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Re: Casting Game--Boromir concept

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  • David Lenander
    Replying to Pauline Alama s comment, [. . .] ... Yes, and Tolkien makes similar statements about traditional heroism in his criticism, see George Clark s
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 18, 2002
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      Replying to Pauline Alama's comment,

      [. . .]
      > My concept of Boromir is that in a more
      > conventional adventure story, he would have been the hero: the
      > warrior-adventurer, the blond, muscular firstborn nobleman who has spent many
      > years bravely holding the line against the forces of evil by the might of the
      > sword. By making him a failed hero and even for one crucial moment a traitor,
      > Tolkien made a statement about the flaw inherent in this conventional concept
      > of heroism (a sort of heroism he'd seen disastrously put to the test in WWI).
      > [. . . .]

      Yes, and Tolkien makes similar statements about traditional heroism in his
      criticism, see George Clark's essay, "J.R.R. Tolkien and the True Hero," in
      Clark's & Timmons's _J.R.R. Tolkien and His Literary Resonances: Views of
      Middle-earth_ (Greenwood Pr; Westport, CT; 2000).

      And I wonder if you'd enjoy Eleanor Arnason's _The Sword Smith_, which
      proceeds from a similar premise, and which is informed by Icelandic saga,
      with perhaps some of the same ethos that Tolkien is crtiquing. Eleanor's
      first novel is very hard to come by, however.... I suppose interlibrary
      loan from somewhere....

      -- David Lenander
      293 Selby Ave. St. Paul, MN 55102-1811
      d-lena@... 651-292-8887
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