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Re: F. Marion Crawford

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  • Juliet Blosser
    ... Interestingly (and this is far off topic), I went to school in Marion, IN, which is named for the same Swamp Fox.
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 7, 1999
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      > Thomas Crawford is known for his equestrian statue of George Washington (in
      > Richmond, VA) so I guess it's possible he named his son for the "Swamp Fox"
      > of Revolutionary War fame. (I obviously date myself by noting my
      > familiarity with that hero via the television series starring Leslie
      > Nielson..... pre-"Airplane", of course).

      Interestingly (and this is far off topic), I went to school in Marion, IN,
      which is named for the same Swamp Fox.
    • Stolzi@xxx.xxx
      Thanks for the info on Crawford! I grew up in Swamp Fox country, myself (before the TV show) and learned about the hero from a book on him by Merritt Parmelee
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 8, 1999
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        Thanks for the info on Crawford!

        I grew up in Swamp Fox country, myself (before the TV show) and learned about
        the hero from a book on him by Merritt Parmelee Allen, who reduced many
        historic American heroes into exciting fiction for young people.

        Wendell, I can't tell if that was FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS you read without more
        identifying details. The Peppers may well have spoken of their "ship coming
        in," but I don't happen to recall it.

        Mary S
      • Stolzi@xxx.xxx
        Yes, F. M. Crawford is not one whose work deserves to survive, I agree. However I like, sometimes, to read the old popular stuff from the turn of the century
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 8, 1999
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          Yes, F. M. Crawford is not one whose work deserves to survive, I agree.

          However I like, sometimes, to read the old popular stuff from the turn of the
          century or thereabouts (certainly more than I like to read the popular stuff
          of today).

          When we lived in the Washington DC area, we went to Shrinemont one summer.
          Shrinemont is the retreat and camp center of the Episcopal Diocese of
          Virginia, which the Diocese created by purchasing an old resort hotel up in
          the mountains, a hotel surviving from the days before air conditioning, when
          no one of any means spent the hot, humid summers in DC.

          Besides the hotel, there were some large cabins, and we stayed in one of
          these once. It had been fitted out with wall after wall of bookshelves.
          Washingtonians had gone up there year after year with their summer reading,
          and left the books behind as donations. My dream was to be able to stay up
          there for six weeks or so, just enjoying the mountain air and reading all
          these period-piece books by Helen Hunt Jackson or Mary Johnston or whoever,
          or the theological works both serious and romantic, or the non-fiction tomes
          based on views of the world which have gone forever. The same kind of books
          that turn up in the many antique stores around here, where I suppose people
          buy them just to make their "country" decor look authentic and never -read-
          them.

          Mary S
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