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Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and faith/literature ingeneral

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Would you present an example or two to illustrate what you mean? asked Paul Labaki, reasonably enough. OK, here s one, just off the top of my head... the
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 15, 2003
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      Would you present an example or two to illustrate what you mean? >>asked
      Paul Labaki, reasonably enough.

      OK, here's one, just off the top of my head...

      the sense of lingering quiet as a given, whether upon entering a church, a
      library, or a summer or rainy afternoon. Between more relaxed conventions
      (?) at churches that seem to have a constant state of quiet chatter on any
      standard day (before church on Sundays, type of standard day I mean), and
      ditto for libraries.... electronics have become so inexpensive that they
      truly are ubiquitous... not just young people and their games but adults
      and their Nextels. There are quiet seconds here and there but I think the
      sense of quiet that could be captured in a few words by earlier writers,
      and understood easily by their readers, that whole mood is alien to most
      readers, or at least most readers born since, say, color TV? Very loosely
      speaking.

      Without this quiet, there is a real lack of time for wool-gathering and
      other important activities. Or maybe, and I'm sure, kids today can
      wool-gather in the midst of this electronic brouhaha.

      Any sense of lineage, authority by hierarchy, etc., is pretty much a lost
      deal also. Between the various "authorities" who have betrayed their trust
      (whether church officials or Enron guys or whatever) and the amount of time
      it's been since the British Empire was a place where the sun never set...
      for whatever reasons about the only place you'll find any "true heir" type
      quest is probably an Arthurian legend. So how can this sense of heir-ness
      (so sacred with Aragorn, for example) have any power any more?

      Patience and frugality. Nowadays, if you save your money for something, by
      the time you have the money, the product probably no longer exists.

      I get a sense of, hm, discontinuity today, and evanescence ? (sp?). I get
      this sense that young people almost have to be so caught up in the moment
      (learning every single new complicated electronic toy Or even tool) that
      how can they learn history? And then if they Do learn history... this
      group says the Holocaust never happened... that group says, we never landed
      on the Moon, this other group says, (honest, I saw this stance in print)
      that humans and dinosaurs coexisted.

      You think I'm exaggerating about the five questions per page... I can
      explain what a colony was, or that people left somewhere because of
      religious reasons. But Why? And so many other ineffable things that I
      just can't tie to anything in today's life. I am sorry I can't give more
      examples. Slowly I'm getting back into reading but I'm very behind, and I
      do feel the need to have one foot in my kids' world, not both feet in the
      mythic lit world, because how else can I be a bridge between the two?

      Did I make much sense ?

      Lizzie Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
    • SusanPal@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/15/2003 9:40:25 AM Pacific Standard Time, ... Yes -- this is why I hate contemporary worship at my church (I call it The Gospel According
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 15, 2003
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        In a message dated 3/15/2003 9:40:25 AM Pacific Standard Time,
        lizziewriter@... writes:


        > Without this quiet, there is a real lack of time for wool-gathering and
        > other important activities. Or maybe, and I'm sure, kids today can
        > wool-gather in the midst of this electronic brouhaha.
        >

        Yes -- this is why I hate contemporary worship at my church (I call it "The
        Gospel According to MTV"), whereas other people -- not necessarily younger --
        love it and find the more traditional, meditative Rite I and Rite II
        services too slow and boring.

        Susan


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • darancgrissom@sbcglobal.net
        ... From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, March 15, 2003 9:45 AM Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 16, 2003
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, March 15, 2003 9:45 AM
          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and faith/literature ingeneral

          the sense of lingering quiet as a given, whether upon entering a church, a
          library, or a summer or rainy afternoon. Between more relaxed conventions
          (?) at churches that seem to have a constant state of quiet chatter on any
          standard day (before church on Sundays, type of standard day I mean), and
          ditto for libraries.... electronics have become so inexpensive that they
          truly are ubiquitous... not just young people and their games but adults
          and their Nextels. There are quiet seconds here and there but I think the
          sense of quiet that could be captured in a few words by earlier writers,
          and understood easily by their readers, that whole mood is alien to most
          readers, or at least most readers born since, say, color TV? Very loosely
          speaking.

          Without this quiet, there is a real lack of time for wool-gathering and
          other important activities. Or maybe, and I'm sure, kids today can
          wool-gather in the midst of this electronic brouhaha.

          There are still quiet places in the world where one may think. They are just harder to find these days. My High school library was always silent. The botanical gardens down the street form my house are quiet. But finding time to enjoy them is the hard part. so many demands on our time from a society that is trying very hard not to think about what it is doing, and what it might mean. Most people don't want to stop and ponder the world, because it's depressing for them. Idon't mind if they want to work themselves to death, but I want to smell my roses. I mean later in the year when they bloom.
          DCG

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David S. Bratman
          Lizzie writes about how a sense of lingering quiet is sorely endangered in today s world. True, but is this supposed to be something new? People have been
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 17, 2003
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            Lizzie writes about how a sense of lingering quiet is sorely endangered in
            today's world.

            True, but is this supposed to be something new? People have been
            complaining since at least the 17th century that life has been getting too
            fast and complicated.

            Are trains considered slow and peaceful today? They were veritable speed
            demons in the eyes of any of Jane Austen's contemporaries who lived to see
            them. People were seriously afraid that it would be impossible to breathe
            in air rushing by at 35 mph. Model T cars, propeller airplanes, early
            telephones - all these symbols of nostalgia were the latest and greatest
            cutting-edge technology.

            _The Hobbit_ begins with a description of how the story happened long ago,
            when the world had piece and quiet. That longing of Tolkien's is hardly
            outdated.

            You want complaints about the younger generation's fall in behavior
            standards? The Greeks had it.

            Rather than an example of how life has changed, this example shows rather,
            as the French proverb has it, that life has stayed the same.

            In any case, the "eternal verity" here is the need for lingering quiet.
            We've always needed that, and always will. And in a fast-paced world, we
            go to great lengths to seek it out - see all those ads for distant
            vacations, all those columns about the joys of turning off your cell phone.

            A mythopoeic writer today might want to express the contrast with some
            up-to-date references to the state of technology, but the main point hasn't
            changed. Narnia is as different from the England of 1940 as it is from the
            England of 1890, as it is from the England of today.

            - David Bratman
          • Paul F. Labaki
            From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano Reply-To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Date: Sat, 15 Mar 2003 12:45:01 -0500 To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 23, 2003
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              From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>
              Reply-To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sat, 15 Mar 2003 12:45:01 -0500
              To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and faith/literature
              ingeneral


              Would you present an example or two to illustrate what you mean? >>asked
              Paul Labaki, reasonably enough.

              OK, here's one, just off the top of my head...

              the sense of lingering quiet as a given, whether upon entering a church, a
              library, or a summer or rainy afternoon. Between more relaxed conventions
              (?) at churches that seem to have a constant state of quiet chatter on any
              standard day (before church on Sundays, type of standard day I mean), and
              ditto for libraries.... electronics have become so inexpensive that they
              truly are ubiquitous... not just young people and their games but adults
              and their Nextels. There are quiet seconds here and there but I think the
              sense of quiet that could be captured in a few words by earlier writers,
              and understood easily by their readers, that whole mood is alien to most
              readers, or at least most readers born since, say, color TV? Very loosely
              speaking.

              Without this quiet, there is a real lack of time for wool-gathering and
              other important activities. Or maybe, and I'm sure, kids today can
              wool-gather in the midst of this electronic brouhaha.

              You may be right about losing some of these experiences, and, by
              extrapolation, the values that made them possible for earlier generations.
              You've got me thinking.

              Any sense of lineage, authority by hierarchy, etc., is pretty much a lost
              deal also. Between the various "authorities" who have betrayed their trust
              (whether church officials or Enron guys or whatever) and the amount of time
              it's been since the British Empire was a place where the sun never set...
              for whatever reasons about the only place you'll find any "true heir" type
              quest is probably an Arthurian legend. So how can this sense of heir-ness
              (so sacred with Aragorn, for example) have any power any more?

              Patience and frugality. Nowadays, if you save your money for something, by
              the time you have the money, the product probably no longer exists.

              I get a sense of, hm, discontinuity today, and evanescence ? (sp?). I get
              this sense that young people almost have to be so caught up in the moment
              (learning every single new complicated electronic toy Or even tool) that
              how can they learn history? And then if they Do learn history... this
              group says the Holocaust never happened... that group says, we never landed
              on the Moon, this other group says, (honest, I saw this stance in print)
              that humans and dinosaurs coexisted.

              You think I'm exaggerating about the five questions per page... I can
              explain what a colony was, or that people left somewhere because of
              religious reasons. But Why? And so many other ineffable things that I
              just can't tie to anything in today's life. I am sorry I can't give more
              examples. Slowly I'm getting back into reading but I'm very behind, and I
              do feel the need to have one foot in my kids' world, not both feet in the
              mythic lit world, because how else can I be a bridge between the two?

              Did I make much sense ?

              You do, Lizzie. May I suggest that if you are not familiar with it you
              treat yourself to Bridge to Teribithia? Your children, at least the seven
              year old, will probably be ready for it shortly, if not already. This one
              the Newberry, somewhere around 1978 or 1979. Its a short quick read so it
              won't put you behind much more than you already are.
              Lizzie Triano
              lizziewriter@...
              amor vincit omnia

              Peace,
              Paul Labaki




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            • WendellWag@aol.com
              Paul, I hate to sound picky, but I m utterly lost as to what in your post is a quote from Lizzie and what is your reply to her. I ve noticed this with several
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 23, 2003
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                Paul, I hate to sound picky, but I'm utterly lost as to what in your post is
                a quote from Lizzie and what is your reply to her. I've noticed this with
                several people now. Please, when you quote someone, pick some consistent way
                of indicating what is your own writing and what is quoted from the person
                you're replying to. I know that you know what's what and perhaps the person
                you're replying to knows what's what, but frequently people who aren't
                careful about this confuse everybody else.

                Wendell Wagner
              • Paul F. Labaki
                Me too, Susan, but I am finding this Lent that the services celebrating the stations of the cross or the Passion of Christ have been solemn, reverent and
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 23, 2003
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                  Me too, Susan, but I am finding this Lent that the services celebrating the
                  "stations of the cross" or the Passion of Christ have been solemn,
                  reverent and silent, this year. Really prayerful. I've been to 2 different
                  parishes and have observed the same thing at both.
                  Peace,
                  Paul Labaki

                  From: SusanPal@...
                  Reply-To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Sat, 15 Mar 2003 15:19:39 EST
                  To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and faith/literature
                  ingeneral


                  In a message dated 3/15/2003 9:40:25 AM Pacific Standard Time,
                  lizziewriter@... writes:


                  > Without this quiet, there is a real lack of time for wool-gathering and
                  > other important activities. Or maybe, and I'm sure, kids today can
                  > wool-gather in the midst of this electronic brouhaha.
                  >

                  Yes -- this is why I hate contemporary worship at my church (I call it "The
                  Gospel According to MTV"), whereas other people -- not necessarily younger
                  --
                  love it and find the more traditional, meditative Rite I and Rite II
                  services too slow and boring.

                  Susan


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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                  27:HM/A=1430287/R=0/id=flashurl/*http://www.poetry.com/contest/contest.asp?S
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                  <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .




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                • SusanPal@aol.com
                  In a message dated 3/23/2003 4:51:04 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... Yes, we have solemn stations of the cross too (and the contemporary-worship services for
                  Message 8 of 17 , Mar 23, 2003
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                    In a message dated 3/23/2003 4:51:04 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                    sheik@... writes:


                    > Me too, Susan, but I am finding this Lent that the services celebrating the
                    > "stations of the cross" or the Passion of Christ have been solemn,
                    > reverent and silent, this year.

                    Yes, we have solemn "stations of the cross" too (and the contemporary-worship
                    services for Lent at least remove all the alleluias!). But a lot of the
                    folks who enjoy contemporary worship *don't* come to Holy Week services,
                    because the darkness isn't their cup of tea. And at that point, I start
                    wondering what's getting lost in terms of the spiritual experience.

                    Oh well. Listen to me -- I've only been in the church for four years, and I
                    sound like a hidebound 1929-Prayer-Book traditionalist!

                    Susan


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • jamcconney@aol.com
                    In a message dated 3/23/2003 7:27:02 PM Central Standard Time, ... Yes! I ve always been very moved by the fact that the only service that allows an alleluia!
                    Message 9 of 17 , Mar 23, 2003
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                      In a message dated 3/23/2003 7:27:02 PM Central Standard Time,
                      SusanPal@... writes:

                      > Yes, we have solemn "stations of the cross" too (and the
                      > contemporary-worship
                      > services for Lent at least remove all the alleluias!).

                      Yes! I've always been very moved by the fact that the only service that
                      allows an alleluia! during Lent is a funeral service.
                      "All of us go down to the dust; yet even at the grave we make our song:
                      Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia." (BCP pp 483 and 499)
                      I've also heard that some congregations, after the "earth to earth,
                      ashes to ashes, dust to dust" are adding "light to Light." Nice, I
                      think--but I gave up being a traditionalist awhile back.

                      Anne


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • SusanPal@aol.com
                      In a message dated 3/23/2003 6:23:10 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... I think that s nice too! I enjoy some nontraditional wording (I adore, and own, the New
                      Message 10 of 17 , Mar 23, 2003
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                        In a message dated 3/23/2003 6:23:10 PM Pacific Standard Time,
                        jamcconney@... writes:


                        >
                        > I've also heard that some congregations, after the "earth to earth,
                        > ashes to ashes, dust to dust" are adding "light to Light." Nice, I
                        > think--but I gave up being a traditionalist awhile back.
                        >

                        I think that's nice too! I enjoy some nontraditional wording (I adore, and
                        own, the New Zealand Prayer Book, for instance), but I don't tend to like
                        contemporary music, and our "contemporary" liturgy only includes two
                        Scripture readings -- Gospel and one other -- which bothers me.

                        Adding MORE words doesn't tend to ruffle my feathers, but removing words
                        does!

                        Susan


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Ernest Tomlinson
                        ... From: To: Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2003 5:26 PM Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and
                        Message 11 of 17 , Mar 23, 2003
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                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: <SusanPal@...>
                          To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2003 5:26 PM
                          Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and faith/literature
                          ingeneral


                          > Oh well. Listen to me -- I've only been in the church for four years, and
                          I
                          > sound like a hidebound 1929-Prayer-Book traditionalist!

                          This is a problem?

                          Ernest Tomlinson (more than a year shy of thirty, not even _in_ a church
                          yet. But anyone who knows me well knows that I approach life with the
                          fundamental assumption that change is for the worse, making room for
                          exceptions where appropriate.)
                        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                          Paul said,
                          Message 12 of 17 , Mar 24, 2003
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                            Paul said, << You do, Lizzie. May I suggest that if you are not familiar
                            with it you treat yourself to Bridge to Teribithia? Your children, at least
                            the seven year old, will probably be ready for it shortly, if not already.
                            This one the Newberry, somewhere around 1978 or 1979. Its a short quick
                            read so it won't put you behind much more than you already are. >>

                            Thanks Paul, it looks good on Amazon (Terabithia I think is the correct
                            spelling). I have enjoyed a number of Newberry books although not all, and
                            Caldecotts are often good bets too. And I'm glad I made sense. Whew !

                            I am also supposed to be looking for books by William Steig, for example
                            Dr. DeSoto. Course actually getting to the BOOKSTORE is another matter.
                            And I can't just order half-a-dozen books on Amazon. I want to look and
                            pick (and ask B&N to order something else for me while I'm there).

                            It is good to have these recommendations. Number-One-Son has just
                            discovered Ricky Ricotta and while I"m happy to have him enjoy reading, I'd
                            like to squeeze some mythic goodies in there too. lol

                            I will pass on Stations though (of the Cross).

                            I have the first two of those books by Jody Bergsma (I think), autographed
                            by the author and all, from Dancing Dragon catalog. We haven't read them
                            yet though, or not much of them. Has anyone else read them and should I go
                            ahead and order the third one? I am concerned that by the time we read the
                            first two all the way through the second may not be available in the same
                            format.

                            There was also a sweet book by another author called, I believe (the book
                            not the author) The Minstrel and the Dragon Pup.

                            ME I am looking for more Edith the Lonely Doll books by Dare Wright. I
                            have the first two.

                            Lizzie Triano
                            lizziewriter@...
                            amor vincit omnia
                          • Max Rible
                            ... If you want to get someone started on history, I highly recommend Larry Gonick s Cartoon History of the Universe series, currently collected in three big
                            Message 13 of 17 , Mar 24, 2003
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                              On Sun, 2003-03-23 at 16:40, Paul F. Labaki wrote:
                              > I get a sense of, hm, discontinuity today, and evanescence ? (sp?). I get
                              > this sense that young people almost have to be so caught up in the moment
                              > (learning every single new complicated electronic toy Or even tool) that
                              > how can they learn history?

                              If you want to get someone started on history, I highly recommend
                              Larry Gonick's "Cartoon History of the Universe" series, currently
                              collected in three big volumes. He does a very good job of making
                              history interesting and funny at the same time; he also keeps a
                              spotlight on the cause and effect that is the important flow of
                              history-- something that the usual dreary grade-school parade of
                              names, dates, and events leaves out.

                              The thing that got me started in studying history and classics
                              was role-playing games. One of them, "Ars Magica", is set in the
                              Middle Ages as people thought they were at the time-- Aristotelian
                              physics included. Not enough monsters written up for the game?
                              Just hit Pliny the Elder's _Natural History_ for numerous bizarre
                              ideas. (Historical bestiaries are invariably weirder than the
                              things people make up for modern games.) Need adventure ideas?
                              Check the timeline. Just what *are* the characters going to do when
                              the Mongol hordes or the Crusades are passing through their area?

                              Our long-standing Ars Magica game is over, but we've got a
                              secret-history-conspiracy-time-travel game going now, and you
                              have to understand the mundane history in order to understand
                              what the fantastic history's about. Our world's history
                              really does hang on some interesting turning points.

                              Speaking of Aristotelian physics, I heartily recommend Richard
                              Garfinkel's _Celestial Matters_, which is a hard science fiction
                              novel where the science is Aristotelian.
                              --
                              %% Max Rible % slothman@... % www.amurgsval.org/~slothman/ %%
                              %% "Before enlightenment: sharpen claws, catch mice. %%
                              %% After enlightenment: sharpen claws, catch mice." %%
                            • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                              Max s comments (and I know I m behind in thanking people): If you want to get someone started on history, I highly recommend Larry Gonick s Cartoon History of
                              Message 14 of 17 , Mar 24, 2003
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                                Max's comments (and I know I"m behind in thanking people):

                                If you want to get someone started on history, I highly recommend Larry
                                Gonick's "Cartoon History of the Universe" series, currently collected in
                                three big volumes. He does a very good job of making history interesting
                                and funny at the same time; he also keeps a spotlight on the cause and
                                effect that is the important flow of history-- something that the usual
                                dreary grade-school parade of names, dates, and events leaves out. >>

                                Sounds good. I have to keep all these suggestions in a separate folder I
                                think.

                                << The thing that got me started in studying history and classics was
                                role-playing games. One of them, "Ars Magica", is set in the
                                Middle Ages as people thought they were at the time-- Aristotelian physics
                                included. Not enough monsters written up for the game? Just hit Pliny the
                                Elder's _Natural History_ for numerous bizarre ideas. (Historical
                                bestiaries are invariably weirder than the
                                things people make up for modern games.) Need adventure ideas? Check the
                                timeline. Just what *are* the characters going to do when the Mongol
                                hordes or the Crusades are passing through their area? >>

                                LOL I adore my DM (you know who you are). I have been playing RPGs (mostly
                                AD&D) since about 1979. And it is so true that a hobby can drag you back
                                to a school-era subject you really thought you had finally escaped.
                                Chemistry was my meaningless bugaboo and now an interest in beads and
                                semiprecious gemstones is dragging me back to try and better understand
                                both chemistry and earth science (stunk at that too).

                                << Our long-standing Ars Magica game is over, but we've got a
                                secret-history-conspiracy-time-travel game going now, and you
                                have to understand the mundane history in order to understand what the
                                fantastic history's about. Our world's history
                                really does hang on some interesting turning points. >>

                                Doesn't it though. And tweaking it to run RPGs is incredibly satisfying.
                                Or can be.

                                << Speaking of Aristotelian physics, I heartily recommend Richard
                                Garfinkel's _Celestial Matters_, which is a hard science fiction
                                novel where the science is Aristotelian. >>

                                Oh, ow. So those of us with an unsteady grasp on where science stands
                                today could read it and really get confused (thinking we are learning when
                                really we are becoming, er, what is the word? anachronisms?).

                                --

                                Lizzie Triano
                                lizziewriter@...
                                amor vincit omnia
                              • Max Rible
                                ... I really wouldn t worry about getting confused there. It s pretty obvious when it s mentioned that modern Greek spaceships are made of celestial matter
                                Message 15 of 17 , Mar 24, 2003
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                                  On Mon, 2003-03-24 at 12:41, Elizabeth Apgar Triano wrote:
                                  > << Speaking of Aristotelian physics, I heartily recommend Richard
                                  > Garfinkel's _Celestial Matters_, which is a hard science fiction
                                  > novel where the science is Aristotelian. >>
                                  >
                                  > Oh, ow. So those of us with an unsteady grasp on where science stands
                                  > today could read it and really get confused (thinking we are learning when
                                  > really we are becoming, er, what is the word? anachronisms?).

                                  I really wouldn't worry about getting confused there. It's pretty
                                  obvious when it's mentioned that "modern" Greek spaceships are made of
                                  celestial matter harvested from the Moon (thus causing them to
                                  move in a circular rather than centripetal motion) and supplied
                                  by spontaneous generation (carried out carefully in clean rooms
                                  lest the balance of ingredients be less than precise and you just
                                  get a huge load of flies instead of a cow) that this is *not*
                                  your standard physics.
                                  --
                                  %% Max Rible % slothman@... % www.amurgsval.org/~slothman/ %%
                                  %% "Before enlightenment: sharpen claws, catch mice. %%
                                  %% After enlightenment: sharpen claws, catch mice." %%
                                • Paul F. Labaki
                                  Wendell and all, I apologize. I cut most of the post I was replying to, yet the full original post somehow survived to show up on list. I ll try to figure it
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Mar 24, 2003
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                                    Wendell and all, I apologize. I cut most of the post I was replying to, yet
                                    the full original post somehow survived to show up on list. I'll try to
                                    figure it out.

                                    Peace,
                                    Paul Labaki

                                    From: WendellWag@...
                                    Reply-To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                                    Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 19:48:24 EST
                                    To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Lost transcendent values


                                    Paul, I hate to sound picky, but I'm utterly lost as to what in your post is
                                    a quote from Lizzie and what is your reply to her. I've noticed this with
                                    several people now. Please, when you quote someone, pick some consistent
                                    way
                                    of indicating what is your own writing and what is quoted from the person
                                    you're replying to. I know that you know what's what and perhaps the person
                                    you're replying to knows what's what, but frequently people who aren't
                                    careful about this confuse everybody else.

                                    Wendell Wagner

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                                  • Paul F. Labaki
                                    It is an ancient practice too. For example, the Maronite Rite also has only one scripture reading before the gospel. The service is many centuries old, not
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Mar 24, 2003
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                                      It is an ancient practice too. For example, the Maronite Rite also has only
                                      one scripture reading before the gospel. The service is many centuries old,
                                      not in the least modern. There is a lot of room for flexibility in
                                      practice. That being said, I prefer more words too.

                                      Peace,
                                      Paul Labaki

                                      From: SusanPal@...
                                      Reply-To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                                      Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 21:38:03 EST
                                      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Re: Rowling - an Inkling??, and faith/literature
                                      ingeneral


                                      our "contemporary" liturgy only includes two
                                      Scripture readings -- Gospel and one other -- which bothers me.

                                      Adding MORE words doesn't tend to ruffle my feathers, but removing words
                                      does!

                                      Susan


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