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Cautionary tales WAS RE: [mythsoc] Re: "Owls?" you ask...

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Steve sang
    Message 1 of 5 , May 13, 2003
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      Steve sang

      << ...Don't-Care was put in a pot
      And boiled till he was done >>

      Oh wouldn't it be dreadful to lose all the cautionaries and their
      relatives? Maurice Sendak has illustrated a lovely little copy of a
      similiar tale about "Pierre" who didn't care.

      Has anyone read those books I am seeing at the supermarket? The series of
      Unfortunate Events I think it might be called ?

      One of my favorite books as a child was a book of silly poems that may have
      been called How to Fry your Sister, or maybe that was just one of the
      poems. It had the Little Willy poems, or at least some of them, among
      other dreadful things. But I enjoyed them ever so much and I bet they
      scanned better than most of today's carefully-written-sweet-and-careful
      ones. It was the property of the elementary school library and that was
      the last time I ever saw it, so it's been a while.

      As for the river versus name thing... I'm still not convinced they aren't
      using Taffy as a generic Welsh name, like Paddy for an Irishman.

      And if you ask me, textbooks have always been the WORST things to read.
      Maybe now I am finding out why. The powers that be try very very hard to
      make sure nothing good gets in. That's why you always ask teachers and
      librarians what else there is to read. I am forever indebted to the 11th
      grade teacher who recommended The Song of Roland and Tristan and Iseult.
      Beat _All Quiet on the Western Front_ all to heck.

      Lizzie Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
    • Croft, Janet B
      I read the first one recently -- it was rather enjoyable in an Edward Gorey/ Charles Addams sort of way. I know some kids who love them almost as much as the
      Message 2 of 5 , May 13, 2003
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        I read the first one recently -- it was rather enjoyable in an Edward Gorey/
        Charles Addams sort of way. I know some kids who love them almost as much
        as the Harry Potter books. A quick read, not very deep, but ghoulish fun.

        Janet Croft

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano [mailto:lizziewriter@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 8:11 AM
        To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Cautionary tales WAS RE: [mythsoc] Re: "Owls?" you ask...



        Has anyone read those books I am seeing at the supermarket? The series of
        Unfortunate Events I think it might be called ?






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      • alexeik@aol.com
        In a message dated 5/13/3 1:04:59 PM, Lizzie wrote:
        Message 3 of 5 , May 13, 2003
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          In a message dated 5/13/3 1:04:59 PM, Lizzie wrote:

          <<I'm still not convinced they aren't
          using Taffy as a generic Welsh name, like Paddy for an Irishman.>>

          They are. "Taffy" (from _Dafydd_, caricaturing a Welsh accent in English that
          replaces initial voiced stops with their voiceless equivalents -- cf.
          Shakespeare's Fluellen) is a generic name for a Welshman, exactly like
          "Paddy" for an Irishman, and often used in a derogatory way (eg, "bloody
          Taff"). If you ever watch the Alec Guinness movie _A Run for the Money_,
          which is all about Welsh stereotypes, you'll get an earful of such usage.
          Alexei
        • dimwoo
          Alexei wrote: Taffy (from _Dafydd_, caricaturing a Welsh accent in English that replaces initial voiced stops with their voiceless equivalents -- cf.
          Message 4 of 5 , May 13, 2003
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            Alexei wrote:
            "Taffy" (from _Dafydd_, caricaturing a Welsh accent in English that
            replaces initial voiced stops with their voiceless equivalents -- cf.
            Shakespeare's Fluellen) is a generic name for a Welshman, exactly
            like "Paddy" for an Irishman, and often used in a derogatory way
            (eg, "bloody > Taff")."

            There definitely is a River Taff that runs from the Breacon Beacons
            to Cardiff Bay. I'm sure it's more than coincidence (although
            increasingly off-topic).


            Steve Law
          • alexeik@aol.com
            In a message dated 5/13/3 9:21:41 PM, Steve Law wrote: It s the river
            Message 5 of 5 , May 14, 2003
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              In a message dated 5/13/3 9:21:41 PM, Steve Law wrote:

              <<There definitely is a River Taff that runs from the Breacon Beacons

              to Cardiff Bay>>

              It's the river Taf (pronounced "Tahv"); its name is a variant of that of the
              Thames. The surface resemblance to "Taffy" is coincidental.
              Alexei
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