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Re: Scholarship books

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  • jchristopher@tarleton.edu
    ... David-- I don t have time to read the general scholarship (would that I did!)--and I don t understand how you read as much as you do. But I ve decided
    Message 1 of 3 , May 13, 2003
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      David L. writes:

      >Can anyone comment at all on the Scholarship books? Anyone read any good
      >general fantasy (or all fields, including studies of one or more fantasy
      >authors or works) or Inklings books--published over the past three
      >years--that haven't been mentioned here recently?

      David--

      I don't have time to read the general scholarship (would that I did!)--and
      I don't understand how you read as much as you do. But I've decided most
      of books on the Inklings Studies are too religious for our literary purpose
      (unfortunately, I'm responsible for at least two of them being there). A
      few comments on others:

      Kirk H. Beetz, _Exploring C. S. Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia_. I gave
      up after I found seven or eight biographical errors in the first chapter.
      I think Beetz must have decided those children's biographies of Lewis that
      he cites in his bibliography were accurate. I'm also turned off by his
      listing A. N. Wilson's _C. S. Lewis_ as the only adult biography.

      Margarita Carrtetero Gonzalez and Encarnacion Hidalgo Tenorio, eds.,
      _Behind the Veil of Familiarity_. Pretty good for a book of essays. David
      B. has argued that books of essays are uneven (true) and that we shouldn't
      be giving awards to them for that reason--but we have in the past.

      George Clark and Daniel Timmons, eds., _J.R. R. Tolkien and His Literary
      Resonances_. I reviewed this one for _Choice_ a couple of years ago; two
      excellent essays; one miserable one (that is, I disagree with one writer's
      understanding of the Anglo-Saxon meter that he applies to Tolkien;
      according to Tolkien's introduction to the Clark Hall translation of
      _Beowulf_, Tolkien doesn't agree with him either).

      Michael D. C. Drout, ed., _Beowulf and the Critics_. One of my favorites
      so far, but I haven't finished it yet.

      John Ryan Duncan, _The Magic Never Ends_. The book version of the TV show
      on Lewis. Nicely written, but superficial.

      Robert Ellwood, _Frodo's Quest_. Rather interesting since it is a
      Theosophist reading rather than a Christian reading--but still a religious
      work. Note Ellwood's comments about being a member of the early Mythopoeic
      Society in his last chapter. (I remember his wife, Gracia Fay, from the
      early conventions, but not Robert.)

      Candice Fredrick and Sam McBride, _Women among the Inklings_. I reviewed
      this one for _Choice_ last year. I thought it was a fairly good survey of
      the topic, although it missed some things--what about the Lewis-Barfield
      poem "Abecedarium Philosophicum" with its strong male chauvinism?

      David Graham, ed., _We Remember C. S. Lewis_. This has some interesting
      things, but it is light weight (reprinting materials from _The Canadian C.
      S. Lewis Journal_).

      Don W. King, _C. S. Lewis, Poet_. One of my favorites. I don't agree with
      King everywhere (as his endnotes show, he doesn't agree with me also), but
      it's an excellent overall survey. I think Lewis's poetry is better than
      King does; however, this will be the basic starting place for future
      studies of the poetry.

      [Skipping because I'm running out of time.]

      Peter J. Schakel, _Imagination and the Arts in C. S. Lewis_. Another of my
      favorites. It has that defense of reading the Chronicles of Narnia in
      publication order that appeared in _Mythlore_ last year. A valuable
      discussion of Lewis's imagination.

      [Sorry, out of time.]

      --Joe
    • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      But I ve decided most of books on the Inklings Studies are too religious for our literary purpose (unfortunately, I m responsible for at least two of them
      Message 2 of 3 , May 13, 2003
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        But I've decided most
        of books on the Inklings Studies are too religious for our literary purpose
        (unfortunately, I'm responsible for at least two of them being there). >>

        ? From my admittedly limited frame of reference, I'd have guessed that the
        religion/Inkling connection is very much the point for many. If not
        specifically to follow the philosophy of a particular Inkling, and I almost
        hope that is not the limit of the thing, than for perhaps a sense of
        meaning to Story.

        Bruderhof had an interesting link on the subject recently. Let me paste it
        in below. It can speak better than I.

        << My Daughter's Crayons
        Tim Keiderling

        �Daddy, I want to color!� These are the first words out of my daughter�s
        mouth every day when she dashes in our front door after kindergarten. I can
        tell she has something in her mind that needs to get on paper. She doesn�t
        have time to take off her jacket or sit down, or even go to the bathroom.

        Watching my daughter, I have come to believe that my college psychology
        teacher was wrong. The fundamental human drive � what it is that we most
        want to do and need to do � is not to have sex, nor to have power. It is to
        create. That�s what �soul� is. That�s what makes us human.

        To create is to be happy. The only unhappy ones among us are those who lost
        their crayons somewhere along the way.

        What is life anyway, if it isn't a clean sheet of white paper?

        � 2003 Bruderhof Communities >>

        There was a link in there, but it got lost as my text went Text-Only. It
        still doesn't quite say what I mean. Thinking of Wheaton College and
        beyond here.


        Lizzie Triano
        lizziewriter@...
        amor vincit omnia
      • Croft, Janet B
        Having looked at some of the books Joe was talking about, I would say that the books in question are not about the intersection of religion and literature for
        Message 3 of 3 , May 13, 2003
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          Having looked at some of the books Joe was talking about, I would say that
          the books in question are not about the intersection of religion and
          literature for the Inklings, but rather on other religious topics, such as
          how the reader can use the Inklings' books in their own spiritual growth, or
          solely about an individual Inkling's religious life and apologetics but not
          about their mythopoeic literature. The Mythopoeic Awards are for works that
          "make a signifigant contribution to scholarship about the Inklings and the
          genres of myth and fantasy studies." So while something just on the
          religious life of the Inklings could be considered, I think something that
          connected this to his literary output would be of more interest to the
          committee.

          I like the story, though!

          Janet

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano [mailto:lizziewriter@...]
          > Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 1:45 PM
          > To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Re: Scholarship books
          >
          >
          > But I've decided most
          > of books on the Inklings Studies are too religious for our
          > literary purpose (unfortunately, I'm responsible for at least
          > two of them being there). >>
          >
          > ? From my admittedly limited frame of reference, I'd have
          > guessed that the religion/Inkling connection is very much the
          > point for many. If not specifically to follow the philosophy
          > of a particular Inkling, and I almost hope that is not the
          > limit of the thing, than for perhaps a sense of meaning to Story.
          >
          > Bruderhof had an interesting link on the subject recently.
          > Let me paste it
          > in below. It can speak better than I.
          >
          > << My Daughter's Crayons
          > Tim Keiderling
          >
          > "Daddy, I want to color!" These are the first words out of my
          > daughter's mouth every day when she dashes in our front door
          > after kindergarten. I can tell she has something in her mind
          > that needs to get on paper. She doesn't have time to take off
          > her jacket or sit down, or even go to the bathroom.
          >
          > Watching my daughter, I have come to believe that my college
          > psychology teacher was wrong. The fundamental human drive -
          > what it is that we most want to do and need to do - is not to
          > have sex, nor to have power. It is to create. That's what
          > "soul" is. That's what makes us human.
          >
          > To create is to be happy. The only unhappy ones among us are
          > those who lost their crayons somewhere along the way.
          >
          > What is life anyway, if it isn't a clean sheet of white paper?
          >
          > (c) 2003 Bruderhof Communities >>
          >
          > There was a link in there, but it got lost as my text went
          > Text-Only. It still doesn't quite say what I mean. Thinking
          > of Wheaton College and beyond here.
          >
          >
          > Lizzie Triano
          > lizziewriter@...
          > amor vincit omnia
          >
          >
          >
          >
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