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Re: Rowling's follow-up

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  • Pauline J. Alama
    Of course, for authors who aren t publishing serially (like Rowling) or writing for a TV series (like Straczynski), it is also possible to do the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 23, 2003
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      Of course, for authors who aren't publishing serially (like Rowling)
      or writing for a TV series (like Straczynski), it is also possible to
      do the "foreshadowing" thing by going back and putting the gun on the
      wall in Act I after you've written it into Act III. :)

      Pauline

      --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Deutsch Harrigan <lisa@h...>
      wrote:
      > This is part of what I love about Babylon 5. JMS does a lot of the
      same
      > sort of stuff. Joe claims a more famous author (Chekov) stated "If
      you
      > are going to use a gun in the third act, you must show it on the
      wall in
      > the first act. And if you show a gun in the first act, you should
      use it
      > by the third." The idea being the this foreshadowing is very
      important
      > and helps a good story be even better. As it is, in B5, throw away
      lines
      > from the early seasons are turning points in later seasons. I can
      still
      > watch episodes and catch something I missed the first dozen times.
      >
      > And, of yes, Tolkien does it too.
      >
      > What can I say, but it is the sign of a good writer who has
      actually
      > thought out the world and the story, rather than just haphazardly
      made a
      > series of books. I've heard Rowling has an outline of all seven
      books
      > and detailed knowledge of all her characters and world, and so is
      only
      > going through the fleshing out of the story when writing each book.
      And
      > it shows.
      >
      > Mythically yours,
      > Lisa
    • David S. Bratman
      ... As Lisa wrote, Tolkien did that. If you read the LOTR drafts in The History of Middle-earth you can see him doing it. For instance, he first thought of
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 23, 2003
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        At 04:30 AM 7/23/2003 , Pauline wrote:
        >Of course, for authors who aren't publishing serially (like Rowling)
        >or writing for a TV series (like Straczynski), it is also possible to
        >do the "foreshadowing" thing by going back and putting the gun on the
        >wall in Act I after you've written it into Act III. :)

        As Lisa wrote, Tolkien did that. If you read the LOTR drafts in "The
        History of Middle-earth" you can see him doing it. For instance, he first
        thought of Arwen* at the time of writing the scene where Aragorn receives
        her banner in Rohan. (This was after he'd invented Eowyn, and his first
        thought was her own - that of course she'd marry Aragorn.) Arwen's
        appearances in Rivendell were added in a later draft. Of course, when he
        first wrote the LOTR Rivendell scenes, there was no Aragorn: just Trotter
        the hobbit instead. If that had gone onto film in a weekly TV series, it
        would have taken some fast footwork to come up with anything even remotely
        resembling the LOTR we have.

        *that wasn't his original choice for her name, either.

        - David Bratman
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