we
                >should have to wait 10 years to see some dramatic
                >progress in the fundamental work of designing a
                >molecular assembler.

                So the question becomes how to identify the project with realistic and
                attainable goals and then how to obtain appropriate support.

                I've been involved with discussions to start nanotechnology-related
                enterprises several times over the past 12 years. I've also worked closely
                with the Foresight Institute over much of this period.

                A principal problem that I've observed is that it is impossible to attract
                substantial amounts of money unless there is already a mature business plan
                such that investors can expect to recoup their money in 2 to 5 years.
                Unfortunately, the basic technology leading to nanotechnology is still in
                the research phase, so it is likely that commercial products would be many
                years away. It might take 5 to 10 years of research to identify a pathway
                clearly leading to an assembler, and this research might or might not lead
                to saleable products in the interim. In the most serious attempt in which I
                was involved, the principals could not afford financially to quit their
                "day jobs" to do the large job of developing their ideas to the point of
                having a mature proposal to attract investors.

                As for a non-profit foundation to advance nanotechnology, that is a pretty
                good description of the Foresight Institute and the Institute for Molecular
                Manufacturing. Yet both of these organizations founded by Eric Drexler have
                been cash-starved. After more than 10 years promoting nanotechnology, their
                total budget is not more than a few hundred thousand dollars per year, and
                the large gifts that they have been able to attract are in the 10,000 to
                100,000 dollar range. Their efforts have been devoted to exploring ways to
                develop nanotechnology, developing policy for regulating nanotechnology,
                use of web annotations to encourage better critical discussions, pursuit of
                open source software to ensure software that is up to the job of handling
                nanodevice networks, etc. The hope is now that discussions leading to
                concrete proposals will occur at senior associate gatherings:
                http://www.foresight.org/SrAssoc/1999_Fall_Gathering/index.html
                http://www.foresight.org/SrAssoc/Perspectives/index.html
                http://www.foresight.org/SrAssoc/99Gathering/index.html

                So it is more than a bit frustrating that with all that Foresight and IMM
                have accomplished, both are still so minimally funded that they must devote
                most of their time and energy to trying to attract more senior associates
                to keep from going broke. I don't know what the problems are, but some
                possibilities are:
                1. philanthrophists wealthy enough to make a real difference are either too
                technophobic or too short-sighted to be interested.
                2. the myriad problems associated with developing nanotechnology are so
                difficult and complex that noone has been able to elucidate a compelling
                proposal.
                3. Foresight and IMM have not communicated their cases clearly and to the
                right people.

                I think further discussion of these topics would be useful and interesting.

                Jim Lewis

                James B. Lewis, Ph.D. James B. Lewis Enterprises
                7527 40th Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98115-4925
                E-mail: nanojbl@... alternate e-mail: nanojlewis@...
                World Wide Web: http://www.halcyon.com/nanojbl/
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