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Post-colonialism and U of I, Chicago

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  • M. Briski
    Po-Co is presumably post-colonialist, the hot new thing in cultural studies. I presume the name was formed on the analogy of po-mo for
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 25, 2002
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      <quote> "Po-Co" is presumably post-colonialist, the
      hot new thing in cultural
      studies. I presume the name was formed on the analogy
      of "po-mo" for
      post-modernist, which was several hot new things ago.
      Given that this
      professor is Indian and India is the standard example
      in
      post-colonialism, at
      least that would fit with Meredith's post.

      Wendell Wagner <unquote>

      Pre-cisely, Wendell. Trudy, I was just apologizing for
      messing up your example. It gets exasperating after a
      while to have every generalization smashed. Still,
      we'll have the truth at all costs, as I know you
      agree, and your point does not fall for the loss of
      one example.

      <quote> I'm still becoming a prof, but I do teach at
      University of Illinois at Chicago. I do Anglo-Saxon
      lit and Anglo-Latin stuff primarily, but I'm teaching
      Middle English stuff too, and trying to find a way to
      work Tolkien into things, especially with the second
      movie coming out next month.

      Larry Swain <unquote>

      Ooo... close to Wheaton, indeed. And I've heard talk
      of U of I at Chicago in my search for graduate
      schools-- even little me here in tiny little Bowling
      Green S.U. (shall we just call it cow-patty U. and be
      done with it? I can count the number of decent profs
      on one hand, and they aren't all teaching.) The rumour
      has it, dear Larry, that your institution is rising
      rapidly, and while you aren't quite near the top yet
      you will be in a couple of years. How do you find
      teaching there?

      ~Meredith

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    • LARRY SWAIN
      ... I confess I haven t been to Wheaton yet. But probably will fairly soon, and I need to get my name on mailing lists so that I know when things are going on
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 27, 2002
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        --- "M. Briski" <aslan122@...> wrote:
        >
        > Ooo... close to Wheaton, indeed. And I've heard talk
        > of U of I at Chicago in my search for graduate
        > schools-- even little me here in tiny little Bowling
        > Green S.U. (shall we just call it cow-patty U. and
        > be
        > done with it? I can count the number of decent profs
        > on one hand, and they aren't all teaching.) The
        > rumour
        > has it, dear Larry, that your institution is rising
        > rapidly, and while you aren't quite near the top yet
        > you will be in a couple of years. How do you find
        > teaching there?

        I confess I haven't been to Wheaton yet. But probably
        will fairly soon, and I need to get my name on mailing
        lists so that I know when things are going on there
        Inkling related.

        UIC is an interesting place. Stanley Fish is here, of
        interest to those in the recent conversation, and
        other "theorists" come through. A number of key
        writers and thinkers come through the area, and often
        (though not always) come to UIC. The student body is
        very urban, and urban in the old fashioned sense.
        Here you will find not only inner city whites and
        blacks, but a large number of second language
        speakers--children of immigrants from Eastern Europe
        (Polish, Ukrainean, Lithuanian, etc), Indian, Iranian
        and Iraqui and other Arabic peoples, Latinos,
        Taiwanese, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Ethiopian, and
        more. It is a fascinating mix and challenging to hear
        two blonde students walking down the sidewalk speaking
        Ukrainean, a couple of Latinos in Spanish passing me
        on the other side, and someone speaking Russian to a
        group crowded around them in the quad. And I'm
        supposed to teach these guys English language and
        literature. It is a challenge to defend Anglo-Saxon
        and Middle English as fields of study in such an
        environment. So while UIC doesn't have a lot of
        resources for being an Anglo-Saxonist and
        "philologist" in either the old or new senses of the
        word, it is a very good and great place to be.

        Larry Swain
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