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Re: A Dinosaur Question

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  • deber@ymail.com
    Hi Eugene, ... I tested, on my computer with an ext3 linux file system, how much files (empty) I could populate a directory. Here is this Bash script:
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 1, 2009
      Hi Eugene,

      > Unix starts to behave
      > strangely when a directory gets close to
      > 1000 entries.

      I tested, on my computer with an ext3 linux file system, how much files (empty) I could populate a directory.

      Here is this Bash script:

      ###############################################################
      #!/bin/bash
      # create huge amount of empty files to populate a directory
      limit=10000 #10 000 files to be ceated. Adjust the amount.
      i=1
      while [ "$i" -le $limit ]
      do
      echo -n -e "creating empty file foo$i\r"
      : > foo$i
      let "i+=1"
      done
      echo
      echo "you could now do [rm foo*] to clean the directory."
      echo "if the command [rm] can't do it in one pass, do [rmfoo1*]\
      then [rm foo2*] and so on."
      exit 0
      ##################################################################

      I reached 1 million of files inside the same directory without problem. Excepted with the command "rm" to remove so much files! So, Kevin or somebody else, sould create a stress test (with an amount of a daily entry over 50 years...) to have an idea of the limits of NB. And why not a benchmark to test the speed of each version!

      According the tiny community of French speaking users of NB, upgrading to a newer version is beneficial for the time spent with the generation of web pages.

      From my side I prefer to upgrade by creating a new blog aside. You can have several versions of NB on the same system if you put them in separate directories; then you have to start these blog engines locally in their own directory using "./nb" in lieu of "nb". You can use links to use the same data or template directory: this is usefull if you must have several versions of a website according the langage or the style sheets design. Have a look over these sites (merged with a wiki engine standing on an other server), using modified templates to include a menu bar and modified style sheets to experiment new flavors:

      http://www.oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/index.html
      http://oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/clean/
      http://oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/spring/
      http://oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/steelblue/
      http://oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/rusted/

      My web site hasn't htaccess file, so you can browse my modified templates.

      Again, these sites with deep modifications to provide a single column blog with menu bar and be text browser compatible.

      http://oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/console/
      http://oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/gothick/
      http://oceamer.com/~nanoblogger/cons-steelblue/

      --Denis
    • Eugene Wallingford
      ... Interestin, Thanks. ... I have considered that. But I would like not to mess up anyone s links or subscriptions to my my blog, so I would want to use the
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 1, 2009
        > I tested, on my computer with an ext3 linux file system, how
        > much files (empty) I could populate a directory.

        Interestin, Thanks.

        > According the tiny community of French speaking users of NB,
        > upgrading to a newer version is beneficial for the time spent
        > with the generation of web pages.
        >
        > From my side I prefer to upgrade by creating a new blog aside.

        I have considered that. But I would like not to mess
        up anyone's links or subscriptions to my my blog, so
        I would want to use the current names for the new blog.
        Perhaps I could move the current blog to a dir named
        'archive' or some such, run a script that changes all
        of the internal links to use the new path, and then
        put a link to the archive on the new blog using a newer
        NB in a directory with the original name.

        ---- Eugene
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