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Tolkien and Angels

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  • wpierce@xxxx.xxx
    On 10/19 Scott wrote Tolkien was a Christian. Christians do believe in angels. The difference is, Tolkien got his beliefs from the Bible,. . . I wanted to
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 23, 1999
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      On 10/19 Scott wrote "Tolkien was a Christian.
      Christians do believe in angels. The difference
      is, Tolkien got his beliefs from the Bible,. . ."
      I wanted to add that Tolkien was also quite well
      versed in Northern mythology including norse.
      I found (I believe it was in Humphrey Carpenter's
      JRRT Bio.) that the names of Gandalf and Thorin and
      Co. were originally names of Dwarves (Dwarfs?) in
      Norse myth. Also interestingly enough, Elves
      in Norse myth were (according to my trusty BULLFINCH'S
      MYTHOLOGY) lesser dieties than gods.
      Bill Pierce
    • WendellWag@xxx.xxx
      In a message dated 10/24/99 1:26:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Yes. Incidentally, this was known well before Carpenter s biography. (I realize that 1977
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 24, 1999
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        In a message dated 10/24/99 1:26:47 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        wpierce@... writes:

        > I found (I believe it was in Humphrey Carpenter's JRRT Bio.) that the
        > names of Gandalf and Thorin and Co. were originally names of
        > Dwarves (Dwarfs?) in Norse myth.

        Yes. Incidentally, this was known well before Carpenter's biography. (I
        realize that 1977 seems like the Jurassic Era to some of you, but there's a
        lot of Tolkien scholarship from before that year.)

        You bring up the interesting subject of what we should use for the plural of
        "dwarf". Before the publication of Tolkien's books, there was no question.
        "Dwarfs" was the standard plural, and "dwarves" was an obsolete form. The
        OED still does not list anything other than "dwarfs". The American Heritage
        Dictionary list "dwarves" as an alternate form. Tolkien used 'dwarves"
        because he thought it sounded better. "Dwarves" has returned to occasional
        use purely because of Tolkien's choice. (He also used "dwarvish" instead of
        "dwarfish", "elvish" instead of "elfish", and "elven" instead of "elfin")

        I have a suggestion. I think we should use "dwarves", "dwarvish", "elvish",
        and "elven" for literary and mythological uses and "dwarfs", "dwarfish",
        "elfish", and "elfin" for human beings and metaphorical uses (like a "white
        dwarf" in astronomy).
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