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Re: Awards nominations

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  • David Lenander
    We need to make nominations to Awards Administrator David Bratman for the Mythopoeic Fantasy and Scholarship Awards by the end of the week. There have been a
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 23, 1999
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      We need to make nominations to Awards Administrator David Bratman for the
      Mythopoeic Fantasy and Scholarship Awards by the end of the week. There have
      been a number of books mentioned in this context, particularly for the
      MFA-Adult, but I wonder if anyone can identify particular candidates which
      haven't been mentioned much. If you haven't read a book, but know that the
      author is reliable/outstanding, it's worth mentioning. Sometimes in past years
      books have been overlooked just because they were forgotten when the nominators
      were preparing their notes to David. Oftentimes books have been overlooked
      because no-one had noticed their publication. I hope to put up a list of
      potential candidates for the MFA-children's on the Once Upon a Time web-page,
      along with some comments from me, but I particularly worry about overlooking the
      Scholarship in Myth and Fantasy Studies possibilities. Anybody else able to
      mention any likely candidates?

      This week I just read _The Squire's Tale_ by ?Gerald? (or is it Gerard?) Morris,
      which I think could be a contender, and may be on my list of five nominees for
      the children's award. I'm reading Lynne Reid Banks's _Key to the Indian_, which
      doesn't especially impress me so far--but I'm not very far--and Pullman's
      _Clockwork_, which is promising, but I haven't read more than a chapter, and
      it's a short book. I'm also reading _Conversations with the Archangel_, which
      I've not seen previously mentioned, and about which I'm undecided (for the adult
      award). From the library I borrowed the newest Alvin Maker book, ?_Heartlight_,
      but I haven't had a chance to open the cover, yet.

      Has anyone read a Diane Duane novel that recently appeared in paperback (so it
      might qualify for next year's awards, but is copyrighted from '97, so it doesn't
      qualify for this year's award) that apparently features cats?



      David Lenander, Library Manager I
      Bio-Medical Library Access Services work: (612)626-3375
      Circulation, Core Collections & Reserve Desks home: (651)292-8887
      Diehl Hall/505 Essex SE fax: (612)626-2454
      University of Minnesota
      Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

      e-mail: d-lena@...
      web-page: http://www.tc.umn.edu/nlhome/m391/d-lena/BirdnBab.html
    • Diane Baker
      ... In answer, I ve got three proposals for the long list (which may make it too long!) I have not read any of these, but found then at amazon.com, so I don t
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 24, 1999
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        David Lenander wrote:
        >
        > From: "David Lenander" <d-lena@...>
        >
        > We need to make nominations to Awards Administrator David Bratman for the
        > Mythopoeic Fantasy and Scholarship Awards by the end of the week. There have
        > been a number of books mentioned in this context, particularly for the
        > MFA-Adult, but I wonder if anyone can identify particular candidates which
        > haven't been mentioned much. If you haven't read a book, but know that the
        > author is reliable/outstanding, it's worth mentioning. Sometimes in past years
        > books have been overlooked just because they were forgotten when the nominators
        > were preparing their notes to David. Oftentimes books have been overlooked because no-one had noticed their publication.

        In answer, I've got three proposals for the long list (which may make it
        too long!) I have not read any of these, but found then at amazon.com,
        so I don't know how "mythopoeic" they are. You might have comments, or
        perhaps someone's read these? Not saying they should by necessity go on
        the list, but they do sound interesting enough to get a glance and a nod
        or a toss. Check them out at amazon at least and see if you agree.

        *The Invisible Country* by Paul J. McAuley. One-author short story
        anthol, with some very interesting tales.

        Pamela Sargent. *Climb the Wind: The Story of Another America*
        ---alternative history; the American Indians unite at a crucial point in
        their history and chase the White Man around. Should satisfy those who
        like PC with their history---but also sounds interesting. I'd at least
        like to see how she portrays the American tribes, if they're
        monolithically benign or have some variations.

        Michael H. Payne *The Blood Jaguar.* This is an all-animals book cum
        quest, but the characters sound intriguing, apparently, they are all too
        human.
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