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Fall issue of Phantastes

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  • d.bratman@xxxxx.xxx
    Is the feeling one gets on reading the phrase fantasy masters such as Tolkien, Eddings, and Le Guin better described as whiplash or vertigo? David Bratman -
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 22, 1999
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      Is the feeling one gets on reading the phrase "fantasy masters such as
      Tolkien, Eddings, and Le Guin" better described as whiplash or vertigo?

      David Bratman
      - not responsible for the following advertisement -
    • Staci Dumoski
      ... Do you have a point, or are you just being catty? Staci Ann Dumoski Phantastes Editor and Publisher The Fantasy Writer s Guide
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 23, 1999
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        On Thu, 23 Sep 1999 d.bratman@... wrote:

        > Is the feeling one gets on reading the phrase "fantasy masters such as
        > Tolkien, Eddings, and Le Guin" better described as whiplash or vertigo?

        Do you have a point, or are you just being catty?

        Staci Ann Dumoski Phantastes
        Editor and Publisher "The Fantasy Writer's Guide"
        editor@... http://www.phantastes.com/

        Fall 1999 Issue Now Online!
      • Berni Phillips
        ... What exactly is the effect his work has had on the fantasy genre as a whole ? I m serious, not being snarky. I can understand saying he s important
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 23, 1999
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          > From: Staci Dumoski <unicorn@...>

          > Admittedly, Eddings is not one of my favorite writers, but you can't
          > deny the effect his work has had on the fantasy genre as a whole. He may
          > not be a literary master, but he has certainly "mastered" his particular
          > niche, and there are probably more young readers pouring through his works
          > right now than reading Tolkien. I can't count the times I've read or
          > heard people saying they didn't like Tolkien, but preferred the likes of
          > Eddings and Jordan.

          What exactly is "the effect his work has had on the fantasy genre as a
          whole"? I'm serious, not being snarky. I can understand saying he's
          important because he's attracting younger readers, but I don't see how
          he has had any effect at all on the genre, at least not positively. I
          think he's had a very negative effect in his multibook series. I read
          the first series, upon my sister's urgings. I found them very generic,
          and when it was over, I just wanted to say, "Thank God, it's over!" I
          was appalled to find he was writing more. (And this was even before I
          met David, I believe.)

          Berni, who is also not responsible for the following ad:
        • Paul F. Labaki
          My two cents: le Guin is an author with a great deal to offer her readers, but she is not the master wordsmith that Tolkien is (I say having read only 4 or 5
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 23, 1999
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            My two cents:

            le Guin is an author with a great deal to offer her readers, but she is not
            the master wordsmith that Tolkien is (I say having read only 4 or 5 of her
            books and one short story).

            As for Eddings, fun yeah, but not much more than a large sweetmeat. He
            acknowledges Tolkiens mastery, but in the interviews I've read he humbly has
            declined to acknowledge himself JRRT's equal. How can anyone do other than
            concur?

            Paul Labaki

            ----------
            >From: Staci Dumoski <unicorn@...>
            >To: mythsoc@onelist.com
            >Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Fall issue of Phantastes
            >Date: Thu, Sep 23, 1999, 11:37 AM
            >

            > From: Staci Dumoski <unicorn@...>
            >
            >
            > On Thu, 23 Sep 1999 d.bratman@... wrote:
            >
            >> Is the feeling one gets on reading the phrase "fantasy masters such as
            >> Tolkien, Eddings, and Le Guin" better described as whiplash or vertigo?
            >
            > Do you have a point, or are you just being catty?
            >
            > Staci Ann Dumoski Phantastes
            > Editor and Publisher "The Fantasy Writer's Guide"
            > editor@... http://www.phantastes.com/
            >
            > Fall 1999 Issue Now Online!
            >
            >
            >
            > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          • Staci Dumoski
            ... Admittedly, Eddings is not one of my favorite writers, but you can t deny the effect his work has had on the fantasy genre as a whole. He may not be a
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 23, 1999
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              On Thu, 23 Sep 1999, Paul F. Labaki wrote:

              > le Guin is an author with a great deal to offer her readers, but she is not
              > the master wordsmith that Tolkien is (I say having read only 4 or 5 of her
              > books and one short story).
              >
              > As for Eddings, fun yeah, but not much more than a large sweetmeat. He
              > acknowledges Tolkiens mastery, but in the interviews I've read he humbly has
              > declined to acknowledge himself JRRT's equal. How can anyone do other than
              > concur?

              Admittedly, Eddings is not one of my favorite writers, but you can't
              deny the effect his work has had on the fantasy genre as a whole. He may
              not be a literary master, but he has certainly "mastered" his particular
              niche, and there are probably more young readers pouring through his works
              right now than reading Tolkien. I can't count the times I've read or
              heard people saying they didn't like Tolkien, but preferred the likes of
              Eddings and Jordan. It's very much a matter of taste (and maybe
              maturity?), and face it, anyone on -this- list is going to strongly biased
              towards Tolkien. As for Le Guin, her mastery lies in areas of concept and
              storytelling, not as a wordsmith as you point out. But there are many
              kinds of mastery, wouldn't you say?

              I think it should be kept in mind that original statement ("masters of
              fantasy such as Tolkien, Eddings, and Le Guin") was 1) a marketing
              statement being sent to a variety of audiences and trying to draw as many
              people to Phantastes as possible, and 2) referring to a specific article
              in the journal dealing with those three authors.

              I took offense at David Bratman's statement ("Is the feeling one gets on
              reading the phrase...better described as whiplash or vertigo?") because
              not only does it display an elitist attitude, but it also showed very
              little consideration for another member of this list in the way it was so
              callously worded. I have no problem with people expressing differing
              opinions, but I think it could be done with a little more respect.

              Regards,
              Staci Ann Dumoski Phantastes
              Editor and Publisher "The Fantasy Writer's Guide"
              editor@... http://www.phantastes.com/
            • Cat Eldridge
              ... I agree. And I believe that Le Guin is the equal of Tolkien. Her fiction, esp. The Earthsea Trilogy, is every bit as interesting as the Lord of the Rings.
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 23, 1999
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                >I took offense at David Bratman's statement ("Is the feeling one gets on
                >reading the phrase...better described as whiplash or vertigo?") because
                >not only does it display an elitist attitude, but it also showed very
                >little consideration for another member of this list in the way it was so
                >callously worded. I have no problem with people expressing differing
                >opinions, but I think it could be done with a little more respect.

                I agree. And I believe that Le Guin is the equal of Tolkien. Her fiction,
                esp. The Earthsea Trilogy, is every bit as interesting as the Lord of the
                Rings. Or check out her brillant "ethnography" Always Coming Home. LeGuin
                certainly has had a more varied writing that Tolkien had, and her writing
                certainly is well-known and respected.

                Cat Eldridge, Editor and Publisher of Folk Tales <http://www.folk-tales.com>
              • Edith Louise Crowe
                ... I believe the correct term in this instance is cognitive dissonance. That s what it gives me! Edith
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 23, 1999
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                  On Thu, 23 Sep 1999 d.bratman@... wrote:

                  > From: d.bratman@...
                  >
                  > Is the feeling one gets on reading the phrase "fantasy masters such as
                  > Tolkien, Eddings, and Le Guin" better described as whiplash or vertigo?

                  I believe the correct term in this instance is "cognitive dissonance."
                  That's what it gives me!

                  Edith
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