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RE: Great Lit

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  • M. Briski
    Trudy said, I ve never heard of Conan Doyle s Sherlock Holmes stories being seriously studied as Great Literature (with the disclaimer that I m sure someone,
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 24, 2002
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      Trudy said,

      "I've never heard
      of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories being
      seriously studied as
      Great Literature (with the disclaimer that I'm sure
      someone, somewhere,
      has certainly done so), but they seem to have stood
      the test of time."

      Unfortunately for you, I have! Last Spring in the
      second half of my Brit Lit survey series we discussed
      "The Speckled Band." Isn't it odd how time marches on?
      I would never have imagined before coming to college
      that I would do anything of the sort. But my professor
      used it to look at how the British stereotyped their
      colonized countries (she's a Po-Co/Feminist critic, an
      Indian who did her undergraduate work in England.)

      ~Meredith

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    • tghsaw
      ... From: M. Briski To: Sent: Sunday, November 24, 2002 1:29 PM Subject: [mythsoc] RE: Great Lit ... I m not
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 24, 2002
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "M. Briski" <aslan122@...>
        To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, November 24, 2002 1:29 PM
        Subject: [mythsoc] RE: Great Lit


        > Trudy said,
        >
        > "I've never heard
        > of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories being
        > seriously studied as
        > Great Literature (with the disclaimer that I'm sure
        > someone, somewhere,
        > has certainly done so), but they seem to have stood
        > the test of time."
        >
        > Unfortunately for you, I have! Last Spring in the
        > second half of my Brit Lit survey series we discussed
        > "The Speckled Band." Isn't it odd how time marches on?
        > I would never have imagined before coming to college
        > that I would do anything of the sort. But my professor
        > used it to look at how the British stereotyped their
        > colonized countries (she's a Po-Co/Feminist critic, an
        > Indian who did her undergraduate work in England.)
        >
        > ~Meredith
        >

        I'm not sure why that's "unfortunate" for me--I'm glad to hear it's being
        used. I have absolutely no idea what a Po-Co/Feminist is, but I think I'm
        quite happy *not* knowing 8-) ...
        --Trudy
      • WendellWag@aol.com
        Po-Co is presumably post-colonialist, the hot new thing in cultural studies. I presume the name was formed on the analogy of po-mo for post-modernist,
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 24, 2002
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          "Po-Co" is presumably post-colonialist, the hot new thing in cultural
          studies. I presume the name was formed on the analogy of "po-mo" for
          post-modernist, which was several hot new things ago. Given that this
          professor is Indian and India is the standard example in post-colonialism, at
          least that would fit with Meredith's post.

          Wendell Wagner
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