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A mention of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award

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  • WendellWag@aol.com
    I saw recently what I think is the most mainstream example of the acceptance (in the U.S., at least) of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award as a major prize. By
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2003
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      I saw recently what I think is the most mainstream example of the acceptance
      (in the U.S., at least) of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award as a major prize. By
      "mainstream," I don't mean by the general public (many of whom don't read for
      pleasure at all, and most of those who do don't read science fiction or
      fantasy) or by the academic literary sorts (most of whom don't tend to be impressed
      by the Hugos or the Nebulas, either). I mean the average reader of science
      fiction and fantasy in the U.S. This is in the August 2003 flyer of the Science
      Fiction Book Club.

      The members of the Science Fiction Book Club are a considerably more
      mainstream group than the people who tend to go to science fiction conventions. The
      average subscriber to the SFBC knows vaguely about cons, but has never been to
      one. They probably also know vaguely about the Hugos and the Nebulas. It's a
      more mainstream group than the subscribers to the science fiction magazines
      also. I suspect that most members of the SFBC have never subscribed to a
      science fiction magazine. About the only way that you could communicate with a
      more mainstream group of science fiction and fantasy readers than in the SFBC
      flyers would be to put up notices in front of every science fiction and fantasy
      section in every bookstore and library in the U.S.

      In the August 2003 flyer, there's a two-page spread with the headlines "The
      Cream of the Contemporary Crop," "Many are Called but Few are Chosen," and
      "Whether honored with the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy or another
      prestigious award, the books featured here are some of the best science fiction and
      fantasy the field has to offer." The books featured and the awards cited are
      _American Gods_ by Neil Gaiman (2002 Nebula and 2002 Hugo), _Ender's War_ by
      Orson Scott Card (1985-6 Nebulas and 1986-7 Hugos), _Darwin's Radio_ by Greg Bear
      (2000 Nebula), _In the Company of Others_ by Julie E. Czerneda (2001 Prix
      Aurora), _Ship of Fools_ by Richard Paul Russo (2001 Philip K. Dick Award), _Dune_
      by Frank Herbert (1965 Nebula and 1966 Hugo), _Stranger in a Strange Land_ by
      Robert Heinlein (1962 Hugo), _The Moon is a Harsh Mistress_ by Robert
      Heinlein (1967 Hugo), and _Lord of Light_ by Roger Zelazny (1968 Hugo). In slightly
      bigger pictures and text, they have _The Dalemark Quartet_ by Diana Wynne
      Jones (1995 Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's Literature) and _The
      Foundation Trilogy_ by Isaac Asimov (1966 Hugo).

      Wendell Wagner


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stolzi@aol.com
      Yay! We re a Prestigious Award! :) But I m amazed that they call DUNE, HARSH MISTRESS, and STRANGER contemporary. Diamond Proudbrook
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 3, 2003
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        Yay! We're a Prestigious Award! :)

        But I'm amazed that they call DUNE, HARSH MISTRESS, and STRANGER
        "contemporary."


        Diamond Proudbrook
      • pflabaki2
        Amazon used to list the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award and the annual winners, along with the Hugo, Nebula, etc., on its site a few years ago. I haven t checked in
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 4, 2003
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          Amazon used to list the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award and the
          annual winners, along with the Hugo, Nebula, etc., on its site a
          few years ago. I haven't checked in quite some time, but I don't
          see why they wouldn't have kept it up.

          --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, WendellWag@a... wrote:
          > I saw recently what I think is the most mainstream example of
          the acceptance
          > (in the U.S., at least) of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award as a
          major prize. By
          > "mainstream," I don't mean by the general public (many of
          whom don't read for
          > pleasure at all, and most of those who do don't read science
          fiction or
          > fantasy) or by the academic literary sorts (most of whom don't
          tend to be impressed
          > by the Hugos or the Nebulas, either). I mean the average
          reader of science
          > fiction and fantasy in the U.S. This is in the August 2003 flyer of
          the Science
          > Fiction Book Club.
          >
          > The members of the Science Fiction Book Club are a
          considerably more
          > mainstream group than the people who tend to go to science
          fiction conventions. The
          > average subscriber to the SFBC knows vaguely about cons,
          but has never been to
          > one. They probably also know vaguely about the Hugos and
          the Nebulas. It's a
          > more mainstream group than the subscribers to the science
          fiction magazines
          > also. I suspect that most members of the SFBC have never
          subscribed to a
          > science fiction magazine. About the only way that you could
          communicate with a
          > more mainstream group of science fiction and fantasy readers
          than in the SFBC
          > flyers would be to put up notices in front of every science fiction
          and fantasy
          > section in every bookstore and library in the U.S.
          >
          > In the August 2003 flyer, there's a two-page spread with the
          headlines "The
          > Cream of the Contemporary Crop," "Many are Called but Few
          are Chosen," and
          > "Whether honored with the Hugo, the Nebula, the World
          Fantasy or another
          > prestigious award, the books featured here are some of the
          best science fiction and
          > fantasy the field has to offer." The books featured and the
          awards cited are
          > _American Gods_ by Neil Gaiman (2002 Nebula and 2002
          Hugo), _Ender's War_ by
          > Orson Scott Card (1985-6 Nebulas and 1986-7 Hugos),
          _Darwin's Radio_ by Greg Bear
          > (2000 Nebula), _In the Company of Others_ by Julie E.
          Czerneda (2001 Prix
          > Aurora), _Ship of Fools_ by Richard Paul Russo (2001 Philip
          K. Dick Award), _Dune_
          > by Frank Herbert (1965 Nebula and 1966 Hugo), _Stranger in a
          Strange Land_ by
          > Robert Heinlein (1962 Hugo), _The Moon is a Harsh Mistress_
          by Robert
          > Heinlein (1967 Hugo), and _Lord of Light_ by Roger Zelazny
          (1968 Hugo). In slightly
          > bigger pictures and text, they have _The Dalemark Quartet_ by
          Diana Wynne
          > Jones (1995 Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's
          Literature) and _The
          > Foundation Trilogy_ by Isaac Asimov (1966 Hugo).
          >
          > Wendell Wagner
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Pauline J. Alama
          Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America s online update also listed the Mythopoeic winners. Pauline ... acceptance ... prize. By ... don t read for ...
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 13, 2003
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            Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America's online update also
            listed the Mythopoeic winners.

            Pauline

            --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, WendellWag@a... wrote:
            > I saw recently what I think is the most mainstream example of the
            acceptance
            > (in the U.S., at least) of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award as a major
            prize. By
            > "mainstream," I don't mean by the general public (many of whom
            don't read for
            > pleasure at all, and most of those who do don't read science
            fiction or
            > fantasy) or by the academic literary sorts (most of whom don't tend
            to be impressed
            > by the Hugos or the Nebulas, either). I mean the average reader of
            science
            > fiction and fantasy in the U.S. This is in the August 2003 flyer
            of the Science
            > Fiction Book Club.
            >
            > The members of the Science Fiction Book Club are a considerably
            more
            > mainstream group than the people who tend to go to science fiction
            conventions. The
            > average subscriber to the SFBC knows vaguely about cons, but has
            never been to
            > one. They probably also know vaguely about the Hugos and the
            Nebulas. It's a
            > more mainstream group than the subscribers to the science fiction
            magazines
            > also. I suspect that most members of the SFBC have never
            subscribed to a
            > science fiction magazine. About the only way that you could
            communicate with a
            > more mainstream group of science fiction and fantasy readers than
            in the SFBC
            > flyers would be to put up notices in front of every science fiction
            and fantasy
            > section in every bookstore and library in the U.S.
            >
            > In the August 2003 flyer, there's a two-page spread with the
            headlines "The
            > Cream of the Contemporary Crop," "Many are Called but Few are
            Chosen," and
            > "Whether honored with the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy or
            another
            > prestigious award, the books featured here are some of the best
            science fiction and
            > fantasy the field has to offer." The books featured and the awards
            cited are
            > _American Gods_ by Neil Gaiman (2002 Nebula and 2002 Hugo),
            _Ender's War_ by
            > Orson Scott Card (1985-6 Nebulas and 1986-7 Hugos), _Darwin's
            Radio_ by Greg Bear
            > (2000 Nebula), _In the Company of Others_ by Julie E. Czerneda
            (2001 Prix
            > Aurora), _Ship of Fools_ by Richard Paul Russo (2001 Philip K. Dick
            Award), _Dune_
            > by Frank Herbert (1965 Nebula and 1966 Hugo), _Stranger in a
            Strange Land_ by
            > Robert Heinlein (1962 Hugo), _The Moon is a Harsh Mistress_ by
            Robert
            > Heinlein (1967 Hugo), and _Lord of Light_ by Roger Zelazny (1968
            Hugo). In slightly
            > bigger pictures and text, they have _The Dalemark Quartet_ by Diana
            Wynne
            > Jones (1995 Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's Literature) and
            _The
            > Foundation Trilogy_ by Isaac Asimov (1966 Hugo).
            >
            > Wendell Wagner
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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