Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [nanotech] Digest Number 1291

Expand Messages
  • Jeff Taylor
    Could you please supply some data to back up this rather bizarre statement? Residential solar arrays would lead to more deaths than coal mining? Thanks, Jeff
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 8, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Could you please supply some data to back up this rather bizarre
      statement? Residential solar arrays would lead to more deaths than
      coal mining?

      Thanks,

      Jeff

      > Yet risk analysts have suggested that if we eliminated coal power and
      > suddenly switched to point-based photovoltaics, the death rate would go *up*. This
      > because of all the bozos climbing onto their roofs to clean leaves and stuff
      > off of their solar arrays -- and slipping.
    • Mohammad Amin Moradi
      It was surprising, tell more about it please! Jeff Taylor wrote: Could you please supply some data to back up this rather bizarre
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 9, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        It was surprising, tell more about it please!

        Jeff Taylor <taylor50@...> wrote:
        Could you please supply some data to back up this rather bizarre
        statement? Residential solar arrays would lead to more deaths than
        coal mining?

        Thanks,

        Jeff

        > Yet risk analysts have suggested that if we eliminated coal power and
        > suddenly switched to point-based photovoltaics, the death rate would go *up*. This
        > because of all the bozos climbing onto their roofs to clean leaves and stuff
        > off of their solar arrays -- and slipping.





        The Nanotechnology Industries mailing list.
        "Nanotechnology: solutions for the future."
        www.nanoindustries.com



        ---------------------------------
        Yahoo! Groups Links

        To visit your group on the web, go to:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nanotech/

        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        nanotech-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




        ---------------------------------
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ISIL
        Hello ý am too glad to be in this group. I am a nanomaterial researcher and ý want to share tech with you.. I am educating in Gebze high tech
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 10, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello
          ý am too glad to be in this group. I am a nanomaterial researcher and
          ý want to share tech with you.. I am educating in Gebze high tech
          enstitute/TURKEY , material science and engineering.
          ISIL BERKUN
        • DonSaxman@aol.com
          I heard the coal/photovoltaic risk comparison at an oilfield risk management conference over a decade ago, so I can t site chapter and verse. But I checked
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 10, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            I heard the coal/photovoltaic risk comparison at an oilfield risk management
            conference over a decade ago, so I can't site chapter and verse. But I
            checked out the facts and they are certainly more suggestive than bizzare. This
            deserves a more rigorous analysis, but here's what I have.

            There are on the order of 30 coal mining deaths in a typical year (for
            instance, 27 coal mining deaths in 2002). The real killer is black lung disease.
            Between 1,600 and 3,600 Americans have black lung. Although deaths are no
            longer reported, a peak year (1972) saw 2,870 black lung deaths and the rate is
            reportedly about half that or around 1,400. So it is reasonable to estimate no
            more than American 1,500 coal mining deaths each year. (As an aside, the real
            tragedy is the number of people, mostly kids with asthma who die at least in
            part from coal-fired air pollution.)

            But how to estimate the number of citizens who would die cleaning their
            roof-top solar arrays? Well, a suggestive place to start is the number of
            construction work deaths from falling. According to the CDC, there are 1,100
            construction worker deaths in a typical year, over 800 from falls. Clearly roof falls
            are common and fatal, even to trained professionals.

            Even more interesting are the fatality rates for untrained citizens. There's
            another CDC study that examines the number of "holiday falls," that is falls
            that result in hospital visits by Americans who were putting up Christmas
            decorations on their roofs. This would appear to be a good analog for untrained
            citizens climbing on their roofs to tinker with their photovoltaic panels. With
            this in mind, there are 2,290 in holiday falls, with about 9% fatalities
            (around 200).

            So the question is, what event would result in more trips to the roof:
            Christmas decorating or cleaning panels? If solar panel trips are seven times more
            common, then they would result in more than the 1,500 coal mining deaths. I
            think this is likely, especially considering several panel cleaning trips per
            year and a target market of over 80 million residences.


            In a message dated 4/8/2005 3:37:43 PM Central Daylight Time,
            taylor50@... writes:


            Could you please supply some data to back up this rather bizarre
            statement? Residential solar arrays would lead to more deaths than
            coal mining?

            Thanks,

            Jeff

            > Yet risk analysts have suggested that if we eliminated coal power and
            > suddenly switched to point-based photovoltaics, the death rate would go
            *up*. This
            > because of all the bozos climbing onto their roofs to clean leaves and stuff
            > off of their solar arrays -- and slipping.






            The Nanotechnology Industries mailing list.
            "Nanotechnology: solutions for the future."
            www.nanoindustries.com
            Yahoo! Groups Links





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.