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Re: Elsie Dinsmore ? & others

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  • ERATRIANO@xxx.xxx
    Hi Diane, Actually I like Lovecraft, find him enjoyable kitschy and I live in NYS so I get a charge out of the New England inbred scene things. Modern dark
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 5, 1999
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      Hi Diane,

      Actually I like Lovecraft, find him enjoyable kitschy and I live in NYS so I
      get a charge out of the New England inbred scene things. Modern dark stuff,
      though, it's a little too haunting. Uh, the fellow who wrote "Silence of the
      Lambs," ... I read his "Red Dragon." Very Scary! Does that help?

      I can take tons of kidding, just don't like to be condescended to ... don't
      think anyone does. The English girls' school thing, sounds worth looking
      for, sniff sniff sniff...

      Lizzie
    • Paul F. Labaki
      I ve been awqy from my machine for awhile, so I appologize for sounding off on this a little bit late. I would like to strongly second Mary s recommendation
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 21, 1999
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        I've been awqy from my machine for awhile, so I appologize for sounding off
        on this a little bit late. I would like to strongly second Mary's
        recommendation of Pullman's trilogy. I am unfamiliar with his other work,
        but in THE GOLDEN COMPASS and THE SUBTLE KNIFE his characters are real and
        well rounded, the world of his story is utterly believable from the first,
        and the result is a series of books that is moving, deep down inside,
        emotionally, as few are. The magical elements he integrates, while profound
        and pervasive, while retaining a subtlety that prevents them from dominating
        the story or overshadowing character or action. Pullman, here, is
        inventive, original and engaging, and is most of all, fun.

        A merry and blessed Christmas to all.

        Peace,

        Paul Labaki

        ----------
        >From: Stolzi@...
        >To: mythsoc@onelist.com
        >Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Elsie Dinsmore ? & others
        >Date: Sat, Dec 4, 1999, 10:36 PM
        >

        > From: Stolzi@...
        >
        > Lizzie, visit http://members.aol.com/dwalheim/merelewis.html
        > to read archives or to go ahead and sign up for MereLewis.
        >
        > You might like to try the now-famous and controversial HARRY POTTER -- see
        > what =you= think. Or for something deeper, and darker, but extraordinarily
        > well-written, the new trilogy by Philip Pullman. Vol. 1, THE GOLDEN COMPASS,
        > I liked better than Vol. 2, THE SUBTLE KNIFE. The third volume won't be out
        > until next spring.
        >
        > Mary S
        >
        > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      • ERATRIANO@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 12/21/1999 2:04:45 PM Eastern Standard Time, sheik@buffnet.net writes:
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 21, 1999
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          In a message dated 12/21/1999 2:04:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
          sheik@... writes:

          << I would like to strongly second Mary's
          recommendation of Pullman's trilogy. I am unfamiliar with his other work,
          but in THE GOLDEN COMPASS and THE SUBTLE KNIFE his characters are real and
          well rounded, the world of his story is utterly believable from the first,
          and the result is a series of books that is moving, deep down inside,
          emotionally, as few are. >>
          Oh it stinks being so long out of college and out of the reading loop... can
          I search for these books at amazon.com because I suspect that is the ONLY way
          I will ever find them... much as i love browsing the used and new bookstores.

          ANyone live in te NY/Mass area? I am thinking of Rodgers Book Barn in
          Craryville/Hillsdale NY.

          Lizzie
        • David Lenander
          These books are easily available in paperback editions or via your public library. _The Golden Compass_ received the Carnegie Medal in Britain ( often
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 21, 1999
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            These books are easily available in paperback editions or via your public
            library.

            _The Golden Compass_ received the Carnegie Medal in Britain ( often described as
            the British equivalent of the U.S. Newbery Medal), under its original title of
            _Northern Lights_ (I think it was). I don't think they're as fine as some
            others do, particularly the second volume, but they're far-better written than
            the _Harry Potter_ books, and until the sensational success of the latter, I
            would have thought that Pullman's books were just about the most successful
            children's fantasies of the past few years in terms of their sales. For me, the
            Kara Dalkey duo of _Little Sister_ and _The Heavenward Path_ are books that I
            would recommend, but these may be harder to find. I just finished our past
            MFA-winner (for _Owl In Love_) Patrice Kindl's _The Woman in the Wall_, and it's
            almost as good as _Owl_, and quite different in many ways.

            ERATRIANO@... wrote:

            > From: ERATRIANO@...
            >
            > In a message dated 12/21/1999 2:04:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            > sheik@... writes:
            >
            > << I would like to strongly second Mary's
            > recommendation of Pullman's trilogy. I am unfamiliar with his other work,
            > but in THE GOLDEN COMPASS and THE SUBTLE KNIFE his characters are real and
            > well rounded, the world of his story is utterly believable from the first,
            > and the result is a series of books that is moving, deep down inside,
            > emotionally, as few are. >>
            > Oh it stinks being so long out of college and out of the reading loop... can
            > I search for these books at amazon.com because I suspect that is the ONLY way
            > I will ever find them... much as i love browsing the used and new bookstores.
            >
            > ANyone live in te NY/Mass area? I am thinking of Rodgers Book Barn in
            > Craryville/Hillsdale NY.
            >
            > Lizzie
            >
            > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          • Wayne G. Hammond
            ... described as ... title of ... than ... Not that Harry needs me to defend him, but I d say that Pullman s books aren t better written than Rowling s,
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 22, 1999
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              David Lenander wrote:

              >_The Golden Compass_ received the Carnegie Medal in Britain ( often
              described as
              >the British equivalent of the U.S. Newbery Medal), under its original
              title of
              >_Northern Lights_ (I think it was). I don't think they're as fine as some
              >others do, particularly the second volume, but they're far-better written
              than
              >the _Harry Potter_ books

              Not that Harry needs me to defend him, but I'd say that Pullman's books
              aren't better written than Rowling's, they're just written very
              differently, for very different audiences -- in the first instance, for
              Pullman and Rowling themselves, who are poles apart. The Harry Potter books
              are well written for what they are, clever, witty, entertaining, with very
              sympathetic characters; if they weren't, they wouldn't be flying off the
              shelves so quickly, nor would their readers be so remarkably enthusiastic
              about them.

              But I agree that _The Golden Compass_ is better than _The Subtle Knife_.
              Both books should be much better known; the other day, I recommended them
              to a part-time elementary school teacher who hadn't heard of them. _The
              Golden Compass_ is compelling, and haunts the memory. _The Subtle Knife_
              doesn't hold together quite as well, though it too has its moments, and I
              may think better of it as a whole on a second reading. It's been so long,
              I'll need to re-read both books before the third, _The Amber Spyglass_, is
              published in May.

              Wayne Hammond
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