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Re: [mythsoc] Film Scores

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  • jamcconney@aol.com
    In a message dated 12/18/2002 8:11:29 AM Central Standard Time, ... What I stated--or meant to state (perhaps lamely)--was somewhat more that that. In a live
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 18, 2002
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      In a message dated 12/18/2002 8:11:29 AM Central Standard Time,
      spark654@... writes:

      > a holdover from silent films, where the music was there to
      > add to the drama or comedy, and opera, as you state.
      >

      What I stated--or meant to state (perhaps lamely)--was somewhat more that
      that. In a live production, there is a strong empathic interaction between
      the actors and the audience, reinforced by the crowd mentality that kicks in.
      This is extremely powerful and is felt by the actors, who in turn respond to
      it, creating an increasingly powerful back and forth reaction.

      This mutual rapport between actors and audience is, of course, lacking in
      film, where the emotional response is entirely one way. It's even more
      lacking in TV where (for the most part) the audience is a small group and
      does not generate the crowd reaction. Yes, musical accompaniment began in
      silent films--but I suggest that it was carried on to the present day because
      of the need to supplement the emotional responses that occur naturally in
      stage productions.

      Just 2 final points and then I'll bow out. (1) The movies were not the first
      dramas to use this technique. Leaving operas aside for now, Beethoven wrote
      incidental music for _Egmont_, including a scene combining music and the
      hero's final impassioned speech. And (2) what's wrong with being manipulated?
      That's what we pays our money and plunks down our ticket for. Haven't you
      ever said after a movie, "It didn't grab me"? Or put down a book and never
      picked it up again because you just couldn't get interested in either the
      characters or the story, didn't--in other words--care how it came out? In
      both cases the author/actor/director failed in the task of using all his/her
      art and technique to provide you with a satisfying experience--a form of
      manipulation that, far from being a bad thing, is exactly what you wanted
      that film or book to give you.

      Anne



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