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SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    closed yesterday at Nashville Children s Theatre. GAWAIN was excellently acted and surprisingly faithful to the poem. I liked the expressionistic stage, with
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 28, 2002
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      closed yesterday at Nashville Children's Theatre.


      GAWAIN was excellently acted and surprisingly faithful to the poem. I liked
      the expressionistic stage, with a sheet backdrop of the sky and a huge sun
      which could be chilly white, or terrifying green, or a cheerful red depending
      on lighting. But I never could see what was the use of the four long ropes at
      the corners of the stage platform - except to get in the way of the actors.

      One poor woman had to be Gringolet the horse and Guenevere the queen and a
      couple other things, w/o ever changing her hairstyle! (Little funny curls
      like a horse's dressed mane)

      The beheading was managed much as I expected, with a huge papier-mache head
      and a hooded cloak with raised shoulders - as soon as the head fell, the hood
      covered the "neck" from then until the Green Knight left the scene. However
      somebody slipped somehow, and the actress in front of the bowed Green Knight
      caught the head in her hands, or pulled it off, before Gawain's axe (and it
      was an awesome, glittering steel, axe on a six or eight foot shaft, very
      effective) had even reached the height of its swing. Oops.

      After that, when the head was returned to the Green Knight, he held it by
      the hair at arm's length, turning it suddenly towards the people he was
      supposedly looking at or talking to - skeery and effective.

      One thing I didn't like; probably because the story happens in the North of
      England, everyone was told to affect some sort of weird accent, which sounded
      more Irish to me than North of England. People called, for instance, upon
      "The Lard." I thought straight English, with a slight touch of "Oxford,"
      would have been better.

      Diamond Proudbrook


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