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Re: style

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  • jchristopher@tarleton.edu
    Back in my undergraduate days, I thought my being an English major would never cause me to not be able to read an author because of his/her style. But some
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 7, 2002
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      Back in my undergraduate days, I thought my being an English major would
      never cause me to not be able to read an author because of his/her style.
      But some years later, I gave all of my paperback copies of Erle Stanley
      Gardner's books to an aunt who liked mysteries. I had reached the point
      that his awkward dialogue was, so far as I was concerned, hopeless. (A
      friend of mine insists that the early Gardner novels are better written
      than the later ones; I will never go back to find out.) I must admit I do
      not go back to the early Ellery Queen novels nor to most of the John
      Dickson Carr novels these days, and I keep wondering what I would think now
      about Sax Rohmer's novels. (One of Williams' poems has a reference to Sax
      Rohmer.) I also don't go back to the copies of _Startling Stories_ and
      _Thrilling Wonder Stories_ that I read with avidity. Maybe I should, just
      to see what I think now. But there are lots of other things to read. I
      gave a paper on Sara Paretsky's _Ghost Country_ at a convention this last
      weekend, and I have been re-reading her V. I. Warshawski novels--those seem
      to me to be nicely written, with a goodly amount of interesting social
      comment. Is it just because she is currently popular?--I hope not; I hope
      it is because she writes well, and I've got background enough to appreciate
      it. Ah, matters of taste...

      --Joe
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