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nanotech hub

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  • Dibyadeep Paul
    Guys... With the current rate of growth, does it seem that US is going to remain the nanotech hub too? I have been hearing of the Scandinavian Nanotech valley
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 25 7:42 PM
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      Guys...

      With the current rate of growth, does it seem that US is going to remain the
      nanotech hub too? I have been hearing of the Scandinavian Nanotech valley
      becoming a very strong contender in this game...

      It would be good to know your views...

      regards
      dp


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dr. David Deal
      Though I am an American it seems that the US & China are both nanohubs if one bases the assessment on published research. Yet from a practicle viewpont of
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 27 10:46 AM
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        Though I am an American it seems that the US & China are both nanohubs
        if one bases the assessment on published research. Yet from a practicle
        viewpont of turning nanoscience into nanotechnolgy it seems the UK is
        already a true nanohub: So much in fact it gives the Amricans nano-envy



        --- In nanotech@yahoogroups.com, "Dibyadeep Paul" <dibyadeep@...> wrote:
        >
        > Guys...
        >
        > With the current rate of growth, does it seem that US is going to
        remain the
        > nanotech hub too? I have been hearing of the Scandinavian Nanotech
        valley
        > becoming a very strong contender in this game...
        >
        > It would be good to know your views...
        >
        > regards
        > dp
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • prasad geetha
        hi...... i am prasad from india.i am an engineering student.i need informations on nanotechnology and it recent developments.so,please help me. thank you. ...
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 3, 2007
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          hi......
          i am prasad from india.i am an engineering student.i need informations on nanotechnology and it recent developments.so,please help me.
          thank you.


          ---------------------------------
          Here’s a new way to find what you're looking for - Yahoo! Answers

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • earl@understandingnano.com
          Prasad, Have you looked through the nanotechnology web sites? Here s the urls for a few of them: www.understandingnano.com
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 4, 2007
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            Prasad,

            Have you looked through the nanotechnology web sites? Here's the urls
            for a few of them:

            www.understandingnano.com
            www.nanowerk.com/phpscripts/n_news.php
            www.smalltimes.com
            http://nanotech.physorg.com/

            Earl

            Quoting prasad geetha <prasad_jk2@...>:

            > hi......
            > i am prasad from india.i am an engineering student.i
            > need informations on nanotechnology and it recent
            > developments.so,please help me.
            >
            > thank you.
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Here’s a new way to find what you're looking for - Yahoo! Answers
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
          • Dibyadeep Paul
            In a recent report from nanotech wire.... http://nanotechwire.com/news.asp?nid=4417 *Top Nations in Nanotech See Their Lead Erode - Report* As nanotechnology
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 10, 2007
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              In a recent report from nanotech wire....

              http://nanotechwire.com/news.asp?nid=4417

              *Top Nations in Nanotech See Their Lead Erode - Report*


              As nanotechnology investments and product revenues grow � $12.4 billion was
              invested in nanotech R&D worldwide in 2006, and over $50 billion worth of
              nano-enabled products were sold � cross-border nanotech activity is becoming
              more important. Companies must change their practices to take advantage of
              international funding, innovation, manufacturing, and markets for their
              nano-enabled products, according to a new report from Lux Research entitled
              "Profiting from International Nanotechnology."

              "Companies active in nanotech risk missing out on key opportunities by not
              looking beyond their own borders," said the report's author, Senior Analyst
              Michael Holman, Ph.D. "It's important for them to understand which nations
              are strong in nanotechnology development. Our latest study found that the
              U.S., Japan, Germany, and South Korea remain leaders, but China is moving
              into the top tier on nanotech activity as its nanotechnology spending,
              publications, and even patents grow."

              To construct its assessment, Lux Research collected extensive data on
              nanotechnology funding and other key metrics, such as patents and
              publications, and drew on site visits conducted over the course of the year
              in Taiwan, South Korea, China, Japan, Germany, the U.K., France, and Israel.
              The study found that:


              - Government spending on nanotechnology grew to $6.4 billion in 2006,
              up 10% from $5.9 million in 2005. The U.S. leads on this metric, with
              $1.78 billion from federal and state governments, followed by Japan with
              $975 million and Germany with $563 million. However, at purchasing power
              parity (PPP) � a factor which corrects for the lower costs of goods and
              services in many nations � China reaches second place, with funding
              equivalent to $906 million.
              - Corporations spent $5.3 billion on nanotech R&D in 2006, a 19%
              increase over 2005, with the U.S. leading the way at $1.93 billion,
              followed by Japan with $1.70 billion at PPP. Developing nations are further
              behind on corporate spending, but some saw strong growth � China's estimated
              corporate nanotech funding reached $165 million at PPP, up 68% from its 2005
              total.
              - Among publications on nanoscale science and engineering topics since
              1995, the largest number, over 43,000, come from the U.S. China is in
              second place with more than 25,000 � and added over 6,000 publications in
              2006, more than twice as many as third-place Japan. International patent
              activity also swelled, growing 31% in 2006 to reach 10,105 patents from the
              countries studied. The U.S. holds the lion's share, with 6,801
              patents; Germany is in second place with 773.

              The report analyzes 14 countries' nanotech competitiveness on two axes: 1)
              nanotechnology activity, which evaluates nanotech innovation on an absolute
              scale; and 2) technology development strength, which gauges the relative
              ability of nations to use those innovations to drive economic growth. "It's
              clear that leading nations in nanotech, particularly the U.S. and Japan,
              aren't going to be pushed aside any time soon," Dr. Holman said. "They will
              have more competition at the top, however. It was striking that even within
              the top tier, countries like South Korea grew much closer to the U.S. and
              Japan, and developing nations like China, India, and Russia made strong
              moves forward just in the last year."


              On 2/28/07, Dr. David Deal <sciinfoexchange@...> wrote:
              >
              > Though I am an American it seems that the US & China are both nanohubs
              > if one bases the assessment on published research. Yet from a practicle
              > viewpont of turning nanoscience into nanotechnolgy it seems the UK is
              > already a true nanohub: So much in fact it gives the Amricans nano-envy
              >
              >
              > --- In nanotech@yahoogroups.com <nanotech%40yahoogroups.com>, "Dibyadeep
              > Paul" <dibyadeep@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Guys...
              > >
              > > With the current rate of growth, does it seem that US is going to
              > remain the
              > > nanotech hub too? I have been hearing of the Scandinavian Nanotech
              > valley
              > > becoming a very strong contender in this game...
              > >
              > > It would be good to know your views...
              > >
              > > regards
              > > dp
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Dr. David Deal
              Hi DP, Yes I have heard that also about the Scandinavian Nanohub. All in all if China can meet its energy demands it seems poised to become a leader across the
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 11, 2007
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                Hi DP,
                Yes I have heard that also about the Scandinavian Nanohub. All in all
                if China can meet its energy demands it seems poised to become a
                leader across the board. If India can overome its infrastructure
                problems it too is set to become a nanohub of activity. Japan, Taiwan
                & South Korea are innovators. I think the point I made poorly about
                the UK is they are academic leaders par excellence.(so are the
                Japanese & of course the Americans could make an example of our
                educational system as such on the University-level. It is difficult
                to outperform the Japanese from a teamwork point of view. The US
                advantage(if we have one) is we thrive on individualism which seems
                to serve as an impetus to insight & innovation.
                I would submit the field of techno-science may be the most inherently
                diplomatic & cooperative field of work there is. Along that same line
                of thinking nanoscience & nanotechnology may be the epitome of
                interdisciplinary activity, knowledge & expertise...imho :)
                david

                "Science makes sense and engineering makes cents." some famous guy :)



                --- In nanotech@yahoogroups.com, "Dibyadeep Paul" <dibyadeep@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > In a recent report from nanotech wire....
                >
                > http://nanotechwire.com/news.asp?nid=4417
                >
                > *Top Nations in Nanotech See Their Lead Erode - Report*
                >
                >
                > As nanotechnology investments and product revenues grow – $12.4
                billion was
                > invested in nanotech R&D worldwide in 2006, and over $50 billion
                worth of
                > nano-enabled products were sold – cross-border nanotech activity is
                becoming
                > more important. Companies must change their practices to take
                advantage of
                > international funding, innovation, manufacturing, and markets for
                their
                > nano-enabled products, according to a new report from Lux Research
                entitled
                > "Profiting from International Nanotechnology."
                >
                > "Companies active in nanotech risk missing out on key opportunities
                by not
                > looking beyond their own borders," said the report's author, Senior
                Analyst
                > Michael Holman, Ph.D. "It's important for them to understand which
                nations
                > are strong in nanotechnology development. Our latest study found
                that the
                > U.S., Japan, Germany, and South Korea remain leaders, but China is
                moving
                > into the top tier on nanotech activity as its nanotechnology
                spending,
                > publications, and even patents grow."
                >
                > To construct its assessment, Lux Research collected extensive data
                on
                > nanotechnology funding and other key metrics, such as patents and
                > publications, and drew on site visits conducted over the course of
                the year
                > in Taiwan, South Korea, China, Japan, Germany, the U.K., France,
                and Israel.
                > The study found that:
                >
                >
                > - Government spending on nanotechnology grew to $6.4 billion in
                2006,
                > up 10% from $5.9 million in 2005. The U.S. leads on this metric,
                with
                > $1.78 billion from federal and state governments, followed by
                Japan with
                > $975 million and Germany with $563 million. However, at
                purchasing power
                > parity (PPP) – a factor which corrects for the lower costs of
                goods and
                > services in many nations – China reaches second place, with
                funding
                > equivalent to $906 million.
                > - Corporations spent $5.3 billion on nanotech R&D in 2006, a 19%
                > increase over 2005, with the U.S. leading the way at $1.93
                billion,
                > followed by Japan with $1.70 billion at PPP. Developing nations
                are further
                > behind on corporate spending, but some saw strong growth –
                China's estimated
                > corporate nanotech funding reached $165 million at PPP, up 68%
                from its 2005
                > total.
                > - Among publications on nanoscale science and engineering topics
                since
                > 1995, the largest number, over 43,000, come from the U.S. China
                is in
                > second place with more than 25,000 – and added over 6,000
                publications in
                > 2006, more than twice as many as third-place Japan.
                International patent
                > activity also swelled, growing 31% in 2006 to reach 10,105
                patents from the
                > countries studied. The U.S. holds the lion's share, with 6,801
                > patents; Germany is in second place with 773.
                >
                > The report analyzes 14 countries' nanotech competitiveness on two
                axes: 1)
                > nanotechnology activity, which evaluates nanotech innovation on an
                absolute
                > scale; and 2) technology development strength, which gauges the
                relative
                > ability of nations to use those innovations to drive economic
                growth. "It's
                > clear that leading nations in nanotech, particularly the U.S. and
                Japan,
                > aren't going to be pushed aside any time soon," Dr. Holman
                said. "They will
                > have more competition at the top, however. It was striking that
                even within
                > the top tier, countries like South Korea grew much closer to the
                U.S. and
                > Japan, and developing nations like China, India, and Russia made
                strong
                > moves forward just in the last year."
                >
                >
                > On 2/28/07, Dr. David Deal <sciinfoexchange@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Though I am an American it seems that the US & China are both
                nanohubs
                > > if one bases the assessment on published research. Yet from a
                practicle
                > > viewpont of turning nanoscience into nanotechnolgy it seems the
                UK is
                > > already a true nanohub: So much in fact it gives the Amricans
                nano-envy
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In nanotech@yahoogroups.com <nanotech%
                40yahoogroups.com>, "Dibyadeep
                > > Paul" <dibyadeep@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Guys...
                > > >
                > > > With the current rate of growth, does it seem that US is going
                to
                > > remain the
                > > > nanotech hub too? I have been hearing of the Scandinavian
                Nanotech
                > > valley
                > > > becoming a very strong contender in this game...
                > > >
                > > > It would be good to know your views...
                > > >
                > > > regards
                > > > dp
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
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