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Re: [mythsoc] Aragorn and kingship, and kingship elsewhere

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  • ERATRIANO@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/24/2002 4:00:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Yes, I thought I had noticed that, but I haven t really followed up on it yet. I ve read
    Message 1 of 29 , Nov 24, 2002
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      In a message dated 11/24/2002 4:00:55 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      Stolzi@... writes:

      > It's interesting to me to see that the cheap paperback romance, which I
      > think
      > of as one of the most notable forms of wish-fulfillment fantasy, now has a
      > sub-set of volumes in which there is still the everlasting girl-boy thing
      > but
      > a fantasy element is introduced as well.
      >

      Yes, I thought I had noticed that, but I haven't really followed up on it
      yet. I've read one or two Jude Devereux (sp) titles, and I also liked some
      Andrew M. Greeley, the ones about angels, especially the one about Gabrielle.


      Course then we are getting into religion as fantasy, and that is a whole
      'nother hornet's nest.

      Lizzie


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    • SusanPal@aol.com
      In a message dated 11/24/2002 4:58:08 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... Yep. I keep trying to work on an essay on the intersections between faith and fantasy, and
      Message 2 of 29 , Nov 24, 2002
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        In a message dated 11/24/2002 4:58:08 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        ERATRIANO@... writes:


        > Course then we are getting into religion as fantasy, and that is a whole
        > 'nother hornet's nest.
        >

        Yep. I keep trying to work on an essay on the intersections between faith
        and fantasy, and it keeps getting too complicated on me! My sense is that
        imagination and intution lie at the core of both, and that both are about
        certain kinds of investment in things not seen -- and both are about
        liminality, too, about negotiating boundaries between knowledge and belief.
        But it really *is* a hornet's next, and I haven't been able to work out
        anything very coherent yet!

        And perhaps Tolkien did it as well as anyone could in "On Fairy-stories."
        "God is the Lord, of angels, and of men -- and of elves." I nearly swooned
        when I read that.

        Susan


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      • ERATRIANO@aol.com
        In a message dated 11/23/2002 1:38:37 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... BTW I found this especially interesting, although all I know about fractals is that they
        Message 3 of 29 , Nov 25, 2002
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          In a message dated 11/23/2002 1:38:37 PM Eastern Standard Time,
          tgshaw@... writes:

          > Discover* magazine (not related to the Discovery Channel, BTW) had a
          > full-length article on a study of Jackson Pollock's artwork that showed the
          > degree of fractals appearing in it is very close to what's most appealing
          > to us in nature (measured, IIRC, by showing research subjects photos of
          > natural settings--tree branches and the like--displaying fractals in
          > varying degrees). "Splash art" made randomly didn't have this quality. So
          > there may be an actual reason that some people would pay good money for a
          > Pollock, but look at my display of drips and shake their heads. I'm afraid
          > the whole process of determining the degree of fractals in something was a
          > bit beyond me--while I'm fascinated by fractals (I've been known to take a
          > great deal of time turning a head of cauliflower into crudités because I
          > spend so much time just looking at the pieces and patterns), I've never
          > understood them mathematically.

          BTW I found this especially interesting, although all I know about fractals
          is that they are some sort of math related to pretty patterns, and that they
          can be studied. lol. I bet Asimov has done some nice readable essays on
          them though. I don't really have anything to add but I wanted to thank Trudy
          for her post, it's given me food for thought. More cauliflower anytime,
          Trudy! Hey, I bet fractal study could be applied to beadwork as well.

          Lizzie


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        • WendellWag@aol.com
          In a message dated 11/25/2002 7:47:36 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... I m pretty sure he hasn t. Asimov was (as he admitted himself) pretty weak in math for
          Message 4 of 29 , Nov 25, 2002
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            In a message dated 11/25/2002 7:47:36 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            ERATRIANO@... writes:


            > I bet Asimov has done some nice readable essays on
            > them though.

            I'm pretty sure he hasn't. Asimov was (as he admitted himself) pretty weak
            in math for somebody with a Ph.D. in chemistry. He said in his autobiography
            (or maybe it was in one of his essays) that he wouldn't even pretend to
            knowledge of any math beyond first-year calculus. Besides, fractals only
            became well known fairly late in Asimov's life.

            Wendell Wagner


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          • ERATRIANO@aol.com
            In a message dated 11/25/2002 9:27:21 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Oh, right, he s dead, isn t he? :-( My mistake. So whose should I read then? Barbara
            Message 5 of 29 , Nov 25, 2002
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              In a message dated 11/25/2002 9:27:21 PM Eastern Standard Time,
              WendellWag@... writes:

              > Besides, fractals only became well known fairly late in Asimov's life.
              >
              > Wendell Wagner

              Oh, right, he's dead, isn't he? :-( My mistake. So whose should I read
              then? Barbara Kingsolver? I'm not sure what she wrote about but I did just
              pick up a book of her essays (if that isn't an incriminating display of
              anti-logic then I'm Yu-Sai Wa Wa).

              Thank you, Wendell & sweet dreams to you tonight.

              Lizzie


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            • WendellWag@aol.com
              I don t know really. The only book I can think of offhand is _Chaos_ by James Gleick. Wendell Wagner
              Message 6 of 29 , Nov 25, 2002
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                I don't know really. The only book I can think of offhand is _Chaos_ by
                James Gleick.

                Wendell Wagner
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