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Re: [nanotech] Re: our buddha nature 2

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  • Samantha Atkins
    ... One might say the home of rationalistic dualism with some fairness. ... If the Greeks had discovered irrational numbers we would have had had the age of
    Message 1 of 5 , May 30, 2000
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      charles schulz wrote:
      >
      > I would like to correct one detail: the book I was talking about was
      > obviously not from Graham Greene, that great British writer, but from
      > Brian Greene , the well known scientist.
      > Well, I don't think there has been a real form of prior knowledge as
      > you all seem to say, but as I live in France, the country of the rational

      One might say the home of rationalistic dualism with some fairness.

      > thinking since Mr Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire and so forth (that was
      > my patriotic statement before the Euro soccer cup, hahaha...), I have
      > been able to perceive some limits in that kind of western philosophy.
      > I don't deny that ancient people would have had a certain intuition-after
      > all, the concept of atom comes from the Greeks-I would even say that
      > they had a somewhat deeper vision of our universe.

      If the Greeks had discovered irrational numbers we would have had had
      the age of science long ago. What they did do in science was not simple
      intuition. Science as we know it was born in Greece.

      > The theories about relativity teach us that the world is not made out
      > of absolute and everlasting logical rules, and in that sense, the way
      > the western culture determines and defines our world is wrong and artifical.

      What you are saying doesn't have a lot to do with western culture. It
      might be a feature of some theocratic states. Absolute and everlasting
      logical rules? Well, mathematical logic might qualify for everlasting
      but the facts as known and our understanding of the implications are the
      facts as known, subject to revision with better information and
      understanding. This has been part of the western scientific tradition
      from the beginning.

      - samantha
    • Bruce Bombere
      ... Likely more has been done by now, the bit that I d heard was a Higgs field opened with a magnetic lens at 10^30 tons psi. A microwave carrier signal, a
      Message 2 of 5 , May 30, 2000
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        charles schulz wrote:
        >
        > I would like to correct one detail: the book I was talking about was
        > obviously not from Graham Greene, that great British writer, but from
        > Brian Greene , the well known scientist.
        > Well, I don't think there has been a real form of prior knowledge as
        > you all seem to say, but as I live in France, the country of the rational
        > thinking since Mr Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire and so forth (that was
        > my patriotic statement before the Euro soccer cup, hahaha...), I have
        > been able to perceive some limits in that kind of western philosophy.
        > I don't deny that ancient people would have had a certain intuition-after
        > all, the concept of atom comes from the Greeks-I would even say that
        > they had a somewhat deeper vision of our universe.
        > The theories about relativity teach us that the world is not made out
        > of absolute and everlasting logical rules, and in that sense, the way
        > the western culture determines and defines our world is wrong and artifical.(But
        > could those things be ever genuine???)
        > I totally agree with Steve about the difference of level between the
        > superstring theory and the Buddhist vision of universe.
        > There's something else though I wanted to point out: Bruce, a "higg's
        > portal" is not really possible, is it?
        >
        > Charles Schulz.
        >

        Likely more has been done by now, the bit that I'd heard
        was a Higgs' field opened with a "magnetic lens"
        at 10^30 tons psi. A microwave carrier signal, a little
        under light-speed, with a bit of Mozart was sent through
        a wave-guide into the Higgs' portal, and went through
        at 4.7 times light-speed. Quick search on the 'Net,
        I don't find it, but I'll continue in a bit.
        That 10^30 tons psi is needed to pry the "strings"
        apart says something of their cohesive nature.

        I made a note to resume the search, I'll post back results
        of where this was done and more particulars as I find them.

        I was searching the National Acadamy of Science site,
        and they have some on AMO (Atomic, Molecular and Optical)
        They state that this field is "small research,"
        solo or small team, which is encouraging as far as
        organizing projects.
        _____________________________________________
        NetZero - Defenders of the Free World
        Click here for FREE Internet Access and Email
        http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html
      • Bruce Bombere
        ... The Greek word for amber is electron. They noticed the static properties of amber, so we borrowed their word. I got that from A Dragon in Amber, by Willy
        Message 3 of 5 , May 31, 2000
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          Samantha Atkins wrote:
          >
          > charles schulz wrote:
          > >
          > > I would like to correct one detail: the book I was talking about was
          > > obviously not from Graham Greene, that great British writer, but from
          > > Brian Greene , the well known scientist.
          > > Well, I don't think there has been a real form of prior knowledge as
          > > you all seem to say, but as I live in France, the country of the rational
          >
          > One might say the home of rationalistic dualism with some fairness.
          >
          > > thinking since Mr Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire and so forth (that was
          > > my patriotic statement before the Euro soccer cup, hahaha...), I have
          > > been able to perceive some limits in that kind of western philosophy.
          > > I don't deny that ancient people would have had a certain intuition-after
          > > all, the concept of atom comes from the Greeks-I would even say that
          > > they had a somewhat deeper vision of our universe.
          >
          > If the Greeks had discovered irrational numbers we would have had had
          > the age of science long ago. What they did do in science was not simple
          > intuition. Science as we know it was born in Greece.
          >

          The Greek word for amber is electron. They noticed the static
          properties of amber, so we borrowed their word. I got that from
          "A Dragon in Amber," by Willy Ley, a book on the shelf when I
          was a kid. That book is kind of random perambulations. Willy
          was very impressed with "blue pipes," clay formations that
          are a place to look for diamonds. The market for industrial
          diamonds might soon be obsolete with the new technologies for
          carbon bonding. Mining will change as the need for mineral resources
          changes. How long did it take to get from amber to silicon?
          It took a long time from the beginning of science in Greece
          until Bayer invented aspirin. Medicine is still very primitive,
          the genome project is like a second genesis.
          _____________________________________________
          NetZero - Defenders of the Free World
          Click here for FREE Internet Access and Email
          http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html
        • Bruce Bombere
          ... CBC Canadian radio had a special about the Mozart through the portal, they have responded back that it wasn t within the last two years, I think that it
          Message 4 of 5 , May 31, 2000
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            charles schulz wrote:

            > There's something else though I wanted to point out: Bruce, a "higg's
            > portal" is not really possible, is it?
            >
            > Charles Schulz.
            >

            CBC Canadian radio had a "special" about the Mozart through the portal,
            they have responded back that it wasn't within the last two years,
            I think that it was four years ago, and asked them to look again.

            I think that this is the mechanism involved: it makes me wonder
            what a laser through the portal would do...
            Heat flow for the Yang-Mills-Higgs field and the
            Hermitian-Yang-Mills-Higgs metric

            Min-Chun Hong

            Abstract: For a parameter $\lambda >0$, we study a new type
            of vortex equations, which generalize the well-known Hermitian-Einstein
            equation, for a connection $A$ and a section $\phi$ of a holomorphic
            vector bundle $E$ over a K\"ahler manifold $X$. We establish global
            existence of smooth solutions to heat flow for a self-dual
            Yang-Mills-Higgs
            field on $E$. Assuming the $\lambda$-stability of $(E, \phi )$, we prove
            the existence of the Hermitian Yang-Mills-Higgs metric on the
            holomorphic bundle
            $E$ by studying the limiting behaviour of the gauge flow.
            _____________________________________________
            NetZero - Defenders of the Free World
            Click here for FREE Internet Access and Email
            http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html
          • Samantha Atkins
            ... A large part of why it took a long time was the long Western descent into superstition via the Church. For many centuries the writings of the ancient
            Message 5 of 5 , May 31, 2000
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              Bruce Bombere wrote:
              >
              > Samantha Atkins wrote:
              > >
              > > charles schulz wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I would like to correct one detail: the book I was talking about was
              > > > obviously not from Graham Greene, that great British writer, but from
              > > > Brian Greene , the well known scientist.
              > > > Well, I don't think there has been a real form of prior knowledge as
              > > > you all seem to say, but as I live in France, the country of the rational
              > >
              > > One might say the home of rationalistic dualism with some fairness.
              > >
              > > > thinking since Mr Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire and so forth (that was
              > > > my patriotic statement before the Euro soccer cup, hahaha...), I have
              > > > been able to perceive some limits in that kind of western philosophy.
              > > > I don't deny that ancient people would have had a certain intuition-after
              > > > all, the concept of atom comes from the Greeks-I would even say that
              > > > they had a somewhat deeper vision of our universe.
              > >
              > > If the Greeks had discovered irrational numbers we would have had had
              > > the age of science long ago. What they did do in science was not simple
              > > intuition. Science as we know it was born in Greece.
              > >
              >
              > The Greek word for amber is electron. They noticed the static
              > properties of amber, so we borrowed their word. I got that from
              > "A Dragon in Amber," by Willy Ley, a book on the shelf when I
              > was a kid. That book is kind of random perambulations. Willy
              > was very impressed with "blue pipes," clay formations that
              > are a place to look for diamonds. The market for industrial
              > diamonds might soon be obsolete with the new technologies for
              > carbon bonding. Mining will change as the need for mineral resources
              > changes. How long did it take to get from amber to silicon?
              > It took a long time from the beginning of science in Greece
              > until Bayer invented aspirin. Medicine is still very primitive,
              > the genome project is like a second genesis.
              >

              A large part of why it took a long time was the long Western descent
              into superstition via the Church. For many centuries the writings of
              the ancient Greeks were effectively lost to most of the Western world.
              Their resurfacing laid part of the groundwork for the Renaissance and
              Enlightenment.

              - s.
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