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Sayers

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  • jchristopher@tarleton.edu
    I have just received my copy of Dorothy L. Sayers _Child and Woman of Her Time_ Vol. 5 A supplement to _The Letters of Dorothy L. Sayers_ Ed. Barbara Reynolds
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 24, 2003
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      I have just received my copy of

      Dorothy L. Sayers
      _Child and Woman of Her Time_
      Vol. 5
      A supplement to _The Letters of Dorothy L. Sayers_
      Ed. Barbara Reynolds
      with a preface by Christopher Dean
      Cambridge: The Dorothy L. Sayers Society, 2002

      It contains "My Edwardian Childhood" (Sayers' start of an autobiography)
      and "Cat O'Mary: The Biography of a Prig" (Sayers' start of a fictional
      version of the same material, which was to be published under the pseudonym
      of Johanna Leigh).

      --Joe
    • jchristopher@tarleton.edu
      Sorry, the ice here kept me from the office yesterday, so I didn t reply about the second Sayers-Walsh collaboration. David is right about the details of the
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 27, 2003
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        Sorry, the ice here kept me from the office yesterday, so I didn't reply
        about the second Sayers-Walsh collaboration. David is right about the
        details of the war years being based on the short series of fictional
        letters Sayers published during WWII. (They broke off with a note that
        they might be continued later, but they never were.) The review in
        Amazon.com is correct that Lord Peter is absent on war work during most of
        the book and that Harriet, living in the country with her family, does most
        of the detective work. I don't know of anything by Sayers that could be
        used for the basis of any future work, unless Walsh goes to the fragments
        of undeveloped short stories or the fragment of the one Lord Peter play.
        (So far as I know, Sayers' treatment for the Lord Peter movie that was made
        early on has not survived.) But, anyway, nothing that specifically ties to
        the later Wimsey's time period. (Of course, there's Lord Peter's late
        reminiscence of his one meeting with Sherlock Holmes that the Mythopoeic
        Press published--but it hardly seems enough to support a novel....)

        --Joe
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