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Re: [mythsoc] language what? ....

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  • David S Bratman
    A few comments in the current language discussion are causing my poor brain to be confused. ... Uh, isn t Greek the language in which the New Testament was
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 28, 2003
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      A few comments in the current language discussion are causing my poor brain
      to be confused.

      At 10:06 PM 6/28/2003 -0400, Anne wrote:
      >sschaper@... writes:
      >
      > > What pronouns are used? In the NT, the pronouns used with pneuma, when
      > > referring to the pneuma hagion are always masculine or neuter, even
      > > though the noun is technically feminine.
      >
      >You are, I believe, mixing languages. "Pneuma" is Greek.

      Uh, isn't Greek the language in which the New Testament was written?


      At 07:30 PM 6/28/2003 -0500, Steve Schaper wrote:
      > > From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>
      >
      > > for each. The easiest example, to my mind, would be one related to gender
      > > and the name(s) of God. Everything is neuter in English
      >
      >In Newspeak, yes, but not in English, of which there are still a few
      >speakers around.

      Uh, what English is that? Anglo-Saxon? The "Newspeak" we've evidently
      been using since around the Norman Conquest has only one grammatical gender
      in everything except pronouns, and - except for a few conscious uses which
      are poetic or theological in origin, not grammatical at all (like "He" for
      God and "she" for ships) - nothing in English has pronoun gender unless it
      has a sex. (And sometimes, as often with discussion of animals, not even
      then.) The grammatical gender in articles, for instance, such a prominent
      feature of German and many other languages, is completely absent in English.


      At 02:00 PM 6/28/2003 -0400, Alexei wrote:

      ><<> What about "chesed"?
      >
      >What does that word mean?
      >
      >Wendell Wagner >>
      >
      >_Chesed_ is usually translated as "mercy" in liturgical and Biblical
      >contexts, but its most basic meaning is "kindness".

      Oh. Up till this moment I thought you all were writing "cheesed," as in
      "cheesed off." That being clarified, I can go on and reply to:


      At 02:21 PM 6/28/2003 -0400, Susan wrote:
      >alexeik@... writes:
      >
      > > so that one of its familiar derived
      > > forms is _chasid_ "pious one".
      >
      >Is that where "hassidim" comes from?

      with a definite "yes". "-im" is the Hebrew plural, that's all. Though in
      English we usually write one chasid, two hassidim, the Hebrew spellings are
      exactly the same except for the plural ending.


      - David Bratman
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