Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [mythsoc] Digest Number 1018

Expand Messages
  • jchristopher@tarleton.edu
    ... I liked (1) the way it began with the protagonist s conception rather than his birth (2) the way that one can never again treat 20th-century avant garde
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 7, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      >Message: 25
      > Date: Sat, 5 Oct 2002 00:47:11 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: "M. Briski" <aslan122@...>
      >Subject: Tristam Shandy
      >
      >So Susan and David don't like Tristam Shandy. Is there
      >anyone who does like it? Does it have any redeaming
      >qualities? I have to read it in the next two weeks and
      >be able to explain it to those who haven't read it in
      >a fifteen minute presentation. I've started it, but
      >haven't gotten past the first section because I'm much
      >more concerned with a couple of exams and a very
      >important paper. To me it seems witty on a deep level,
      >but kind of tedious, in a sense.
      >
      >~Merry

      I liked
      (1) the way it began with the protagonist's conception rather than his birth
      (2) the way that one can never again treat 20th-century avant garde fiction
      as something new and exciting (something old and exciting, maybe).
      --Joe
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.