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Leiber

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  • spark654@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/1/03 4:14:26 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Michael Moorcock, I think, quotes Fritz Leiber about the books. They both agree that after the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 1, 2003
      In a message dated 1/1/03 4:14:26 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      mythsoc@yahoogroups.com writes:


      > I'm intrigued that the film mirrors the story in that it seems to be getting
      > better
      > as it goes along. It has always seemed odd to me, though not in a bad way,
      > that
      > both /The Hobbit/ and LotR change in style over the course of the story.
      > They get
      > nobler and more mature as they go along

      Michael Moorcock, I think, quotes Fritz Leiber about the books. They both
      agree that after the first book, there isn't much to remember. Yet fans of
      the book share your view. The critics seem to have special disdain for The
      Two Towers.

      Sparkdog


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David J Finnamore
      Leiber?! Lieber Himmel! ... Not much to remember. Not remember Treebeard, and his heart-rending song of the Ent-wives? Not remember beautiful Henneth Annun?
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 4, 2003
        Leiber?! Lieber Himmel!

        Sparkdog wrote:

        > Michael Moorcock, I think, quotes Fritz Leiber about the books. They both
        > agree that after the first book, there isn't much to remember. Yet fans of
        > the book share your view. The critics seem to have special disdain for The
        > Two Towers.

        Not much to remember. Not remember Treebeard, and his heart-rending song of the Ent-wives? Not remember beautiful Henneth Annun? Not remember the witch-king leading his army from Minas Morgul? Shelob? The tower of Cirith Ungol? Sam
        glimpsing a star in the sky over Mordor? The destruction of the One Ring? The Path of the Dead? The siege of Minas Tirith? The pyre of Denethor? Eowyn and Merry teaming up to defeat the witch-king? The love story of Faramir and Eowyn?
        The scouring of the Shire?

        Moorcock and Leiber should have themselves screened for Alzheimer's before it's too late.

        --
        David J. Finnamore
        Nashville, TN, USA
        http://www.elvenminstrel.com
        --
        "We never remember what is important, only what matters to us." - Suzanne Finnamore, /Otherwise Engaged/
      • Mark E. Hall
        ... Well, in the case of Fritz Leiber, he has been dead well over 5 years now---probably a decade or so... Best, MEH
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 4, 2003
          > Moorcock and Leiber should have themselves screened for
          > Alzheimer's before it's too late.
          >
          > --
          > David J. Finnamore
          > Nashville, TN, USA
          > http://www.elvenminstrel.com

          Well, in the case of Fritz Leiber, he has been dead well over 5 years
          now---probably a decade or so...
          Best, MEH
        • David S Bratman
          Here s what Leiber actually wrote. He wrote this in 1969: There s no arguing that a vast number of people - intelligent, educated, and sensitive people, I
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 4, 2003
            Here's what Leiber actually wrote. He wrote this in 1969:

            "There's no arguing that a vast number of people - intelligent, educated,
            and sensitive people, I mean - young and old (but especially the former) -
            are tremendously and enduringly enthusiastic about Tolkien's trilogy, yet I
            do meet quite a few whose reactions are much like my own. We almost always
            start with, 'The ents are great! Oh boy, yes. And that first part of the
            quest with the black riders in the distance and Strider a mystery -- that's
            great too. Oh and yes, the first appearances of the Nazgul and the Balrog
            ...' At about which point the silence begins and we search our memories
            and look at each other rather guiltily -- exciting things _should_ spring
            to mind, but they don't."

            I do not rank this among the great dumb things said about Tolkien, because
            Leiber is reporting his own opinion and those of some people he's talked
            to. He is not claiming that the reaction is universal (e.g. Rushdie's
            "Nobody ever read Tolkien for the language") or that he's discovered some
            great truth about LOTR.

            All I can say is that, while I've certainly met many people who've read
            LOTR but were not particularly enthusiastic about it, none have ever said
            to me that the book's problem for them was a lack of memorable
            scenes. Either they weren't really fantasy fans at all (not Leiber's
            problem), or they found the book too slow or stiffly-worded.

            Source: Leiber is quoted by Lin Carter in his book _Imaginary Worlds_
            (Ballantine, 1973, p. 116), same source as the Carter quotes I provided
            last week.

            - David Bratman
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