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Re: [mythsoc] Digest Number 1086

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  • Steve Schaper
    I just went to see The Two Towers. At least that is what it said it was on my ticket. I m not sure what movie that actually was, though. The screenwriters are
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 30, 2002
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      I just went to see The Two Towers.

      At least that is what it said it was on my ticket.

      I'm not sure what movie that actually was, though.


      The screenwriters are now under the Ban of the Valar.
    • Bill
      Strange. I just saw The Two Towers today, and enjoyed it. I plan to go see it again on my next day off from work. One of my nephews has already seen it three
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 30, 2002
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        Strange.
        I just saw The Two Towers today, and enjoyed it. I plan to go
        see
        it again on my next day off from work. One of my nephews has
        already
        seen it three times. When I discussed it with him today, he
        commented
        that he couldn't understand why some people can't seperate the
        film from
        the books, because after all, it's two different mediums, and
        the screenplay was
        an adaptation of the book, not the book itself.
        Ah well, different strokes for different folks....



        Steve Schaper wrote:

        > I just went to see The Two Towers.
        >
        > At least that is what it said it was on my ticket.
        >
        > I'm not sure what movie that actually was, though.
        >
        >
        > The screenwriters are now under the Ban of the Valar.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Carl F. Hostetter
        Clearly, Steve Schaper had _no_ trouble separating the film from the books (despite your implication) -- so little trouble, in fact, that they appear to him
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 31, 2002
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          Clearly, Steve Schaper had _no_ trouble "separating the film from the
          books" (despite your implication) -- so little trouble, in fact, that
          they appear to him to be entirely unrelated things! -- so I don't see
          why you should consider his reaction "strange".

          When one goes to see a film adaptation of a famous novel, one
          _naturally_ expects that the film will stay true to at least the most
          fundamental themes and characterizations of the novel. Only a child or
          an idiot would fail to recognize that books and film are different
          media; but that fact has _absolutely no bearing_ on the expectation of
          fidelity to core themes and characterizations (unless you are prepared
          to argue that there are some themes and characterizations that films
          are inherently incapable of exploring and expressing, which is absurd
          on its face). And it is on _this_ count, this lack of _fundamental_
          fidelity to theme and character, that Jackson's films fail _as
          adaptations of Tolkien's novel_.

          And for this viewer, they fail even as films, because the changes that
          were made to the fundamental themes and characterizations (e.g., the
          systematic removal of all traces of nobility and faith from the most
          noble and faithful characters, and the concomitant angstifying
          (Aragorn) and wimpifying (Frodo)) are so unartful and cliche-ridden as
          to be downright boring where not embarrassing.


          On Tuesday, December 31, 2002, at 12:57 AM, Bill wrote:

          > Strange.
          > I just saw The Two Towers today, and enjoyed it. I plan to go
          > see it again on my next day off from work. One of my nephews has
          > already seen it three times. When I discussed it with him today, he
          > commented that he couldn't understand why some people can't seperate
          > the film from the books, because after all, it's two different
          > mediums, and the screenplay was an adaptation of the book, not the
          > book itself. Ah well, different strokes for different folks....
          >
          > Steve Schaper wrote:
          >
          >> I just went to see The Two Towers.
          >> At least that is what it said it was on my ticket.
          >> I'm not sure what movie that actually was, though.
          >> The screenwriters are now under the Ban of the Valar.
        • David S Bratman
          ... Bill, your nephew s comment has already been responded to several times before you ever passed it along, most recently and clearly by JP Massar, ... -
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 31, 2002
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            At 12:57 AM 12/31/2002 -0500, Bill wrote:
            > One of my nephews has already
            > seen it three times. When I discussed it with him today, he
            > commented
            > that he couldn't understand why some people can't seperate the
            > film from
            > the books, because after all, it's two different mediums, and
            > the screenplay was
            > an adaptation of the book, not the book itself.

            Bill, your nephew's comment has already been responded to several times
            before you ever passed it along, most recently and clearly by JP Massar,
            who wrote:

            >it seems that with a really minor amount of adjustment the film could have
            >stayed MUCH truer to Tolkien without in any way having harmed the constraints
            >I listed above: film run-time, changing the medium, or appealing to a mass
            >audience.


            - David Bratman
          • Bill
            First off..let s get something clear here. Strange was not meant in a derogatory manner. It was a comment on how two people..any two people..could see a movie,
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 31, 2002
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              First off..let's get something clear here.
              Strange was not meant in a derogatory manner. It was a comment
              on
              how two people..any two people..could see a movie, or read a
              book, or
              see or hear any work of art and come away with two differing
              viewpoints.
              And with that, I retire back into the shadows from which I
              came.

              Happy New Year to all.



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Carl F. Hostetter
              ... Whoever said it was? What a strange thing to say...
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 1, 2003
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                On Wednesday, January 1, 2003, at 12:34 AM, Bill wrote:

                > First off..let's get something clear here. Strange was not meant in a
                > derogatory manner.

                Whoever said it was? What a strange thing to say...
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