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Re: [nanotech] Do Shadows have weight?

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  • Ooo0001@aol.com
    In a message dated 10/08/2001 9:24:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time, ... Give me a break. Yeah, it has mass, and mass is constant whereas weight is relative to
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 8, 2001
      In a message dated 10/08/2001 9:24:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time, winchp@... writes:


      you are kidding me.  Light has weight!? I know you don't know what you are talking about because if you did you would have used "mass" not "weight".


      Give me a break. Yeah, it has mass, and mass is constant whereas weight is relative to gravitational force. I wasn't going to make the correction because that would have been a bit too anal in the context of the technical level of the question. Sheesh.

      Derek
    • Ed Minchau
      ... what you are ... not weight . ... weight is ... correction ... technical ... Actually, light does not have a mass, light has _momentum_, proportional to
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 10, 2001
        --- In nanotech@y..., Ooo0001@a... wrote:
        > In a message dated 10/08/2001 9:24:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
        > winchp@o... writes:
        >
        >
        > > you are kidding me. Light has weight!? I know you don't know
        what you are
        > > talking about because if you did you would have used "mass"
        not "weight".
        >
        > Give me a break. Yeah, it has mass, and mass is constant whereas
        weight is
        > relative to gravitational force. I wasn't going to make the
        correction
        > because that would have been a bit too anal in the context of the
        technical
        > level of the question. Sheesh.
        >
        > Derek

        Actually, light does not have a mass, light has _momentum_,
        proportional to the frequency of the light. p=E/c = h(nu)/c

        :) ed
      • server not recognized
        does it have mass or something resembling mass behaviour derived from momentum? P ... From: Ed Minchau To:
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 10, 2001
          does it have mass or something resembling mass behaviour derived from momentum?

          P
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Ed Minchau" <spider_boris@...>
          To: <nanotech@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, October 11, 2001 10:51 AM
          Subject: [nanotech] Re: Do Shadows have weight?


          > --- In nanotech@y..., Ooo0001@a... wrote:
          > > In a message dated 10/08/2001 9:24:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
          > > winchp@o... writes:
          > >
          > >
          > > > you are kidding me. Light has weight!? I know you don't know
          > what you are
          > > > talking about because if you did you would have used "mass"
          > not "weight".
          > >
          > > Give me a break. Yeah, it has mass, and mass is constant whereas
          > weight is
          > > relative to gravitational force. I wasn't going to make the
          > correction
          > > because that would have been a bit too anal in the context of the
          > technical
          > > level of the question. Sheesh.
          > >
          > > Derek
          >
          > Actually, light does not have a mass, light has _momentum_,
          > proportional to the frequency of the light. p=E/c = h(nu)/c
          >
          > :) ed
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > The Nanotechnology Industries mailing list.
          > "Nanotechnology: solutions for the future."
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
        • Ed Minchau
          ... from momentum? ... It has momentum, which can be used to knock electrons loose from their atoms. Einstein won one of his two Nobel Prizes for explaining
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 11, 2001
            --- In nanotech@y..., "server not recognized" <winchp@o...> wrote:
            > does it have mass or something resembling mass behaviour derived
            from momentum?
            >
            > P

            It has momentum, which can be used to knock electrons loose from
            their atoms. Einstein won one of his two Nobel Prizes for explaining
            this (the photoelectric effect) (incidentally, his other one was for
            a paper explaining Brownian motion...remarkably, Einstein did not
            receive the Nobel for his work on Relativity).

            The higher the frequency of the light, the more momentum, and thus
            the more electrons which may be knocked loose, chemical bonds broken,
            etc.

            :) ed

            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "Ed Minchau" <spider_boris@y...>
            > To: <nanotech@y...>
            > Sent: Thursday, October 11, 2001 10:51 AM
            > Subject: [nanotech] Re: Do Shadows have weight?
            >
            >
            > > --- In nanotech@y..., Ooo0001@a... wrote:
            > > > In a message dated 10/08/2001 9:24:24 PM Pacific Daylight Time,
            > > > winchp@o... writes:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > > you are kidding me. Light has weight!? I know you don't know
            > > what you are
            > > > > talking about because if you did you would have used "mass"
            > > not "weight".
            > > >
            > > > Give me a break. Yeah, it has mass, and mass is constant
            whereas
            > > weight is
            > > > relative to gravitational force. I wasn't going to make the
            > > correction
            > > > because that would have been a bit too anal in the context of
            the
            > > technical
            > > > level of the question. Sheesh.
            > > >
            > > > Derek
            > >
            > > Actually, light does not have a mass, light has _momentum_,
            > > proportional to the frequency of the light. p=E/c = h(nu)/c
            > >
            > > :) ed
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > The Nanotechnology Industries mailing list.
            > > "Nanotechnology: solutions for the future."
            > >
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            > >
            > >
            > >
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