Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Re: [mythsoc] language what? ....

Expand Messages
  • alexeik@aol.com
    In a message dated 6/29/3 8:07:04 PM, Mary wrote:
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 30, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      In a message dated 6/29/3 8:07:04 PM, Mary wrote:

      <<In Russian, verbs have gender: on zabyl "he forgot" but ona zabyla "she
      forgot."
      >>

      In this case, however, it's because _zabyl_ and _zabyl_ aren't really verbs
      (although derived from verb-stems) but participles, and thus grammatically
      adjectives, which automatically have gender in Slavic languages. Originally they
      would have been joined to a substantive by the verb "to be", but this has
      dropped out in Russian, leaving such sentences essentially verbless (with the verb
      "to be" understood). In other Slavic languages -- like, say, Czech -- the verb
      "to be" is still explicitly there -- _ja jsem zapomnel_ "I forgot"
      [literally, "I am having-forgotten"], masculine; _ja jsem zapomnela_ "I forgot",
      feminine.
      On the whole "Sapir-Whorf" issue, Anna Wierzbicka's books are excellent
      sources for people trying to understand how languages are fundamentally different
      and yet how translation between them is possible.
      Alexei
    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 6/30/3 6:03:28 PM, I wrote: I meant _zabyl_ and _zabyla_, of
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 30, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 6/30/3 6:03:28 PM, I wrote:

        <<In this case, however, it's because _zabyl_ and _zabyl_ aren't really
        verbs>>

        I meant _zabyl_ and _zabyla_, of course.
        Alexei
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.