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Re: [mythsoc] Digest Number 1291

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  • Steve Schaper
    ... In Newspeak, yes, but not in English, of which there are still a few speakers around. ... No. Hebrew has typical genders. The names of God and the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 28, 2003
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      On Sat, 2003-06-28 at 07:59, mythsoc@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > Message: 1
      > Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 13:17:40 -0400
      > From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>
      > Subject: language what?

      > for each. The easiest example, to my mind, would be one related to gender
      > and the name(s) of God. Everything is neuter in English

      In Newspeak, yes, but not in English, of which there are still a few
      speakers around.

      > and most of our
      > Biblical God-names are either neuter (God, which has a masculine flavor by
      > tradition I suspect) or masculine (Lord, Father). But in some languages (I
      > have been told, Hebrew), there is a taste of the feminine as well.

      No. Hebrew has typical genders. The names of God and the self-revelation
      of Him are masculine. I don't know how you'd do a "taste of feminine" in
      a nominal gender.
      > >
      > > Message: 11
      > > Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2003 21:57:55 -0400
      > > From: "Ginger L. Hysell" <glzabel@...>
      > > Subject: Re: HP V opine (Target Audience?)

      > > There was a notable lack of teens at the Harry Potter opening bash.

      Not in Rochester, Minnesota. It was all ages, weighted towards teens and
      young adults.

      > Message: 4
      > Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 14:56:14 -0400
      > From: Jack <jack@...>
      > Subject: RE: HP V target audience
      >

      > Let's not overdo this idea of everyone reading Potter. My survey show only
      > about one of ten folks
      > I know who's a heavy reader is reading this book!

      Well, of course not! I finished it days ago! ;-)

      > Message: 6
      > Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2003 18:19:59 EDT
      > From: jamcconney@...
      > Subject: Re: language what?

      >
      > The Hebrew word "ruach" means "spirit" and is often taken to mean the spirit
      > of God or, in Christian terms, the Holy Spirit. It is feminine.

      What pronouns are used? In the NT, the pronouns used with pneuma, when
      referring to the pneuma hagion are always masculine or neuter, even
      though the noun is technically feminine.

      > I can't remember what the root words were that had been used in the
      > discussion -- and I used to hear it often. Sorry. But yes, exactly. What
      > about "chesed"? That is another word I hear at retreats and whatnot.
      > Another word incomplete in any translation I suspect.

      cHesed IIRC is usually translated as lovingkindness.


      --
      Steve Schaper <sschaper@...>
    • jamcconney@aol.com
      In a message dated 6/28/2003 7:31:45 PM Central Daylight Time, ... You are, I believe, mixing languages. Pneuma is Greek. Anne [Non-text portions of this
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 28, 2003
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        In a message dated 6/28/2003 7:31:45 PM Central Daylight Time,
        sschaper@... writes:

        > What pronouns are used? In the NT, the pronouns used with pneuma, when
        > referring to the pneuma hagion are always masculine or neuter, even
        > though the noun is technically feminine.
        >

        You are, I believe, mixing languages. "Pneuma" is Greek.
        Anne


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David S Bratman
        A few comments in the current language discussion are causing my poor brain to be confused. ... Uh, isn t Greek the language in which the New Testament was
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 28, 2003
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          A few comments in the current language discussion are causing my poor brain
          to be confused.

          At 10:06 PM 6/28/2003 -0400, Anne wrote:
          >sschaper@... writes:
          >
          > > What pronouns are used? In the NT, the pronouns used with pneuma, when
          > > referring to the pneuma hagion are always masculine or neuter, even
          > > though the noun is technically feminine.
          >
          >You are, I believe, mixing languages. "Pneuma" is Greek.

          Uh, isn't Greek the language in which the New Testament was written?


          At 07:30 PM 6/28/2003 -0500, Steve Schaper wrote:
          > > From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>
          >
          > > for each. The easiest example, to my mind, would be one related to gender
          > > and the name(s) of God. Everything is neuter in English
          >
          >In Newspeak, yes, but not in English, of which there are still a few
          >speakers around.

          Uh, what English is that? Anglo-Saxon? The "Newspeak" we've evidently
          been using since around the Norman Conquest has only one grammatical gender
          in everything except pronouns, and - except for a few conscious uses which
          are poetic or theological in origin, not grammatical at all (like "He" for
          God and "she" for ships) - nothing in English has pronoun gender unless it
          has a sex. (And sometimes, as often with discussion of animals, not even
          then.) The grammatical gender in articles, for instance, such a prominent
          feature of German and many other languages, is completely absent in English.


          At 02:00 PM 6/28/2003 -0400, Alexei wrote:

          ><<> What about "chesed"?
          >
          >What does that word mean?
          >
          >Wendell Wagner >>
          >
          >_Chesed_ is usually translated as "mercy" in liturgical and Biblical
          >contexts, but its most basic meaning is "kindness".

          Oh. Up till this moment I thought you all were writing "cheesed," as in
          "cheesed off." That being clarified, I can go on and reply to:


          At 02:21 PM 6/28/2003 -0400, Susan wrote:
          >alexeik@... writes:
          >
          > > so that one of its familiar derived
          > > forms is _chasid_ "pious one".
          >
          >Is that where "hassidim" comes from?

          with a definite "yes". "-im" is the Hebrew plural, that's all. Though in
          English we usually write one chasid, two hassidim, the Hebrew spellings are
          exactly the same except for the plural ending.


          - David Bratman
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