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Re: Elsie Dinsmore ?

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  • Stolzi@xxx.xxx
    I am rather aghast at Christian homeschoolers of today exposing their children to Elsie Dinsmore s Mammy Chloe, who wears a spotless turban (of course) and is
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 7, 1999
      I am rather aghast at Christian homeschoolers of today exposing their
      children to Elsie Dinsmore's Mammy Chloe, who wears a spotless turban (of
      course) and is given to remarks like "Bress de Lawd, Ah knows Jesus loves
      =me=, too, jes' the same as if Ah wuz white." Mammy Chloe can't even pore
      over the Bible herself - Elsie has to read it to her.

      I suppose the Girl of the Limberlost needed money for suitable clothes and
      also transportation - didn't she live a long way from the high school? And I
      think maybe in the old days you had to buy your textbooks even if the
      education was free.

      We were given ours, but had to turn 'em in at the end of the year, so some
      got more battered books than others. We were also given, and required to
      use, a set of fold-and-stick brown paper book covers printed up by the State;
      I find that graven in my memory forever is the lead motto (for State Parks, I
      guess) "Education and Recreation in the School of the Great Outdoors."

      Never thought 'til now of the irony of reading this over and over as we sat
      firmly imprisoned in the School of =Indoors=.

      Mary S
    • Stolzi@xxx.xxx
      Since we are wandering somewhat afield just now, I ll mention F. Marion Crawford. Just finished an oldie I picked up in a local antique barn for 5 bucks. It s
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 7, 1999
        Since we are wandering somewhat afield just now, I'll mention F. Marion
        Crawford.

        Just finished an oldie I picked up in a local antique barn for 5 bucks. It's
        THE WHITE SISTER by F. Marion Crawford, pub. 1912. Such a sentimental and
        romantical brew, ala =Beau Geste=! The frontispiece is a picture of some
        well-known actress of the time in the role of The White Sister.

        Looked up Crawford on the 'net and it turns out he is remembered today only
        for shockers, ghost-stories and the like ("The Screaming Skull" is one of his
        top titles). One of the pages where I learned this is a set of links with
        the engaging title "Gaslight Fiction" - this seems to cover everything from
        shlockmeisters like Crawford to =real= writers of the period such as
        Turgenev, Chekhov, or de Maupassant. I wonder who he was. "Francis Marion"
        are two good first names for a South Carolinian.

        Mary S
      • WendellWag@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 12/6/99 5:07:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, Stolzi@aol.com ... Is this the book I think I remember? I probably read this somewhere between
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 8, 1999
          In a message dated 12/6/99 5:07:13 PM Eastern Standard Time, Stolzi@...
          writes:

          > I hope David's not putting FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS in the same bag.
          > It has spunky children with some interesting obstacles to overcome.
          > Unfortunately, in the first book, they really overcome them all (by
          > being adopted into the family of a rich gentleman) and the sequels
          > never measure up, in my opinion. . . I owned the first book as a
          > child and read it with great interest, being an only child myself and
          > not having any intimate acquaintance with the kind of hardscrabble
          > poverty described in FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS.

          Is this the book I think I remember? I probably read this somewhere between
          1960 and 1962. By that point it was way out of fashion, so it was probably
          something that my mother had read as a child and had sitting around. Even
          then I found the idea that your best hope of getting out of poverty was to be
          adopted by a rich man to be strange. I can't call my family poor, more like
          struggling working-class. My father made enough working a job and a half
          that we might have been middle-class if my parents hadn't been silly enough
          to have eight kids.

          If I'm remembering the right book, I found it funny when the kids in that
          book talked about how "someday our ship will come in". I had never heard
          that phrase before (in the meaning of "someday we'll make our fortune"). I
          thought that was hilarious. I remember telling my mother, "Mom, our ship
          just came in. Unfortunately, it hit the side of the pier and sank." Boy, I
          was one snide, cynical little kid. But then I'm also one snide, cynical
          adult.
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