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Shore

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  • spark654@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/6/03 8:39:28 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... I think it s too bad that we have to slam every single element because we dislike certain
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 6, 2003
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      In a message dated 1/6/03 8:39:28 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      mythsoc@yahoogroups.com writes:


      > Shore's Nazgul music starts loud with simpler rhythms,
      > building tension mostly through sequencing (jacking each repetition a tone
      > further up the scale), the last resort of unimaginative composers

      I think it's too bad that we have to slam every single element because we
      dislike certain liberties--it reminds me of political partisans who don't
      just attack the opponent's stands on issues, but their personal life, accent,
      etc.

      The use of "sequencing" and repetition in a film score is about building on
      established patterns, and is as acceptable a tool as cutting back and forth
      to the same point-of-view shot in a scene to keep a character's position
      relative to another's.

      Shore's score has echoes of Orff, but it's also in the tradition of Bernard
      Herrmann (who influenced Phillip Glass, unfortunately) as well as Shore's
      individual style. John Williams' stlye would be unbearably hectic in a
      movie-serial way; Shore's approach lays down a certain pace for each scene,
      which cuts through the individual character and camera moves.

      You don't have to LIKE these elements, but just because you don't doesn't
      make the composer unimaginative. Especially in context of current movie
      music adventure scoring standards, it's a very shrewd choice, giving the film
      more the feel of a drama rather than an action film.
      Sparkdog


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