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Re: A mention of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award

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  • pflabaki2
    Amazon used to list the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award and the annual winners, along with the Hugo, Nebula, etc., on its site a few years ago. I haven t checked in
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 4, 2003
      Amazon used to list the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award and the
      annual winners, along with the Hugo, Nebula, etc., on its site a
      few years ago. I haven't checked in quite some time, but I don't
      see why they wouldn't have kept it up.

      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, WendellWag@a... wrote:
      > I saw recently what I think is the most mainstream example of
      the acceptance
      > (in the U.S., at least) of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award as a
      major prize. By
      > "mainstream," I don't mean by the general public (many of
      whom don't read for
      > pleasure at all, and most of those who do don't read science
      fiction or
      > fantasy) or by the academic literary sorts (most of whom don't
      tend to be impressed
      > by the Hugos or the Nebulas, either). I mean the average
      reader of science
      > fiction and fantasy in the U.S. This is in the August 2003 flyer of
      the Science
      > Fiction Book Club.
      >
      > The members of the Science Fiction Book Club are a
      considerably more
      > mainstream group than the people who tend to go to science
      fiction conventions. The
      > average subscriber to the SFBC knows vaguely about cons,
      but has never been to
      > one. They probably also know vaguely about the Hugos and
      the Nebulas. It's a
      > more mainstream group than the subscribers to the science
      fiction magazines
      > also. I suspect that most members of the SFBC have never
      subscribed to a
      > science fiction magazine. About the only way that you could
      communicate with a
      > more mainstream group of science fiction and fantasy readers
      than in the SFBC
      > flyers would be to put up notices in front of every science fiction
      and fantasy
      > section in every bookstore and library in the U.S.
      >
      > In the August 2003 flyer, there's a two-page spread with the
      headlines "The
      > Cream of the Contemporary Crop," "Many are Called but Few
      are Chosen," and
      > "Whether honored with the Hugo, the Nebula, the World
      Fantasy or another
      > prestigious award, the books featured here are some of the
      best science fiction and
      > fantasy the field has to offer." The books featured and the
      awards cited are
      > _American Gods_ by Neil Gaiman (2002 Nebula and 2002
      Hugo), _Ender's War_ by
      > Orson Scott Card (1985-6 Nebulas and 1986-7 Hugos),
      _Darwin's Radio_ by Greg Bear
      > (2000 Nebula), _In the Company of Others_ by Julie E.
      Czerneda (2001 Prix
      > Aurora), _Ship of Fools_ by Richard Paul Russo (2001 Philip
      K. Dick Award), _Dune_
      > by Frank Herbert (1965 Nebula and 1966 Hugo), _Stranger in a
      Strange Land_ by
      > Robert Heinlein (1962 Hugo), _The Moon is a Harsh Mistress_
      by Robert
      > Heinlein (1967 Hugo), and _Lord of Light_ by Roger Zelazny
      (1968 Hugo). In slightly
      > bigger pictures and text, they have _The Dalemark Quartet_ by
      Diana Wynne
      > Jones (1995 Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's
      Literature) and _The
      > Foundation Trilogy_ by Isaac Asimov (1966 Hugo).
      >
      > Wendell Wagner
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Pauline J. Alama
      Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America s online update also listed the Mythopoeic winners. Pauline ... acceptance ... prize. By ... don t read for ...
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 13, 2003
        Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America's online update also
        listed the Mythopoeic winners.

        Pauline

        --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, WendellWag@a... wrote:
        > I saw recently what I think is the most mainstream example of the
        acceptance
        > (in the U.S., at least) of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award as a major
        prize. By
        > "mainstream," I don't mean by the general public (many of whom
        don't read for
        > pleasure at all, and most of those who do don't read science
        fiction or
        > fantasy) or by the academic literary sorts (most of whom don't tend
        to be impressed
        > by the Hugos or the Nebulas, either). I mean the average reader of
        science
        > fiction and fantasy in the U.S. This is in the August 2003 flyer
        of the Science
        > Fiction Book Club.
        >
        > The members of the Science Fiction Book Club are a considerably
        more
        > mainstream group than the people who tend to go to science fiction
        conventions. The
        > average subscriber to the SFBC knows vaguely about cons, but has
        never been to
        > one. They probably also know vaguely about the Hugos and the
        Nebulas. It's a
        > more mainstream group than the subscribers to the science fiction
        magazines
        > also. I suspect that most members of the SFBC have never
        subscribed to a
        > science fiction magazine. About the only way that you could
        communicate with a
        > more mainstream group of science fiction and fantasy readers than
        in the SFBC
        > flyers would be to put up notices in front of every science fiction
        and fantasy
        > section in every bookstore and library in the U.S.
        >
        > In the August 2003 flyer, there's a two-page spread with the
        headlines "The
        > Cream of the Contemporary Crop," "Many are Called but Few are
        Chosen," and
        > "Whether honored with the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy or
        another
        > prestigious award, the books featured here are some of the best
        science fiction and
        > fantasy the field has to offer." The books featured and the awards
        cited are
        > _American Gods_ by Neil Gaiman (2002 Nebula and 2002 Hugo),
        _Ender's War_ by
        > Orson Scott Card (1985-6 Nebulas and 1986-7 Hugos), _Darwin's
        Radio_ by Greg Bear
        > (2000 Nebula), _In the Company of Others_ by Julie E. Czerneda
        (2001 Prix
        > Aurora), _Ship of Fools_ by Richard Paul Russo (2001 Philip K. Dick
        Award), _Dune_
        > by Frank Herbert (1965 Nebula and 1966 Hugo), _Stranger in a
        Strange Land_ by
        > Robert Heinlein (1962 Hugo), _The Moon is a Harsh Mistress_ by
        Robert
        > Heinlein (1967 Hugo), and _Lord of Light_ by Roger Zelazny (1968
        Hugo). In slightly
        > bigger pictures and text, they have _The Dalemark Quartet_ by Diana
        Wynne
        > Jones (1995 Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's Literature) and
        _The
        > Foundation Trilogy_ by Isaac Asimov (1966 Hugo).
        >
        > Wendell Wagner
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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