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Re: [mythsoc] language what? ....

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  • dianejoy@earthlink.net
    ... From: Stolzi@aol.com Date: Sun, 29 Jun 2003 16:05:49 EDT To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [mythsoc] language what? .... Languages are fascinating.
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 30, 2003
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      Original Message:
      -----------------
      From: Stolzi@...
      Date: Sun, 29 Jun 2003 16:05:49 EDT
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] language what? ....


      Languages are fascinating.

      In Russian, verbs have gender: on zabyl "he forgot" but ona zabyla "she
      forgot."

      In Japanese, practically nothing has gender, but =adjectives= have a past
      tense. It redded, it hotted.


      Actually, there's a certain logic in that, though linguistically, I
      couldn't possibly explain it. ---djb



      The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org

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    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 6/30/3 1:43:32 AM, Diamond Proudbrook wrote:
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 30, 2003
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        In a message dated 6/30/3 1:43:32 AM, Diamond Proudbrook wrote:

        <<Risking Wendell's wrath, I will comment that one of our main writers
        (CSLewis) seemed to find the need to use a foreign word to convey a concept
        important
        to him - I refer of course to Sehnsucht.
        >>

        Indeed, that's one of the main motivations languages have for borrowing words
        from each other (as, of course, they do constantly).
        Alexei
      • alexeik@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/29/3 8:07:04 PM, Mary wrote:
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 30, 2003
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          In a message dated 6/29/3 8:07:04 PM, Mary wrote:

          <<In Russian, verbs have gender: on zabyl "he forgot" but ona zabyla "she
          forgot."
          >>

          In this case, however, it's because _zabyl_ and _zabyl_ aren't really verbs
          (although derived from verb-stems) but participles, and thus grammatically
          adjectives, which automatically have gender in Slavic languages. Originally they
          would have been joined to a substantive by the verb "to be", but this has
          dropped out in Russian, leaving such sentences essentially verbless (with the verb
          "to be" understood). In other Slavic languages -- like, say, Czech -- the verb
          "to be" is still explicitly there -- _ja jsem zapomnel_ "I forgot"
          [literally, "I am having-forgotten"], masculine; _ja jsem zapomnela_ "I forgot",
          feminine.
          On the whole "Sapir-Whorf" issue, Anna Wierzbicka's books are excellent
          sources for people trying to understand how languages are fundamentally different
          and yet how translation between them is possible.
          Alexei
        • alexeik@aol.com
          In a message dated 6/30/3 6:03:28 PM, I wrote: I meant _zabyl_ and _zabyla_, of
          Message 4 of 17 , Jun 30, 2003
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            In a message dated 6/30/3 6:03:28 PM, I wrote:

            <<In this case, however, it's because _zabyl_ and _zabyl_ aren't really
            verbs>>

            I meant _zabyl_ and _zabyla_, of course.
            Alexei
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