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Bad review of the DVD

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  • David S. Bratman
    By Bryan Curtis, from Slate: http://slate.msn.com/?id=2069485 The makers of Fellowship of the Ring ... turned a great film into a bad commercial. The disks
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 15, 2002
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      By Bryan Curtis, from Slate: http://slate.msn.com/?id=2069485

      The makers of Fellowship of the Ring ... turned a great film into a bad
      commercial. The disks' bonus features—endless but uninformative
      documentaries and ads—are built to sell, sell, sell. Sell the official
      movie guide; the tie-in video game; the theatrical sequel; even the more
      souped-up Fellowship DVD, which arrives in November. By the time you've
      waded through the extras, you're positively grooving on the sweet smell of
      cross-promotion.
      Consider Fellowship's three documentaries and 11 short "featurettes," which
      look like they've been thrown together by the producers of Entertainment
      Tonight. There's almost no discussion of the making of the film. ...
      The Fellowship documentaries take a few on-set anecdotes and stretch them
      as thin as taffy. ...
      The theatrical trailers on the DVD have the same problem. Fellowship
      includes nine of them—three from the theater, six from television. Why? ...
      When New Line isn't selling us the movie we just bought, they're hawking
      the toy-store tie-ins. One of the documentaries included here ran as an
      in-store promotion for Houghton-Mifflin, makers of the Official Movie
      Guide. The second disk includes a preview—i.e., a commercial—for the
      upcoming Lord of the Rings video game. In it, the programmers boast that
      you can't tell the difference between the footage from the movie and that
      from the video game. Actually, you can ...
      The disks' best feature is also an ad, though it's a particularly skillful
      one: a 10-minute preview for Fellowship's sequel, The Two Towers, which
      arrives in theaters in December. Those 10 minutes, which include interviews
      with director Peter Jackson and the other filmmakers, contain more
      technical detail than the hours of "documentary" footage combined. The most
      tantalizing bit is a look at a computer program that allows the filmmakers
      to endow digital ogres with their own intelligence, a technique that one
      day, with any luck, can be reversed and used on the makers of this DVD.
      Not until you reach the end of the second disk, do you realize, achingly,
      that a better Fellowship disk is on the way. The Platinum Series Extended
      Edition, which arrives in stores Nov. 12, will include four audio
      commentaries and loads of fresh documentaries. Even more enticing is 30
      minutes of new footage that director Peter Jackson has added to the film.
      Jackson assures us this longer version isn't a "director's cut"—i.e., a
      shallow excuse to produce another high-dollar disk. No matter. We'll be
      pining for the new DVD, if only so we can dump this denuded version into
      the trash.
    • Lisa Deutsch Harrigan
      Hey, I got mine for $15. It s worth $15. I can sit down and start dissecting the costumes. Plus, I can begin work on the ones in TT . Mythically yours, Lisa
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 15, 2002
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        Hey, I got mine for $15. It's worth $15. I can sit down and start dissecting
        the costumes. Plus, I can begin work on the ones in TT <g>.

        Mythically yours,
        Lisa

        "David S. Bratman" wrote:

        > We'll be
        > pining for the new DVD, if only so we can dump this denuded version into
        > the trash.
        >
        >
        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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