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Re: [mythsoc] Austen, Aristocracy, and Regular Joes

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    In a message dated 3/28/2003 12:22:47 PM Central Standard Time, ... There was a little bit of this in the older Southern culture. I was always taught that it
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 28, 2003
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      In a message dated 3/28/2003 12:22:47 PM Central Standard Time,
      alexeik@... writes:


      > It is this kind of consciousness that keeps _noblesse_ alive as a
      > sociocultural phenomenon even when its members no longer enjoy political
      > supremacy or even wealth: they continue to have a "special" identity based
      > on
      > the *stories* about their lineage that they inherit through their
      > bloodline.
      >

      There was a little bit of this in the older Southern culture. I was always
      taught that it was not how much money you had which made your family a "good"
      family, but your standards and your heritage. This was natural in a society
      where many white Southerners had lost everything they had in war,
      Reconstruction, and then just when people might be picking themselves up
      again, the Great Depression.

      Though my =own= family were neither white-trash nor white-columns, but rather
      professionals (doctors, engineers) or farmers working their land. I even
      remember thinking that my in-laws were a bit flashy, a bit nouveau-riche -
      they were quite prosperous as a pair of professionals (when working wives
      were not so common) in the rising tide of the 1960's - and they were enjoying
      it!


      Diamond Proudbrook



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/29/3 12:01:49 AM, Diamond Proudbrook wrote:
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 29, 2003
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        In a message dated 3/29/3 12:01:49 AM, Diamond Proudbrook wrote:

        <<There was a little bit of this in the older Southern culture. I was always
        taught that it was not how much money you had which made your family a "good"
        family, but your standards and your heritage. >>

        Interesting, as Southerners were the Americans with whom the old-style French
        aristocracy shared enough core values to feel comfortable dealing with them
        as equal partners, to the point of intermarriage. I have American cousins on
        my maternal side, and they're all descended from marriages made by French
        ancestors in the 19th century. And they're all Southerners.
        Alexei
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