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Top 10 Things I Hate About Star Trek

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    Top 10 Things I Hate About Star Trek May be old stuff, sorry if so. Comments a bit too
    Message 1 of 5 , May 16, 2003
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      <A HREF="http://www.happyfunpundit.com/hfp/archives/000514.html"> Top 10 Things I Hate About Star Trek</A>

      May be old stuff, sorry if so. Comments a bit too discursive and profane, but
      there's some interest here for Trekkies.

      Diamond Proudbrook


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ernest S. Tomlinson
      ... Not too much. I suppose that engineering students and other such nerdy persons have been complaining about sparking consoles and chairs without seat-belts
      Message 2 of 5 , May 16, 2003
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        On Fri, 16 May 2003 10:40:37 EDT, Stolzi@... said:
        > <A HREF="http://www.happyfunpundit.com/hfp/archives/000514.html"> Top 10
        > Things I Hate About Star Trek</A>
        >
        > May be old stuff, sorry if so. Comments a bit too discursive and profane,
        > but there's some interest here for Trekkies.

        Not too much. I suppose that engineering students and other such nerdy
        persons have been complaining about sparking consoles and chairs without
        seat-belts ever since "Star Trek" debuted.

        (Apropos of nothing, how common were seat-belts in 1950? I ask because
        one of Bette Davis's most famous lines, "Fasten your seat-belts, it's
        going to be a bumpy night," dates back to _All About Eve_ in 1950, and if
        I remember my automotive history, seat-belts were very uncommon in cars
        then, certainly not standard issue.)

        The most interesting thing in the Happy Fun Pundit's list of complaints
        was the offhand remark about Federation truck drivers. It reminds me of
        what first dawned on me some years ago, that Star Trek, especially TNG
        and its successors, are essentially children's fantasy of what the
        military is like. Everyone's an officer; think of how seldom we see
        anyone (not counting the inhabitants of the various barbarous planets
        that U. S. S. Enterprise regularly visits) who is a civilian, or an
        enlisted man, or even a soldier or sailor of noncommissioned rank. We're
        often reminded that Enterprise has many hundreds on board, but who are
        they and what do they all do? How do people enlist? We know about
        "Starfleet Academy" but that's just the officers' school; it's as if the
        only way to get into the army was to apply to West Point. And of course
        everyone has a say, which is why (as Happy Fun Pundit points out) nobody
        can give an order without the whole bridge crew putting in an oar, and
        why there was one episode where Counsellor Troi (don't we find out that
        she has the rank of Lt. Commander?) sits in the captain's chair. Anyone
        can run a starship! (In an age that can build computers with souls, why
        the heck a lot of Enterprise doesn't run itself is beyond me.)

        Ernest.
        --
        Ernest S. Tomlinson / thiophene@...
        "_Attack of the Clones_ was the most scandalous cinematic waste I have
        ever seen, and remember, I've seen _The Phantom Menace_." (Ernest
        Tomlinson, shamelessly stealing from Roger Ebert's review of another
        movie)
      • Berni Phillips
        From: Ernest S. Tomlinson ... Airplanes. I would bet that the seat belt reference in the movie referred to airplane seat belts.
        Message 3 of 5 , May 16, 2003
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          From: "Ernest S. Tomlinson" <thiophene@...>

          > (Apropos of nothing, how common were seat-belts in 1950? I ask because
          > one of Bette Davis's most famous lines, "Fasten your seat-belts, it's
          > going to be a bumpy night," dates back to _All About Eve_ in 1950, and if
          > I remember my automotive history, seat-belts were very uncommon in cars
          > then, certainly not standard issue.)

          Airplanes. I would bet that the seat belt reference in the movie referred
          to airplane seat belts.

          Berni
        • Ernest S. Tomlinson
          On Fri, 16 May 2003 17:55:34 -0700, Berni Phillips ... Berni, Joan, I thought of that about ten seconds _after_ I posted that message :] I was sort of
          Message 4 of 5 , May 16, 2003
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            On Fri, 16 May 2003 17:55:34 -0700, "Berni Phillips"
            <bernip@...> said:
            >
            > From: "Ernest S. Tomlinson" <thiophene@...>
            >
            > > (Apropos of nothing, how common were seat-belts in 1950? I ask because
            > > one of Bette Davis's most famous lines, "Fasten your seat-belts, it's
            > > going to be a bumpy night," dates back to _All About Eve_ in 1950, and if
            > > I remember my automotive history, seat-belts were very uncommon in cars
            > > then, certainly not standard issue.)
            >
            > Airplanes. I would bet that the seat belt reference in the movie
            > referred
            > to airplane seat belts.

            Berni, Joan, I thought of that about ten seconds _after_ I posted that
            message :] I was sort of trying to convince myself that there weren't
            any seat-belts on Enterprise because viewers wouldn't have been too well
            acquainted with them in the '60s, but I don't think that dog hunts.

            Curiously, in a not-too-recent episode of "Enterprise", they treat with
            the business of the seat-belts again. Commander Tucker becomes obsessed
            with redesigning the Captain's chair (this was the obligatory
            strange-force-makes-the-whole-crew-start-acting-drunk episode, but rather
            well done I thought; they did a good job of magnifying idiosyncrasies
            already established in the various crewmembers, so at first it doesn't
            seem like anything's amiss) and suggests seat-belts and "inertial
            dampeners" and other things to keep the Captain secure.

            Ernest.

            P. S. Is the "Trekker" neologism established, then? I still think of it
            as a lame attempt to avoid the connotations of "Trekkie", a pejorative I
            adopt with pride. The name of a famous and funny documentary film on
            Trek fans isn't _Trekkers_. I understand there's a sequel in the works,
            by the way.

            --
            Ernest S. Tomlinson / thiophene@...
            "_Attack of the Clones_ was the most scandalous cinematic waste I have
            ever seen, and remember, I've seen _The Phantom Menace_." (Ernest
            Tomlinson, shamelessly stealing from Roger Ebert's review of another
            movie)
          • David S. Bratman
            ... I believe, though I don t have evidence to show, that even when Trek Classic was a first-run show, this peculiar absence was noted. It is said that,
            Message 5 of 5 , May 18, 2003
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              At 06:41 PM 5/16/2003 , Ernest wrote:

              >I was sort of trying to convince myself that there weren't
              >any seat-belts on Enterprise because viewers wouldn't have been too well
              >acquainted with them in the '60s, but I don't think that dog hunts.

              I believe, though I don't have evidence to show, that even when Trek
              Classic was a first-run show, this peculiar absence was noted. It is said
              that, during one shot when the actors were throwing themselves around the
              set to simulate an enemy attack, one extra did this so vigorously as to
              break an arm.

              >P. S. Is the "Trekker" neologism established, then? I still think of it
              >as a lame attempt to avoid the connotations of "Trekkie", a pejorative I
              >adopt with pride.

              My opinion is that is both: an established neologism _and_ a lame attempt
              to avoid the connotations of "Trekkie." There are two good definitions of
              "Trekkie": "All Trek fans of whom the speaker does not approve," and
              "People who call themselves Trekkers."

              - David Bratman
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